Children of John Wigham and Marian Henrietta Richardson

Philip Wigham Richardson01. Philip Wigham Richardson (Lt Col Sir Philip Wigham Richardson, 1st baronet, MA, OBE, VD, JP)

1865-01-26 b. 32 Rye Hill, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland birth certificate; censuses; The Times; The Friend
c. 1865-07

In the summer Marian's parents celebrated their silver wedding on the Rhine, first at Rolandseck and then at Remagen. Marian and I went over, taking Philip, then half a year old, and his nurse. We took the steamer to Hamburg, and both Marian and the nurse were very ill, so much so, that when we got into the Elbe I had to see to the washing of the baby, and in my ignorance I took him on deck and got a sailor to fetch a bucket of salt water and a mop. The babe seemed to like it, but I was severely blamed for not having used warm water. It is a great mistake to take babies with you when you travel. At every principal station I had to push my way into the kitchen of the restaurant to get hot water for the bottle, and yet with every care poor Philip suffered dreadfully from diarrhœa, which did not fairly cease until we got down to the seacoast again at Rotterdam. I think it stunted his growth.

Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908; privately printed at Glasgow, 1911: 185-6
1866 autumn

We removed from Rye Hill in the autumn, and the first night there was a howling storm of wind, the sound of which roared down the big chimneys. Philip (born January 1854), was a little boy not two years old, and he repeated after me—"Jolly wind! Jolly wind" but both Marian and I had a sense of depression.

Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 204-5
1868-04 with aunts at Heugh Folds Elizabeth Spence Watson's "Family Chronicles"
1868-06-13 of Wingrove Mosscroft visitors' book
1871 of Wingrove House, Elswick, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, living with his family, a cook, a housemaid, and two nurses, with a visitor TNA: RG 10/5082 f92
1873 attended Ascham House school, Bournemouth Sir Philip Wigham Richardson (1952) 'It Happened to Me', London: Staples Press: 98
  educated at Rugby and King's College, Cambridge. At Rugby he achieved a reputation for running and football; he won the school steeplechase and was head of the running time in 1882 and 1883, and in the former year was awarded his football cap. The Times
1876 with Ernestine, taken by their mother to the opening of the Wagner Theatre at Bayreuth Richardson (1952): 171
1876-09 with mother at Berka, near Weimar; wrote to his father at Buxton; had been making a collection of (dead) animals Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 248
1878 at school in Bournemouth Elizabeth Spence Watson's "Family Chronicles"
1880 began as a rifle shot and was in the Rugby Ashburton VIII in 1881, in which year (and again in 1882) he shot for the Spencer Cup. The Times
1881 scholar, of boarding house to Rugby School, 27 Hillmorton Road, Rugby, Warwickshire RG 11/3077 f130 p27
  an accomplished chess player Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 252
1881-08 made a tour in Normandy with father, brother Cecil, Dr Gregory White and his son Douglas Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 268
1882-02-02

"Our visit to Cambridge is in one sense a failure, seeing that I found Mr. Lee-Warner [Philip's house master at Rugby] quite unwilling for Philip to leave Rugby. In fact he spoke so warmly about him that I felt quite set up. He says that Philip continually puzzles him by doing unexpected things against rule, but always atones by complete frankness.

"After my interview with the master, Philip went down to the hotel with me, but seemed to have his lessons so much on the brain that I let him off in about an hour and then  . . . I slept the clock round!

"In their club the boys have determined to give up The Times (on the score of expense) and to take in three penny papers instead. Austen Chamberlain proposed the Pall Mall, but after three-fourths of the boys had voted against and only one for, he in a very dignified way withdrew his motion, as he 'saw the sense of the meeting was against him.' Philip says this was not from any political (say Conservative) feeling, but just a mild 'plaguing' of Chamberlain, who is very well liked, and 'speaks awfully well.'"

Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 260-1
1882-02-03 "Mr. Prothero (of Kings) [ . . . ] invited Philip to pass their examination in January of next year with a view to coming up in October." Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 262
1882 summer visited Marseilles, accompanied by his tutor James Bowlker Richardson (1952): 14
1882-12-17

"Philip seems to be looking forward with great pleasure to seeing you [Georgina Waterhouse] this week—it is very good of you to have asked him. If he can conveniently do it, I should like him to go and look at the watches at the Waltham Watch Company's place in Holborn Circus. His Uncle George left him some money to buy a watch with, when he should be grown up, and I am anxious that he should have a really good one."

Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 264
1883 Easter Matric. ACAD - A Cambridge Alumni Database
1883-04-01 of Wingrove Bensham Grove visitors' books
1883 was in the Cambridge VIII for four years from 1883, and in the University Match Rifle IV for three years from 1884 The Times
1883-12-25 of Wingrove Bensham Grove visitors' books
1884-03-23 of Wingrove House, N'castle
1884-04-06 of Wingrove, Newcastle
1884-09-18 of Wingrove House
1884-12-25 of Wingrove, N'ctle
1885-01-05 of Wingrove House
1885 with a college friend, walked from Cambridge to Grasmere, 285 miles, in 9½ days Sir Philip Wigham Richardson (1952) 'It Happened to Me', London: Staples Press: 12
1885-07-05 of Wingrove Bensham Grove visitors' books
1886 BA  
1886 corporal in the Cambridge University Rifle Volunteers; tied first for the Queen's Prize, and afterwards appeared in the final for the Queen's and King's Prizes eight times. The Times
1886-07-23

Tied for the Queen's Prize at Wimbledon

"I had no idea that Philip was shooting for the great prize, and when General Hawkins at the Kurhaus handed me The Times, saying, 'There's somebody of your name seems to have been distinguishing himself at Wimbledon,' I went right off and telegraphed my congratulations to him at Cambridge. I felt quite a thrill!

"Now this morning I have a letter from Philip himself telling me quietly of the result, and proposing to pay me £50 as money laid out by me for him on rifle-shooting from first to last. It is truly touching, and I don't know how to express my thankful feelings for the lad's thoughtfulness."

Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 282-3; Richardson (1952): 43
1886 worked for a short time at the Berger family works, manufacturing textile goods, at Thann, in the Vosges mountains Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 308
1886-12-25 of Wingrove Bensham Grove visitors' books
1887-02-04 of Wingrove House
1887 began a five-year course at Neptune works, passing through every department in turn; at the conclusion was put on a wage of £2 a week Richardson (1952): 15
1887-11-20 of Wingrove House, N'C. Bensham Grove visitors' books
1887-12-26 "(arrived this morning from Madrid)"
1888 went on a Spanish steamer to Havana and Vera Cruz, visiting Mexico City at Christmas; on board ship fell in love with Rosa America Colorado Richardson (1952): 22
1890 MA ACAD
  He was during his life a member of every shooting team for which he was eligible, and was for more than 60 years a competitor at Wimbledon and Bisley. He took a great pride in being the "father" of the meeting and of Empire rifle shooting. The Times
1890-11-19 bapt. Benwell, Northumberland "England Births and Christenings, 1538–1975," database, FamilySearch: 10 February 2018, Philip Richardson, citing item 4 p 39, index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City, FHL microfilm 1,469,114
1890 journeyed to South America; also visited St Petersburg Richardson (1952): 64, 75
1891-04-05 not found in census  
1891-04-06 m.1. Rosa América Colorado (cal 1874 – 1926, of Cuba, d. of General Celestino Colorado), Gerona, Spain RG 13/492 f179 p59; GRO index; The Times; Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 312; ACAD; Civil Divorce Record (which includes a copy of the Spanish marriage certificate)
1891-09-04 ship builder, of 34 Rossmanton Terrace, Newcastle; m. Rosa America Richardson formerly Colorado, of the same address, at Newcastle Register Office; "previously married at Gerona Spain on the 6th April 1891"; his brother George one of the witnesses Civil Divorce Record
Children with first wife: John Edward Colorado (1892–1892), William Wigham (1893–1973), George Wigham (1895–1981) GRO index; The Times; Civil Divorce Record
1892 retired from active participation in the management of his father's business, and went to London to take up shipowning; continued to remain there as a shipowner and underwriter at Lloyds'; remained a partner at the Neptune Works, however Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 342
1892 appointed manager of the Trident Line, operating passenger and cargo steamers between Marseilles and Odessa Richardson (1952): 79
1892 established in business in London, and joined the North London Rifle Club Richardson (1952): 40
1893 visited Odessa Richardson (1952): 80
1895/1897 with his partner, constantly in Vienna and Budapest negotiating the sale of the Trident Line Steamers to a projected new company Richardson (1952): 44
1895-07-03 ship-owner, of Hawthorns, Half Moon Lane, Dulwich parish register, entry for son's baptism
1895-12-25 of The Hawthorns, Herne Hill, S.E. Bensham Grove visitors' books
1896 won a statuette of Queen Victoria in the NRA prize meeting Nice to Know
1897 visited Russia on business; met a Mr de Antonini, and Odessa lawyer; spent several months as manager of a gold mine in Siberia Richardson (1952): 44, 48
1897-10-21

In the High Court of Justice Probate Divorce & Admiralty Division (Divorce)

To The Right Honorable the President of the said Division

The 21st day of October 1897

The Petition of Philip Wigham Richardson of the "Hawthorns" Half Moon Lane Herne Hill in the County of Surrey

Sheweth

1. That your Petitioner was on the 6th day of April 1891 lawfully married to Rosa America Richardson then Rosa America Colorado Spinster at Gerona in the Kingdom of Spain and subsequently your Petitioner went through a form or ceremony of marriage on the 4th September 1891 with the said Rosa America Richardson at the Register Office in the District of Newcastle upon Tyne in the County of Northumberland

2. That after the said marriage your Petitioner lived and cohabited with his said Wife at divers places and that your Petitioner and his said Wife had had issue of their said marriage three children to wit John Edward Colorado Richardson born 18th February 1892 and died 28th August 1892 William Wigham Richardson born 12th June 1893 George Wigham Richardson born 12th April 1895

3. That on the third and thirteenth days of September 1897 and on other occasions in September 1897 at present unknown to your Petitioner at Verchne Vralsk in the Government of Orenburg in the Empire of Russia the said Rosa America Richardson committed adultery with Serge de Antonini Advocate of Odessa in the Empire of Russia

Your Petitioner there humbly prays That your Lordship will be pleased to decree

1. That the marriage of your Petitioner with the said Rosa America Richardson may be dissolved

2. That your Petitioner have the custody of his children

3. And that your Petitioner may have such further and other relief as to your Lordship may seem meet

[signed] Philip Wigham Richardson

Civil Divorce Record
1897-10-22 appellant for divorce; co-respondent Serge de Antonini Civil Divorce Record
1898 visited southern Spain with his wife and sister; also visited the West Indies Richardson (1952): 25, 92
1899 went to India in the P&O SS Valetta from Marseilles Richardson (1952): 84
1900-01 visited Tokyo on a pleasure trip Richardson (1952): 99
1901 shipwright and insurance broker, of The Hawthornes, Half Moon Lane, Camberwell, London, living with his family, a housemaid, a cook, and a nurse RG 13/492 f179 p59
1901 joined the Ulster Rifle Association in order to compete against the New Jersey R.A. on his visit to the USA; President Garfield was assassinated on the day of the competition; made 217 out of 225 at 800, 900 and 1000 yards, a world record for the small bore up to that date Richardson (1952): 42
1901/1902 visited the South Seas, on the Mariposa Richardson (1952): 115-28
1903 The pros and cons of the amalgamation of three firms as Swan, Hunter, & Wigham Richardson Ltd very much exercised the mind of John Wigham Richardson, who freely consulted his son Philip, leaving most of the final arrangements in his hands. Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 343
1903 bought his first motor car, at the Crystal Palace Show, for £600 Richardson (1952): 128
1904 drove to Madrid Richardson (1952): 128
1904 of The Hawthorns, Half Moon Lane, Herne Hill, London; with wife, gave Frank and Mary Pollard a silver sugar basin, for their wedding present Mary S.W. Pollard, list of wedding presents
1905-01-06

"It has been officially announced that Mr Philip Wigham Richardson will contest the Tyneside Parliamentary division in the Liberal Unionist interest at the next general election against Mr Robertson."

Jarrow Express
1905-02-06

Mr. Philip Wigham Richardson has intimated to the committee of the Tyneside Unionist Association that it is not his intention, owing to the pressure of business engagements, to contest the seat in the Unionist interest at the next election. The committee had invited Mr. Richardson to be their candidate.

Newcastle Daily Chronicle
1906 drove through France and Italy Richardson (1952): 129-30
Child with ____ Martin: (Jean) Remi Martin (1906 – ?) source misplaced; UK incoming passenger lists
1906/1953 member of the Council of the National Rifle Association NRA Imperial Competitions
1907 Captain, British Rifle team in Australia and Canada ACAD; Richardson (1952): 43, 60
1908 won a silver medal in the team military rifle event, in the Olympic Games in London. Wikipedia
1908-07-04 ship broker; co-executor his his father's will National Probate Calendar
1908-07-08 at Kenilworth Divisional Sessions:

Major William [sic] Wigham Richardson, 54, Halfmoon-lane, Herne Hill, was summoned for driving a motor-car at a speed of 32 miles an hour at Cubbington on the 28th ult.—Defendant was unable to appear as he was captaining a team at Bisley but sent a letter pleading guilty.—P.S. Butcher said that when he spoke to defendant the latter said, "There is not a car on the road but it exceeds the speed limit; but I admit everything. There was a most dangerous cross-road near the spot and some children were playing near at the time.—There was one previous conviction, and the magistrates imposed a fine of £2 and costs (10s.)

Warwick and Warwickshire Advertiser, 1908-07-11
1909 Q4 m.2. Bertha Anne Greenley (1880–1957, d. of John Edward and Bertha Clara (Dowson) Greenley, of Dulwich), Paddington RD GRO index; The Times; ACAD; information from Chris Hicks
1909/1910 visited Burma Richardson (1952): 133-54
Child with second wife: Irene Geraldine Wigham (1919–1997) GRO index
1911 shipowner and insurance broker; employer, of Aldenholme, Weybridge, Surrey, living with his wife, sister-in-law, a parlour maid, a cook, a housemaid, and two visitors; 22 rooms; details of a gardener and his family have been struck through and transferred to a separate return RG14PN2990 RD32 SD1 ED9 SN89
1912 Captain of the British Olympic team; came 65th in the 300 metre military rifle three positions event, and 33rd in the 600 metre free rifle event, in the Olympic Games in Stockholm. ACAD; Wikipedia; Richardson (1952): 43
1912-12 visited Colombo Richardson (1952): 155-9
1913 visited Japan and the Philippines Richardson (1952): 102, 160-63
1913-03-04 with wife and son, sailed for Honolulu from Hong Kong via Shanghai, Nagasaki, Kobe, Yokkaichi, and Yokohama, aboard the Manchuria Honolulu, Hawaii, Passenger and Crew Lists, 1900-1959; California Passenger and Crew Lists, 1882-1957
1913-03-24 ship owner, of Weybridge; with wife and son, arrived Honolulu from Yokohama, aboard the Manchuria Honolulu, Hawaii, arriving and departing passenger and crew lists
1913-04-07 with wife and son, arrived in San Francisco from Shinyo, Manchuria, via Honolulu, aboard the Chiyo Maru California Passenger and Crew Lists, 1882-1957
1913-05-27 with wife and son, arrived in Fishguard from New York, via the Cunard Line's Mauretania UK Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960
1914/1918 What had begun as a hobby was put to serious purpose during the 1914–1918 War, when Richardson used his remarkable knowledge and power to train snipers in the use of telescopic sights and to raise the already high standard of musketry throughout the British Army. He wrote an elementary book, Exterior Ballistics, and another, Notes on Sniping, and his services were recognized by his appointment as OBE in 1919. He had been Commandant of the National Rifle Association's School of Musketry, and was chairman of the association from 1939 to 1946. The Times
1914/1919 Served in the Great War, 1914–1919, (Brevet Lieut.-Col., T.F. Res.; Commander of the N.R.A. School of Musketry, 1914–1919; in France, 1916 and 1917 in connection with sniping and the use of telescopic sights; O.B.E.; mentioned in Sec. of State's List for "valuable services".) ACAD
1916-02-15 entered war service in France; Lt-Col in the Northumberland Fusiliers British Army World War I Medal Rolls Index Cards
1916-09-11

On Friday afternoon Teresa with Violet Browne left for Grasmere: Norbert and Ursula also there—and the work of dismantling dear Heugh Folds and arranging for Philip's occupation there being looked after by them.

Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1918/1953 a Vice-President of the NRA NRA Imperial Competitions
1919-01-01 Bt Lieut-Col, T.F. Reserve—appointed OBE The London Gazette
1920 Captain, British Rifle team in Australia and South Africa ACAD; Richardson (1952): 43
1920-06-11 applied for BW and Victory medals British Army World War I Medal Rolls Index Cards
1920/1921 in Australia and S. Africa ACAD; Richardson (1952): 182
1921-02-11 with wife, arrived Southampton from Capetown, aboard the Union Castle Steamship Company's Llanstephan Castle UK Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960
1921-06-24 knighted, "For services rendered throughout the Empire for 40 years in connexion with rifle shooting." The Times; ACAD; Exeter and Plymouth Gazette, 1921-06-04
1921-11-17 awarded Victory and British Medals British Army World War I Medal Rolls Index Cards
1921 ship insurance broker, employer, working at 85 Gracechurch St E.C.3; living in 14 rooms at Alden Lodge Aldenholme, Ellesmere Rd, Weybridge, Surrey; with his wife, his son George, a cook, three domestic servants, and a nurse, as well as a French visitor RG 15/03133 RD32 SD1 ED10 SN275
1922/1931 MP for Chertsey ACAD; Richardson (1952): 177-84
1922 with wife, visited Rio de Janeiro as members of a Parliamentary party presenting the British Pavilion at the Rio Exhibition to the Brazilian government Richardson (1952): 179
1922-10-27 MP, of 'Aldenholme', Weybridge, Surrey son's Freedom of the City of London admission papers
1922-11-14 with wife, arrived at Southampton from Buenos Aires, aboard the Royal Steam Packet Company's Almanzora UK Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960
1923 visited Poland with seven other MPs Richardson (1952): 185
1923-06-02 knight, MP, witnessed his son's marriage at Weybridge parish register
1923 autumn visited South America Richardson (1952): 198-207
1925 visited East Africa Richardson (1952): 208-23
1926-11-02 T.F.W.M Gen & Spec List British Army World War I Medal Rolls Index Cards
1927-02-14 with wife and daughter, arrived Southampton from Durban, Natal, E. London, Algoa, Capetown, and Madeira, aboard the Union Castle's Carnarvon Castle UK Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960
1928 awarded Greek maritime medal by the Greek Republic; "Sir Philip is believed to be the only Englishman to receive the Greek Maritime Medal, a distinction conferred upon him in 1928 in recognition of the many years he has devoted to the development of commercial relations between this country and Greece." ACAD; Richardson (1952): 59; Hull Daily Mail, 1929-06-29
1928 bought a biplane and learned to fly, at Brooklands, but gave up the idea of qualifying for a pilot's certificate Richardson (1952): 193-4; information from Mabel Weiss, who remembered being given a flight by him
1928-11-05 of "Aldenholme", Elesmere Road, Weybridge, Surrey; with wife and daughter, arrived Southampton from Cape Town, about the Carnarvon Castle UK Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960
1929 created a baronet, of Weybridge in the county of Surrey, for "political and public services" Richardson (1952): 183; Wikipedia; Western Morning News, 1929-06-29
1929 wrote and published Systems and Chances, a short book showing the futility of systems for winning at casino games such as roulette and trente et quarante, concluding:

I confess to having won and lost at gaming establishments, and to have made a bit more than I lost, which brings home the truth of the adage, "It is better to be born lucky thank rich," and I would add, It is better to be born lucky than to have the very best "system" so far devised.

P.W. Richardson (1929) Systems and Chances. London: G. Bell & Sons; Richardson (1952): 32
1930-01-20 with wife, arrived Southampton from Cape Town, aboard the Carnarvon Castle UK Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960
1930 and 1934 visited Oberammergau to see the Passion Play Richardson (1952): 130
1931-03-27 M.P., of Alvenholme, Weybridge; with his wife and daughter, departed London for Bombay, aboard the P&O Viceroy-of-India, travelling first class UK outward passenger lists
1933-01-16 shipbroker, of Aldenholme, Weybridge; with wife and daughter, arrived Southampton from Madeira, aboard the Union Castle's Armadale Castle UK Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960
1934-09-04 a director of Airspeed (1934) Ltd Nottingham Evening Post, 1934-09-04
1935 with wife and daughter, visited Kenya, Uganda and the Belgian Congo, finishing with a tour of Egypt Richardson (1952): 224-37
1936 had booked with Air France for a flight to the Continent Gloucestershire Echo, 1936-04-01
1937-02-19 arrived Plymouth from Porto Barrios, Guatemala, aboard the Hamburg-Amerika Linie's Caribia UK Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960
1937 toured down the east coast of Spain, with members of his family Richardson (1952): 131
1937 drove across the Sahara Richardson (1952): 238-48
1938 visited Nigeria, Liberia and Sierra Leone Richardson (1952): 249-52
1938-09-16 has been appointed vice-chairman of Swan Hunter and Wigham Richardson Ltd The Colliery Guardian
1938-12 visited NW India with wife and daughter Richardson (1952): 253-55
1939/1946 Chairman of the National Rifle Association ACAD; Richardson (1952): 63; NRA Imperial Competitions
1939 briefly joined the Home Guard, but resigned when his true age was found out Richardson (1952): 255
1939-09-29 director of public companies, justice of peace, living at Aldenholme, Ellismere Rd, Walton & Weybridge, Surrey, with his wife, a redacted individual [presumably their daughter], a private secretary, a cook housekeeper, a parlourmaid, a housemaid, a redacted individual [presumably a servant], and an underhousemaid; there is also a chauffeur, living with his family at The Garage, Aldenholme, and a gardener, living with his family at The Cottage, Aldenholme 1939 England and Wales Register (RG 101)
1941-02-18 2 EMBS|L/S I.V.A. 431 OY [no idea what this means, but that's what the card says] British Army World War I Medal Rolls Index Cards
1944 of Aldenholme, Weybridge The Times
1945/1949 of Swan Hunter & Wigham Richardson Benwell Community Project (1978) The Making of a Ruling Class. Two Centuries of Capital Development on Tyneside
  played a prominent part in the family business, of which he was eventually to become the head. He travelled all over the world to obtain orders and was an enthusiast for travel by air, owning his own light aircraft. The Times
1945 elected chairman of Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson Ltd Richardson (1952): 17
1946 Chairman, P. Wigham Richardson & Co. steamship owners and insurance brokers, of London; Chairman, Armadores Finance & Investment Co. Benwell Community Project (1978)
  Chairman, P. Wigham Richardson & Co.; Director, Anglo-Russian Maximoff Co., Southern Shan Estates Syndicate (1909) Ltd, Airspeed (1934) Ltd, Downton Tanning Co.
1947 and 1949 visited Spain Richardson (1952): 256
1949 chairman of Swan, Hunters Western Morning News, 1949-08-11
1950 took a motor tour to Belgium and Germany, and again saw the Oberammergau Passion Play Richardson (1952): 256
1952 published autobiography, 'It happened to me': Being the reminiscences of Sir Philip Wigham Richardson Sir Philip Wigham Richardson (1952) 'It Happened to Me', London: Staples Press
  To the end of his life he maintained his early enthusiasm and his zest for life and even after he was 80 years of age he made several visits abroad on business. The Times
  JP for Surrey ACAD
  author, Exterior Ballistics; Systems and chances. etc.
1953-11-23 of Aldenholme, Ellesmere-road, Weybridge, Surrey; d. Weybridge The Times; GRO index; National Probate Calendar
1953-11-25 obituary, with photo The Times
1954-02-18 will proved at London by Sir William Wigham Richardson and George Wigham Richardson; effects £100,203 16s. 10d. National Probate Calendar; The Times


Ernestine (Richardson) Bealey02. Ernestine Richardson (Ernie)

1868-02-26 b. Wingrove House, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland birth certificate; The British Friend; The Friend; censuses
1871 of Wingrove House, Elswick, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, living with her family, a cook, a housemaid, and two nurses, with a visitor TNA: RG 10/5082 f92
1871-08-02 of Wingrove Mosscroft visitors' book
1876 with Philip, taken by their mother to the opening of the Wagner Theatre at Bayreuth Sir Philip Wigham Richardson (1952) 'It Happened to Me', London: Staples Press: 171
1881 scholar, of Wingrove House, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, living with her family and five servants RG 11/5055 f162 p24
1881-04-14

On the 14th of April, the day before Good Friday all the dear children, that is, Ruth, Evelyn, Mary, Bertha, Arnold, with Mattie went off to Grasmere. "Aunt Car" had most kindly asked them all to spend their Easter holidays & their cousins Maurice & Ernestine Richardson were to join them.

Elizabeth Spence Watson's "Family Chronicles"
1881-10-29 of Wingrove House, Newcastle Bensham Grove visitors' books
  taught at home, then at Gateshead High School ACAD - A Cambridge Alumni Database
1882-04-28 of Wingrove House Bensham Grove visitors' books
1882-12-25 of Wingrove
1882 Christmas

And now Christmas has come & gone—we had over 70 on Christmas Day—old & young, & a very merry happy part, "Cinderella", got up by Ruth, was charmingly acted by some of the younger ones—Mary being a sweet little Cinderella, Charles the Prince, (acted with great dignity) Ernestine the godmother, Evie & Dora the two unkind sisters, & George the Herald.

Elizabeth Spence Watson's "Family Chronicles"
1883-01-13 of Wingrove House Bensham Grove visitors' books
1883-12-14/-15 of Wingrove House; stayed at Bensham Grove
1883-12-25 of Wingrove House, Newcastle
1884 with her father, made a stay at Kreuznach Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908; privately printed at Glasgow, 1911: 269
1884-12-25 of Wingrove, N'ctle Bensham Grove visitors' books
1885-01-05 of Wingrove House
1885-05-09/-16 of Wingrove House; stayed at Bensham Grove
1886 summer with her father, again went to Kreuznach for a few weeks Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 282
1887 Matric. Girton College ACAD
1887-10-01 of Wingrove Bensham Grove visitors' books
1887/1890-04 at Girton College; Class. Trip.; attained standard of Ord. Deg. ACAD
1889-05 with parents and sister, made a tour in Italy and Greece

From Corinth an excursion was made on horseback up Mt. Akrocorinthos and to the famous fountain of Pirene which actually was as clear as the old legends tell; for, seeing no water, Ernestine walked right into it and got drenched.

Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 286-94
1889 autumn with mother and brother George, had been at Weggis on the Lake of Lucerne Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 308
1890 Christmas

The Christmas party passed off with the accustomed success—some of the young people acted with great spirit "Ici on parle Français" Where all were good it were invidious to particularize, but perhaps Ernestine as the young Frenchman specially distinguished herself. Her very gestures were French, & her get-up capital.

Elizabeth Spence Watson's "Family Chronicles"
1891 of Wingrove House, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, living with her parents, four servants, and a visitor RG 12/4199 f106 p37
1892-04 with father, sailed in the Teutonic for New York, returning in early June; itinerary included Philadelphia, Washington and Montreal Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 313
1895-12-25 of Wingrove House Bensham Grove visitors' books
1896-04-09 of Wingrove House; present at cousin Mabel Spence Watson's wedding at Pilgrim Street fmh; signed marriage certificate. Robert Spence Watson's book of newspaper cuttings; Bensham Grove visitors' books
1896-12-25 of Wingrove House Bensham Grove visitors' books
1897 spring with father, made a voyage to Cape Town Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 336-9
1898-08-03 of Wingrove House Bensham Grove visitors' books
1899-11-04
1900-12-25 of Wingrove House, N'c'tle
1901-01-03 14:30 m. Rev. Frank Alfred John Bealey MA (1866–1936, clergyman), St Anne's, Soho, London (where he was curate) censuses; National Probate Calendar; Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 338; ACAD; Morning Post, 1900-12-21; Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript

NORTH COUNTRY MARRIAGE

IN LONDON

The marriage of Miss Ernestine Richardson, elder daughter of Mr J. Wigham Richardson, of Newcastle, to the Rev Frank Bealey, eldest son of the Rev J.K. Bealey, vicar of Middlesbrough, was solemnised yesterday in London. The ceremony took place at St. Anne's Church, Dean Street, Soho, and was witnessed by a large gathering of friends and relatives. There was a full choral service. The ceremony was conducted by the Rev J. Cardwell, vicar of St. Anne's, assisted by the Rev J.K. Bealey, the bridegroom's father. The bride, who was conducted to the altar by her father, was married in a travelling costume of pale blue cloth edged with ermine and trimmed with gold applique and old lace, and she wore a white picture hat, trimmed with white ostrich feather plumes and blue velvet. She carried a bouquet of white roses, gardenias, and lilies of the valley, and wore diamond and pearl ornaments, the gift of her mother. The only bridesmaid was her sister, Miss Theodora Richardson, who wore a turquoise blue serge dress, trimmed with ermine and ornamental satin. Mr Felix Corbett supported the bridegroom as best man.

At the conclusion of the ceremony the bride's mother held the wedding reception at the Hotel Russell, and later in the afternoon the newly married couple left town for Devonshire, where they intend passing the honeymoon.

Shields Daily Gazette, 1901-01-04
1901 living with her husband and a nurse at 97 Bedford Ct Mans, St Giles in the Fields & St George Bloomsbury, London RG 13/239 f66 p20
1901-07-25 of London Bensham Grove visitors' books
1902-09-08/-09 "vagrant"; stayed at Bensham Grove
1911 living with her husband, a cook, and a housemaid, at Beaulieu, Hatch End, Middlesex; 9 rooms RG14PN7081 RG78PN347 RD130 SD1 ED14 SN177
1937-02-17 sent a floral tribute to the funeral of her brother Maurice, at Sissinghurst Church Kent and Sussex Courier, 1937-02-19
1939-09-29 not found in 1939 Register 1939 England and Wales Register (RG 101)
  of 71 Princes House, Kensington Park Road, London, W11 ACAD
1952-12-30 of 71 Princes House, Kensington Park-road, London W.11; d. Calverley Lodge, Pembury-road, Tunbridge Wells GRO index; National Probate Calendar
1953-04-02 will proved at London by Sir Philip Wigham Richardson and George Wigham Richardson; effects £41,902 6s. 9d. National Probate Calendar


Maurice Wigham Richardson03. Maurice Wigham Richardson

1869-02-01 b. Wingrove, Westgate, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland birth certificate; The British Friend; The Friend; censuses
1871 of Wingrove House, Elswick, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, living with his family, a cook, a housemaid, and two nurses, with a visitor TNA: RG 10/5082 f92
  went to a small private school kept by the Rev. Charles Bowlker, vicar of Heddon-on-the-Wall Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908; privately printed at Glasgow, 1911: 261
1881 scholar, boarder, of Gervis Road, Ascham House, Christchurch, Hampshire RG 11/1194 f134 p42
1881-04-14

On the 14th of April, the day before Good Friday all the dear children, that is, Ruth, Evelyn, Mary, Bertha, Arnold, with Mattie went off to Grasmere. "Aunt Car" had most kindly asked them all to spend their Easter holidays & their cousins Maurice & Ernestine Richardson were to join them.

Elizabeth Spence Watson's "Family Chronicles"
1882-12-25 of Wingrove House, N.C. Bensham Grove visitors' books
1883-08 with father and brother Cecil in Norway

"has a genius for accidents"

Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 268
1883-12-25 of Wingrove House, Newcastle Bensham Grove visitors' books
1884 spent a year in the Orange Free State. "Maurice was the most delicate of the family, and the doctors advised an open air life for him." Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 336
1891 actor, boarder in household of John Alton, journeyman joiner, of 33 Oxford Street, Darlington, Durham RG 12/4042 f139 p28
1892-10-01 m. 1. Frances Annie Hadnum (1872–1925, b. Alnwick, Northumberland, d. of Francis Hadnum of Darlington), Preston RG14PN4634 RG78PN195 RD66 SD1 ED11 SN212; GRO index; RG 15/04565 RD66 SD1 ED10 SN96; Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 313
1898-10-29 with wife, arrived Liverpool from New York, aboard the Umbria UK Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960
1901 not found in census  
Child with first wife: Ena Valentine (1905–1891) GRO index
1904 with wife, gave Frank and Mary Pollard a spirit iron, for their wedding present Mary S.W. Pollard, list of wedding presents
after 1905 for a time had a poultry farm at Cowes Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 338
1911 private means, boarder in the household of two Aldridge sisters, at 14 Trinity Crescent, Folkestone, Kent; 19 rooms RG14PN4634 RG78PN195 RD66 SD1 ED11 SN212
1921 occupation recorded as "None"; living with his wife and daughter in 10 rooms at 4 Radnor Park West, Folkestone RG 15/04565 RD66 SD1 ED10 SN96
1925-10-11 had been for a considerable time Honorary Secretary of the British Empire Shakespeare Society (Folkestone branch) Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate & Cheriton Herald, 1925-10-17
1928-08-18 "The engagement is announced between Maurice Wigham Richardson, second son of the late John Wigham Richardson, of Newcastle-on-Tyne, and Madelaine Perette, younger daughter of the late Edward Addison Mangin, Bishopton, Ripon, and Mrs Mangin, Willow Bank, Ripon Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer
1929-01-16 m. 2. Madelaine Perette W. Mangin (1894–1983), in Ripon RD GRO index; information from Anne Hicklin

RIPON WEDDING.

Newcastle Bridegroom at Cathedral Ceremony.

The marriage took pace at Ripon Cathedral yesterday of Mr. Maurice Wigham Richardson, second son of the late Mr. John Wigham Richardson, of Newcastle-on-Tyne, and Madelaine Perette, younger daughter of the late Major Edwin Addison Mangin, of Bishopton, Ripon, and Mrs. Mangin, of Willow Bank, Ripon.

The bride, who was given away by her brother, Major E.B. Mangin, M.C., 2nd Bombay Pioneers, Indian Army, wore a gown in mediæval style of satin beauté, and had an old Brussels lace veil (lent by her aunt, Miss Mangin, of Sharow). She was attended by Miss Cicely Weekes, who wore a dress of flowered ninon. Mr. C.C. Jevelund, brother-in-law of the bride, was best man.

The ceremony was performed by the Archdeacon of Lindisfarne (uncle of the bride), assisted by the Rev. R. Macpherson (Precentor of Ripon Cathedral).

Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer, 1929-01-17
1929-04-15 c/0 Lloyd's Bank, Folkestone; with his wife, arrived Southampton from Natal, travelling 2nd class, on the Union-Castle's Kenilworth Castle UK incoming passenger lists
1937-02-14 of Copthall, Hawkhurst, Kent; d. 2 North-grove-terrace, Hawkhurst, peacefully, after a long illness National Probate Calendar; GRO index; The Times, 1937-02-15

DEATH OF MR. M.W. RICHARDSON.

The death occurred on Sunday at The Annexe, Highgate, Hawkhurst, of Mr. Maurice Wigham Richardson, aged 68. Mr. and Mrs. Richardson formerly resided at Copt Hall, Hawkhurst, and previously at Walnut Tree Cottage, Sissinghurst, about eight years. While at Sissinghurst Mr. Richardson read the lessons in the church and took an active part in the affairs of the parish. He was chairman of the Sissinghurst Conservative Association, and displayed great talent in producing Shakespearean amateur theatricals. An experienced mountaineer, he had done considerable Alpine climbing in Switzerland. He often went on walking tours and had climbed the high mountains in the lake district of Westmoreland and Cumberland. In earlier life he resided at Folkestone. Mr Richardson leaves a widow and one daughter. The funeral service was conducted at Sissinghurst Church on Wednesday by the Rev. C.H. Tomkins and the mourners were the widow, Mr. and Mrs. C.H. Gore, Lady Richardson, Miss Mangin, Mr. and Mrs. C.H. Mangin, Captain and Mrs. Richardson, Mr. G. Richardson, Mrs. Harrisson, Mr. Minshill and Miss Startup. Floral tributes were sent by: Perette; Ena and Harry; Berty and May; Chummy and Derrick; Doris, Judy and Tod; Ross; Billy and Betsy; Charles and Ursula; Eileen; Philip and Bertha Richardson; Sybil and Violet; Mr. and Mrs. C. Mangin; Mrs. Mangin, Major E.B. Mangin and Mrs. Jervlund; Major Welsh; Colonel and Mrs. Percyy De La Ernyme; Ernestine Bealey; Nurse; Mrs. Bond; Madge Day; Lieut.-Colonel and Mrs R.T. Toke; Mr. Howard Rumney and Family; Major W.P.A. Hattrsley Smith; General and Mrs. Drummond; Herbert Sullivan; Diana and Merlin Minshill; Major and Mrs. T.S. Torkington; T.G. Young; Mrs. Blakemney and Kathleen; the Watts Family and Margie; All at Merry Croft; Colonel and Mrs. Roger Wilkinson; the Rev. C.H. and Mrs. Tomkins; Irene and Oriane; Mrs. Tom Williamson; the Misses Hill; the Old Sissinghurst Shakespeare Group; Miss Ida Thompson, Miss Lilian Thompson and Miss H.C. Thompson.

Kent & Sussex Courier, 1937-02-19
1937-02-17T12:00 private funeral at Sissinghurst, Kent The Times, 1937-02-15
1937-06-16 will proved at London by widow Madelaine Perette Richardson; effects £5420 3s. 9d. National Probate Calendar


Cecil Richardson04. Cecil Richardson

1870-02-06 b. Wingrove House, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland birth certificate; The Friend
1871 of Wingrove House, Elswick, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, living with his family, a cook, a housemaid, and two nurses, with a visitor TNA: RG 10/5082 f92
1881 scholar, of the Vicarage House, Heddon on Wall, Northumberland, one of four boarders with Charles Bowlker, vicar and farmer RG 11/5098 f95 p7
  went to a small private school kept by the Rev. Charles Bowlker, vicar of Heddon-on-the-Wall Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908; privately printed at Glasgow, 1911: 261
1881-08 made a tour in Normandy with father, brother Philip, Dr Gregory White and his son Douglas Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 268
1881-12-26 of Wingrove House Bensham Grove visitors' books
1883-12-25 of Wingrove House, Newcastle
1884-09-14 of Wingrove
1884-12-25 of Wingrove, N'ctle
1885-02-06 d. Newcastle upon Tyne GRO index (registered as Cyril Richardson); Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 273
 

In February 1885 a heavy sorry befell the Wingrove household in the death of the third son, Cecil. He had been sent in 1884 to the Royal Grammar School of Durham, but only remained there one term, as it did not suit his health. The following term he went to Uppingham. He got through the term well, but his parents were uneasy about a severe attack of earache which lasted two or three days. But he came home at Christmas apparently in good health.

The following notes were written by J.W.R. "On Wednesday (7th. Jan. '85) I had to go up to London by the night express, returning on Saturday night. All Sunday I had a severe headache, but I was told that Cecil had suffered so much from earache that Dr. Armstrong had been called in on the Wednesday, and on the Friday he repeated his visit. However, Cecil said to me during the afternoon, 'Do come and have a ride on the moor with me, Papa. It will cure your headache.' On my declining, he went out to the stables without saying anything and saddled the horses himself, and came and again invited me to ride. I went with him accordingly, and I admired his firm seat, and the bold way he went over the ditches, etc., and, as he had said, my headache was cured. . . . Monday, Jan. 12, a biting cold day. Cecil went out to ride with Ernestine, when he suddenly threw the reins on his horse's neck, put his coat collar up, and exclaimed, 'Oh my ear, my ear!'

"He came home and was put to bed and was evidently in much pain. The doctor came daily. On Tuesday, Feb. 3rd, at 5 A.M. his mother went to his room on account of his cries of pain. Fomentations were applied, but he grew worse, and meningitis supervened. The pain was most acute and agonizing to watch, but he was always in a perfectly conscious state.

 "On Thursday, Feb. 5th., his eyes became insensible to light and he exclaimed, 'Let me kiss you, mother dear,' and tried to repeat the hymn 'Gentle Jesus.' . . . Friday, Feb. 6th.—his fifteenth birthday. At 8. 15 p.m. the final struggle. It seemed as if his soul went down into Hades, and then at once flew up on high. Instantly his face changed and became peaceful; one last sound after 9 o'clock, and—all was silent for ever."

Cecil was a most lovable character, a great favourite with his schoolfellows, and devoted to his parents. He was extremely fond of poetry.

Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 272-4
 

On the 7th of February, our dear nephew Cecil Richardson, my brother John's son, died, after a very suffering illness. He was just 15 when he died, & such a fine, bright boy. It is a great grief to his parents, but they are bearing their sorrow with a noble resignation.

Elizabeth Spence Watson's "Family Chronicles"


Theodora Wigham (Richardson) Minshall05. Theodora Wigham Richardson (Dora)

1871-10-23 b. Wingrove House, Westgate, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland (apart from the birth certificate, most sources give birth date as 1871-10-16) birth certificate; The Friend; The British Friend; 'The Story of Our Lives from Year to Year'—birthday book made by Mary Spence Watson for Caroline Richardson
1881 not found in census  
1881-07-17 of Wingrove House Bensham Grove visitors' books
1882 Christmas

And now Christmas has come & gone—we had over 70 on Christmas Day—old & young, & a very merry happy part, "Cinderella", got up by Ruth, was charmingly acted by some of the younger ones—Mary being a sweet little Cinderella, Charles the Prince, (acted with great dignity) Ernestine the godmother, Evie & Dora the two unkind sisters, & George the Herald.

Elizabeth Spence Watson's "Family Chronicles"
1884-12-25 of Wingrove, N'ctle Bensham Grove visitors' books
1885-05-09/-16 of Wingrove House; stayed at Bensham Grove
1885-10 with father, went for a little riding tour into Cumberland, to visit the Ecroyds at Armathwaite on the River Eden near Carlisle Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908; privately printed at Glasgow, 1911: 280-2
1887-04-05 of Wingrove Bensham Grove visitors' books
1887-10-01
  went to Oxford University Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 285
1889-05 with parents and sister, made a tour in Italy and Greece

After dinner [at a Geonese Palazzo] a portly marchioness, ablaze with jewels, in an ill-starred moment asked Dora to guess her age. To J.W.R.'s great amusement the reply was, "I think you are thirty-one." Whereupon the noble lady, with a shriek of dismay, jumped up and called for her husband. The marquis and all the other men came to see what had happened to cause such commotion. They were all full of sympathy when the matter was explained, for the lady was only nineteen! Dora was very much confused at the time, but remarked to her parents afterwards: "I should have thought she would have been very proud of being taken for as much as thirty-one!"

Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 286-94
1890-11 with parents, began a foreign tour which lasted several months; her parents left her at Rome, where she spent six months for the study of drawing Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 307-10
1891 not found in census  
1895-06-30 of Wingrove Bensham Grove visitors' books
1895-12-25 of Wingrove House
1896-04-09 of Wingrove; present at cousin Mabel Spence Watson's wedding at Pilgrim Street fmh; signed marriage certificate Robert Spence Watson's book of newspaper cuttings; Bensham Grove visitors' books
1896-07-20 of Wingrove Bensham Grove visitors' books
1896-12-25 of Wingrove House
1898-12-26 of Wingrove House—N'c'tle; "(Norny going to Spain)"
1899-12-25 of Wingrove
1900-12-25 of Wingrove House, N'c'tle
1901 of Wingrove House, Westgate Road, Elswick, Newcastle-on-Tyne, living with her family, a visitor, a cook, a parlourmaid, a housemaid, a sewing maid, and a kitchenmaid TNA: RG 13/4773 f139 p21
1901-12-25 of Wingrove House; "the last Christmas there: 1901) Bensham Grove visitors' books
1904 occasionally took a day's hunting with her father Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 340
1904 of Hindley Hall, Stocksfield; gave Frank & Mary Pollard a copper candlestick, for their wedding present Mary S.W. Pollard, list of wedding presents
1905-08-26 "Dora's engagement to Herbert Minshall an interesting event of the Summer." Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1906-02-14 m. (Thomas) Herbert Minshall (1873–1971, colonel, H.M. army, b. Wrexham, Denbighshire, Wales), at Oxford GRO index; RG14PN3002 RG78PN105 RD32 SD2 ED7 SN25; RG 15/00098 RD2 SD2-1 ED4 SN3; Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript

MARRIAGE OF MR. T.H. MINSHALL.

Croydon's Former Electrical Engineer.

A wedding which attracted a large congregation took place at St. Peter in the East Church, Oxford, last week. The contracting parties (says "The Oxford Chronicle" were Mr. Thomas Herbert Minshall, M.I.E.E., of Hampstead, and Miss Theodora Wigham Richardson, daughter of Mr. John Wigham Richardson, of Hindley Hall, Northumberland. The service was fully choral, the hymns, "New every morning is the love," "The roseate hues of early dawn," and "O perfect love," being rendered during the course of the service. As the party entered the church the "Wedding March" from "Lohengrin" was played, whilst the March from "Tannhauser" was given as the bridal party left the church. The sacred edifice had been beautifully decorated with flowers brought specially from the home of the bride in Northumberland, together with additional flowers and palms, the whole being arranged by Messrs. Bates and Son. The Rev. Canon J.R. King (Vicar) officiated, and was assisted by the Rev. Jacob Forrest, Vicar of Potter's Bar. The bride, who was given away by her father, was dressed in an ivory Oriental satin dress, with a picture ground, opened over a crepe de chene skirt, with lattice work embroidered with pearls, the gift of her mother. She had an old Limerick lace veil, and carried a shower bouquet of white orchids and lilies of the valley. She also wore an opal and ruby pendant, the gift of the bridegroom. Miss Lucy Geikie, the daughter of Sir Archibald Geikie, who acted as bridesmaid, wore a Charles II. dress of pale blue chiffon taffeta, with lace coating. Her hat was of velvet, trimmed with real azaleas, apricot coloured, whilst she carried a bunch of apricot azaleas, sent from the residence of the bridegroom. Capt. A. Pocklington undertook the duties of best man. The wedding was very quiet, owing to the indisposition of the bride's mother, and there was, therefore, no reception: neither were there any guests other than relatives. Mr. and Mrs. Minshall left later for North Italy, where the honeymoon will be spent. The bride's travelling dress was of blue cloth, faced with white, with a brown hat, whilst the handsome furs she wore were the gift of her father.

The presents were handsome and numerous [ . . . listed comprehensively, at great length].

Croydon Guardian and Surrey County Gazette, 1906-02-24
 

On St. Valentine's Day 1906, calm, bright, frosty, with glistening snow on the ground, his daughter Dora was married to Thomas Herbert Minshall, son of Thomas Edward Minshall of Hampstead. The ceremony was performed at the little Saxon church of St. Peter in the East at Oxford, by the vicar Canon King and the Rev. Jacob A. Forrest.

The newly married couple settled first at a house called Tarentum, close the to the quaint old village of Chobham.

Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 346
1906-05 has new home at Chobham Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
Children: Merlin Theodore (1906–1987), Felix Ranulf (1909–1909), Sylvia Diana (1911 – after 1965) GRO index
1907 moved with family to Great Grove Farm, Ottershaw, four or five miles distant from Chobham Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 346
1908-06 at Hindley Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 357
1911 living with husband, cook, and parlourmaid, at Great Grove, Ottershaw, Chertsey, Surrey; 12 rooms RG14PN3002 RG78PN105 RD32 SD2 ED7 SN25
1914/1918 worked for the British Secret Service, but said she was working in the Foreign Office Merlin Minshall (1975) Guilt-Edged. London: Bachman & Turner: 24-7; information from Mabel Weiss
1919 living with husband at 67 Frognal, Hampstead and Holborn, London electoral register
  once gave cast-off clothing to Mabel Weiss, whose family found this slightly insulting, as the Minshalls weren't much better off than they were information from Mabel Weiss
1921 home duties; living in 12 rooms at 9 Melbury Road, Kensington, with her consulting engineer husband, their daughter, an H.p. [?] maid, a nurse maid, and a cook, as well as a visitor RG 15/00098 RD2 SD2-1 ED4 SN3
1921, 1923/1932 living with her husband at 9 Melbury Road, Westminster, London W14 electoral registers
1923-03-03 a gardener, pruning a poplar tree at the Melbury Road house, and died of a fractured skull upon admission to hospital West London Observer, 19
1923-03-08 inquest held at Hammersmith:

Theodora Wigham Minshall, wife of Col. H.T. Minshall, late of the Royal Engineers, of 9, Melbury Road, Kensington, said she was very careful to obtain competent men to do work in her garden. It was her impression that Mr. Lawson remarked to her that the poplar tree seemed unsafe, and advised her to have the top out of it. She then asked Mr. Tame to come and do the work for her on the Monday, but he replied that he was sorry but he would be unable to do that because of his business. He then suggested that he should do it at once. He was doing this when witness heard of the accident. Seven doctors were 'phoned for, but the ambulance arrived and he was taken away to the Infirmary.

The Coroner reported a verdict of "Accidental Death."

1926-02-12/-14 of Sperle Cottage, Felbridge, Nr East Grinstead, Sussex, and Tower House, 9 Melbury Rd, Kensington; stayed with the Pollards at Fairlight, 9 Denmark Road, Reading Frank and Mary Pollard visitors' books
1928-05-31 with her daughter, of Friars, Matfield, Kent
1930-10-10

Colonel and Mrs. T.H. Minshall, of Matfield, before returning this week to their town residence, The Tower House, 9, Melbury-road, Kensington, for the winter, entertained a house party to archery, music and bridge. The guests present were His Highness the Emir Hossein Khazeimeh Alem, Sir Cyril and Lady Hurcomb, Miss Cicely Hurcomb, Sir Philip Richardson, M.P., and Lady Richardson, Sir Francis and Lady Goodenough, Lady Handley Spicer, Senorita Elena Blanch de Sanchez, Miss Olive Douglas, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Lydall, Mr. G.B. Richardson and Mr. Graeme Haldane. Mrs Minshall and Miss Diana Minshall will be leaving at the end of this week for Rome

Sevenoaks Chronicle and Kentish Advertiser, 1930-10-10
1932-11-04 of Friars, Watfield, Brenchley, Kent; d. Tonbridge National Probate Calendar; GRO index; letters of Mary S.W. Pollard, in my possession
 

My mother never fully recovered from the strain of those war years in the Secret Service. [ . . . ] Eventually, haunted by fears that she could never share and memories she could never escape, my mother committed suicide.

Minshall (1975): 27
1933-03-27 will proved at London by widower Thomas Herbert Minshall and brother George Beigh Richardson; effects £2102 16s. 11d. National Probate Calendar


George Beigh Richardson06. George Beigh Richardson

1872-11-26 b. Wingrove, Westgate Road, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland The Friend; not found in GRO index
  "The family tradition is that George B. was asked how to spell it and he said BEIGH (it didn't stand for anything)." letter to me from Jane Deas, 1987-02-06
1881 scholar, of Wingrove House, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, living with her family and five servants TNA: RG 11/5055 f162 p24
1881-07-17 of Wingrove House Bensham Grove visitors' books
1882 Christmas

And now Christmas has come & gone—we had over 70 on Christmas Day—old & young, & a very merry happy part, "Cinderella", got up by Ruth, was charmingly acted by some of the younger ones—Mary being a sweet little Cinderella, Charles the Prince, (acted with great dignity) Ernestine the godmother, Evie & Dora the two unkind sisters, & George the Herald.

Elizabeth Spence Watson's "Family Chronicles"
1884-01-13 of Wingrove House Bensham Grove visitors' books
1884-09-14 of Wingrove
1884-12-25 of Wingrove, N'ctle
1885-12-25 of Wingrove
1891 not found in census  
1895-12-25 "Coll: Vigorn: Oxon:" [i.e. Worcester College, Oxford] Bensham Grove visitors' books
1896-01-12
1896-04-09
1896-07-20 of Inner Temple
  called to the bar The Friend
1896-09-24 of Wingrove House, N'C. Bensham Grove visitors' books
1896-12-25 of Wingrove House—N'ctle
1898-07-23 of Wingrove House, N'c'tle
1898-12-26 of Wingrove House—N'c'tle
1899-07-07 a director of Wigham-Richardson & Co. Limited Truth, 1899-07-06
1899-12-25 of Wingrove Bensham Grove visitors' books
1900-12-25 of Wingrove House, N'c'tle
1900-08-05 of Wingrove Ho. N/C.
1900-10

Theo resigns his position at Blaydon Chemical Works—remains Director—Norbert appointed Director of Co. also George B.R.

Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1901 manu. engr and ship bldr, of Wingrove House, Westgate Road, Elswick, Newcastle-on-Tyne, living with his family, a visitor, a cook, a parlourmaid, a housemaid, a sewing maid, and a kitchenmaid RG 13/4773 f139 p21
1901-05-06 of Wingrove House, N'c'tle Bensham Grove visitors' books
1902-06-13 of Hindley Hall, Stocksfield
1902-09-08/-09 of Hindley Hall, Stocksfield; stayed at Bensham Grove
1903-03-25 "Lady Day" /-26
  Hindley Hall was rented by John Wigham Richardson, to whom George was paying £2 per week as lodger the full wiki
1903-06-18 a director of Wigham Richardson and Co. (Ltd), 4, Fen Court, London, E.C.; a director of the new Swan, Hunter, and Wigham Richardson (Limited) Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 1903-06-18
early 1900s visited Athens, staying at the Grande Bretagne Hotel in Constitution Square information from Richard Harrisson, citing unpublished diaries of George Beigh Richardson
1904-02-22

A marriage is announced to take place, soon after Easter, between George Beigh Richardson, youngest son of Mr. John Wigham Richardson, of Hindley Hall, Stocksfield, and Isabel Margaret, younger daughter of Mr. Gerard Brown Finch, of Howes Close, Cambridge, and honorary fellow of Queen's College, Cambridge.

Newcastle Daily Chronicle
1904-04-16 m. Isabel Margaret Finch (1877–1954), at Chesterton GRO index

MARRIAGE OF MISS FINCH, AT GIRTON.

The marriage of Miss Isabel Margaret Finch, daughter of Mr. Gerard Brown Finch, of Howes Close, Cambridge, to Mr. George Beigh Richardson, son of Mr. Wigham Richardson, of Hindley Hall, Stocksfield, took place on Saturday, at St. Andrew's Church, Girton. The weather was delightful, and the whole village turned out to witness the interesting ceremony. The officiating clergyman was the Rev. Frank Bealey, brother-in-law of the bridegroom, who was assisted by the Rev. Jacob Forrest, cousin of the bridegroom, and the Rev. H. Jordan Cheeseman, Rector of Girton. Mr. Chas. M. Merz accompanied the bridegroom as best man, and the bride was attended by her two cousins, Miss Constance and Miss Lily Finch, and Miss Wigham-Richardson, as bridesmaids. The bride was attired in a beautiful ivory chiffon satin dress, trimmed with point-de-Venise, and she wore a diamond necklet, the gift of the bridegroom. The bridesmaids were dressed in Cambridge-blue tussore picture frocks and white straw proke bonnets, in the early Victorian style, trimmed with white lilac, and carried dainty bouquets of white lilac, and wore enamel and pear necklaces, the gift of the bridegroom.

There were present at the ceremony:—Mr. and Mrs. Wigham-Richardson, Mr. and Mrs. G.B. Finch, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Finch, Mr and Mrs. Herbert Finch, Mr. and Mrs. Hardy (sister of the bride), Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Heneage Finch, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Finch, and Mr. Frederick Finch, Mr. and Mrs. Joshua Finch, Mr. Joshua King, Miss Kate King, Miss Gertrude King, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Browett, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Browett, Mr. Marshall, Mr. Shand, Mr. and Mrs. Philip Richardson, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bealey (sister of the bridegroom), Mr. and Mrs Maurice Richardson, Mrs. Frank Barnes, Miss Caroline Richardson, Dr. and Mrs. Merz, Mrs. Kuhlmann, and many others. After the ceremony the guests adjourned to luncheon at Howes Close.

A reception was held on the previous day at Howes Close, at which numerous guests were present; and in the evening Mr. and Mrs. Finch entertained to dinner, in the Hall of Queens' College, of which College Mr. Finch is an Honorary Fellow, a large party of relatives and friends of both families.

The presents, of which there were over 300, included many beautiful and useful articles, and they were much admired.

Cambridge Independent Press, 1904-04-22
shortly before 1904-04-20

From there to Cambridge for George B. R's wedding. A brilliant occasion. Isabel Finch the Bride charming all.

Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1904 of Glebe Cottage, Stocksfield-on-Tyne; with wife, gave Frank and Mary Pollard an armchair, for their wedding present Mary S.W. Pollard, list of wedding presents
Children: Michael Finch Wigham (1905–1988), Nancy Finch (1907–1979), Celia Finch Wigham (1909–1994), Ursula Finch Wigham (1911–1984), John Wigham (1916–1984) GRO index; The Friend; Who's Who; source for death of Nancy Finch misplaced
1906-03-20

Mother & I drove in with Father & then went to see the enormous Cunard ship Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson are building. I think it is the biggest ship that has ever been built. 30,000 gross tonnage. Will carry 3000—crew 800. 6 decks. It isn't finished, but George took us over & it was most interesting.

diary of Mary S.W. Pollard
1907-03-06 daughter b. at 1 Lambton Road, Newcastle-on-Tyne The Friend XLVII:180, 1907-03-15
1908-07-04 company director; co-executor of his father's will National Probate Calendar
1908-07-23 agreed to act as a trustee of the Walker Hospital Newcastle Daily Chronicle, 1908-07-25
1909-02-14 at Walker parish church, unveiled the memorial window to John Wigham Richardson Newcastle Daily Chronicle, 1909-02-15
1909-07-20 daughter b. at 1 Lambton Road, Newcastle-upon-Tyne The Friend XLIX:518, 1909-07-30
1910-07-06 "George our guest and a very cheery one—while Isabel and their children are in Cornwall." Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1910-07-14 "A very delightful visit from George while Isabel and the 3 were at Falmouth."
1911 director of public companies:– chiefly shipbuilding and marine engineering, employer, of 1 Lambton Road, Newcastle-on-Tyne, living with his family, a nurse, an under-nurse, a cook, a parlour-maid, and a housemaid; 9 rooms RG14PN30570 RG78PN1752 RD558 SD2 ED13 SN204
  marine architect and director of Swan Hunter & Wigham Richardson The Friend
  Chairman, Foremen's Mutual Benefit Society The Friend; Benwell Community Project (1978) The Making of a Ruling Class. Two Centuries of Capital Development on Tyneside
  Chairman, Blaydon Manure & Alkali Co. Benwell Community Project (1978)
1914-05-18 on board the Arum on her trial trip on the Tyne Newcastle Journal, 1914-05-19
1916-07-21 "George and his family go to Heugh Folds for the month of August." Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1916 co-editor of the Official Handbook to Newcastle & District WorldCat; Newcastle Daily Chronicle, 1916-08-29
1920-06-08 company director; administrator of the estate of his brother Felix Gabriel Richardson National Probate Calendar
1921 director of public companies, employer, no fixed place of work; living in 12 rooms at Lindum, Melbury Road, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, with his wife, their two younger children, a nurse, a cook, a parlourmaid, and a housemaid RG 15/25383 RD558 SD5 ED24 SN345
1922-06-28 "G. B. R. safely through a formidable operation for stone: a great blessing." Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1922-08-15 "George still an invalid: 3 months laid up a severe trial for him and Isabel and we all long for his complete recovery."
1927 of Lindum, Jesmond Park, Newcastle-upon-Tyne The Times
living with his wife and son Michael at Lindum, Melbury Road, Newcastle upon Tyne electoral register
1932 living with his wife and three daughters at Lindum, Melbury Road, Newcastle upon Tyne electoral register
1933 of Lindum, Jesmond Park, Newcastle-upon-Tyne The Times
1933-03-27 ship builder; co-executor of the will of his sister Theodora Wigham Minshall National Probate Calendar
1934 living with her husband and three daughters at Lindum, Melbury Road, Newcastle upon Tyne electoral register
1935-05-28 of Lindum, Melbury-road, Jesmond Park, Newcastle-upon-Tyne; d. there National Probate Calendar; The Times; The Friend; GRO index

PASSING OF TYNE SHIPBUILDER

DIRECTOR OF MESSRS SWAN HUNTER'S

Mr George B. Richardson, of Lindum, Jesmond Park, Newcastle, fourth son of the late Mr John Wigham Richardson, of Hindley Hall, Stocksfield, the famous shipbuilder, and a brother of Lieut.-Colonel Sir Philip Wigham Richardson, died suddenly last night, at his home, aged 62.

Mr Richardson was taken ill about a week ago. He had retained an active interest in the firm of Swan, Hunter and Wigham Richardson, Ltd., of Wallsend, of which he had been a director since its establishment as a limited liability company in 1903.

Only Mr Richardson's strong will-power saved his life a few years ago when he was forced to undergo a series of operations.

Mr Richardson, who spent most of his youth at Hindley Hall, was educated at Rugby.

He followed in his father's footsteps and became a shipbuilder, eventually establishing the Neptune (Walker) shipyard.

One of his greatest interests was the Foremen's Mutual Benefit Society of which he was chairman for many years.

He is survived by a widow and three children. The eldest son is abroad.

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1935-05-29
  of Lindum, Melbury-road, Jesmond Park, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, barrister-at-law, a director of Swan Hunter and Wigham Richardson, Wallsend Shipyard, and late chairman of the Blaydon Manure and Alkali Co. (1877) and the Foremen's Mutual Benefit Society, and a director of the Industrial Plant Co. and the Staff Benefit Society The Colliery Guardian, 1935-09-20
1935-05-30 bur. (or perhaps memorial service only) Pilgrim Street Friends' meeting-house, Newcastle-upon-Tyne The Times; The Friend (memorial service)
1935-08-07 will proved at Newcastle by Alfred Heneage Finch and cousin Norbert Merz; effects £77,409 17s. 10d., with net personalty £73,904 National Probate Calendar; The Colliery Guardian, 1935-09-20


Felix Gabriel Richardson07. Felix Gabriel Richardson

1878-01-21 b. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland GRO index; Old York Scholars' Association (1971) Bootham School Register. London: Oyez Press; 'The Story of Our Lives from Year to Year'—birthday book made by Mary Spence Watson for Caroline Richardson
1881 scholar, of Wingrove House, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, living with his family and five servants TNA: RG 11/5055 f162 p24
1891 pupil, of Olivers Mount School, Scarborough, Yorkshire RG 12/3967 f73 p51
1894-07-20 of Wingrove House, Newcastle-upon-Tyne; killed by a gun accident, Malvern School, Malvern, Worcestershire National Probate Calendar; GRO index; Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 313-5
 

A COLLEGE CADET SHOT.

At Malvern College last night, Felix Gabriel Richardson, 17, son of Mr. Richardson, Wingrove, Newcastle-on-Tyne, was cleaning his rifle when it went off, shattering the right side of his face and killing him instantly. The deceased was a member of the Cadet Corps, and it is supposed he put the gun away loaded and forgot the circumstance. The young gentleman was to have taken part in a shooting competition to-day, and is supposed to have been preparing his rifle, which was between his knees, when it exploded.

Manchester Evening News, 1894-07-21
 

On the 20th. of July 1894, J.W.R. and his wife had the great sorrow of losing their youngest son, Felix Gabriel, in his seventeenth year, while at Malvern College. He was a delicate, gentle and rather shy boy, very fond of flowers and of pictures. His horsemanship was unusually good; he had an excellent seat from the age of three and a half, and not an atom of fear. By the time he was eight he was considered competent to accompany his sisters, without any groom. He had infinite patience with young horses, and as a child his ambition was to be a horse-trainer. At Malvern College, he belonged to the school corps of volunteers. There was a rule that after shooting practices all unused ammunition should be returned to the instructor. One fears that through absent-mindedness or inattention, Felix must have forgotten to give up his last round. It appears that he was cleaning his rifle in his study in the evening and it exploded in his face, and he was thus found by his poor study companion.

Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908: 313-5
1894-07-23

A MALVERN COLLEGE BOY SHOT.

The inquest on the body of Felix Gabriel Richardson, who was found shot at one of the College Boarding Houses, on Friday, was held at the Sanatorium of the College, on Monday, before Mr. W.P. Hughes, County Coroner, Mr. W. Lambert attended to watch the case on behalf of the parents. Mr. E. Nevinson (solicitor), and Dr. Pike (the doctor to the College), also attended.

Mr. JOHN WICKHAM RICHARDSON, of Winwood House, Newcastle-on-Tyne, said he was a ship builder and engineer. He was the father of the deceased, who was 17 years of age. Witness last saw him during the Easter Holidays, when he was at home and in good health and spirits, seemed perfectly happy and contented and made no complaints as regarded the school. Deceased was always fond of shooting and accustomed to the use of fire-arms. He was a member of the Artillery Cadet Corps. Recent reports of deceased's conduct at school were perfectly satisfactory. Preview reports had said he might do better, and the last one said he had done better. Witness sent the report to deceased, who was continuing at school. The rifle was presented to deceased by his brother. It was a Martini-Henry rifle. Ammunition was not sent with it when it was presented. Deceased was generally of a happy and contented disposition, and he knew nothing that had happened to affect deceased's mind any way.

Mr. RALPH EDWARD LYON, house master at the college, said: Deceased was a pupil at my house since last September, I saw him on the Thursday, and he then seemed happy and contented. His school life seemed to be a happy one, particularly with his form master, Mr. Salisbury. About ten minutes to seven on Friday, as I was returning from the College cricket ground, a pupil of the College reported that a pupil was shot. I sent for Dr. Brockatt and for the headmaster, and went to deceased's study. Robert Yates, Guy Yates, and R. Hughes occupied the same study. The matron, Ellen Aan, was in the study, supporting deceased, who was on the floor. Deceased was bleeding profusely from his head, and there was a deep channel on the right side of his face. With the aid of those in the room I got the body on to the table. Did not see the rifle in the room; it was brought to me afterwards. I knew deceased was in possession of the rifle, but did not know that he had ammunition. As a member of a shooting team he would be allowed to keep his rifle there. A certain number of boys who were members of the College Cadet Corps were allowed to keep their rifles in their studies to keep them in a clean condition. They were not allowed to have ammunition; that would be a serious breach of the rules. The rules were placed in a prominent position in the College building, and in the armoury. Ammunition was only supplied to members of the Cadet Corps at the actual time they were going to shoot, and every shot is reported. It was quite impossible for boys to get shot from the armoury. None was kept there. The armoury was kept locked, under the care of the sergt-instructor. The police searched the deceased's study, and found some cartridges in a box there. Did not know that any special steps were taken to see that pupils did not have ammunition in their studies except that the rules were enforced, and it was highly improbably that they could get any there. Deceased was keen on shooting, and was going to compete in a house competition on Saturday last as a member of my house team. It was very  natural that he should have the rifle before shooting. The rifle produced was the one he would have used, but not the ammunition.

The rules were examined by the Coroner and it was found that they were very strict as to the possession of ammunition. Each competitor had so much ammunition given him, and they had to return unused ammunition. Witness added that the last time deceased shot at the Butts was on May 30 last. It was not necessary for those going to shoot at the Butts to have any previous practice.

Sergt.-Major HUNTER, instructor of the College Cadet Corps, said he had charge of the arms and ammunition. Arms were kept in the armoury, and ammunition in a magazine at West Malvern. He instructed the boys in shooting, and issued the ammunition to them, and was responsible for the return of that not used. On examining the cartridges found in deceased's study, he said they were of a different pattern to those now being used, and had not been used for some years. What they were using could be used both in the carbines and the rifles. The empty cases had to be collected and returned to Government. The rifle deceased [used] had a regulation pull of seven pounds and was in perfect order. Deceased was thoroughly well acquainted with the rifle. All had to shoot a number of rounds of blank cartridges before using the other.

ROBERT YATES, who occupied the same study as deceased, said Guy Yates and R. Hughes were also in the same study. This was the third term they had been there. They were all on good terms. He did not know that he had seen deceased since dinner time on Friday. He had occasion to go up into the study about 10 minutes to seven, as he came in from the cricket ground. He found the door shut, not locked. He opened the door, and immediately he did so he saw deceased lying partly over a chair on his right side with the rifle between his knees and the muzzle against his shoulder, and pointing to his head. The butt of the rifle was near his feet. Blood was pouring fast from his head. Witness at once rushed to the matron and told her what he had seen.

In reply to a Juryman, WITNESS said he heard the report of a rifle as he was going up the stairs. He never saw deceased touch his rifle while in the study, except to clean it or to show someone how it acted. Never saw him practice drill. Witness was a member of the Cadet Corps. He knew deceased had had some ammunition. He had it only this term. Did not know how much, but deceased told him he got it from where he used to shoot at home. He did not like to tell of deceased having the ammunition, although it was against the rules. Two or three days before Friday last deceased told witness that he was going to clean his rifle. Did not know whether any of the cartridges had been used. The ammunition was kept in his cleaning apparatus.

In reply to the foreman of the Jury, WITNESS said deceased never said anything about committing suicide; he seemed quite contented. The ammunition was not kept in a place where a master could see it.

ELLEN HARRYMAN, matron in Mr. Lyons's house, said the last witness informed her of the occurrence. She went there and found deceased still alive groaning fearfully and his head bleeding profusely, covering the right side of his face, which was blown away quite to the top of the head. She removed the rifle and called for assistance. Mr. Lyon and his man-servant soon came. Deceased was insensible, groaning and breathing being the only signs of life. Mr. A.O. Holbeche and Dr. Brockatt attended shortly afterwards. Deceased never recovered consciousness and died at about 8.15 p.m. Knew deceased well, and always found him happy and contented. In reply to a Juryman, she said she did not see any signs that the rifle had been cleaned.

Dr. H. BROCKATT said that when he arrived at the College, he saw at once that such injuries had been inflicted that the case was hopeless. The injuries were such as would be produced by a gunshot wound; the brain was protruding.

P.C. J. WALTERS said that there was a hole in the ceiling where the bullet went through. Found a box containing four cartridges, but no letters of any sort were found there. The cleaning apparatus was found in the car box with the cartridges, and this box was found in another larger one belonging to deceased.

Sergt.-Major HUNTER, re-called, said the rifle did not appear to have been cleaned, and in his opinion the cartridge appeared to have been in the rifle some time.

The CORONER, in addressing the Jury, pointed out that in his opinion there was nothing in the evidence to show that the boy committed suicide. He thought the practice of allowing a boy to keep a rifle in his study was to be deprecated.

The Jury, after retiring, were recalled by the Coroner to hear the evidence of Mr. Richardson, brother of the deceased, an expert with the rifle, who said that a rifle which had been foul or had got wet was liable to go off from being jarred. He gave several instance in which it had taken place.

The Jury, after retiring for a quarter of an hour, returned a verdict of "Accidental death," and added that they thought every precaution had been taken by the College authorities.

Worcestershire Chronicle, 1894-07-28
  "His body now rests in the cemetery whence you seem to look over the whole central plain of England. Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson 1837–1908; privately printed at Glasgow, 1911: 88
1920-06-08 administration granted at London to brother George Beigh Richardson; effects £226 18s. 9d. National Probate Calendar


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