Children of Charles Wallace and Alice Frances Jarvis

01. Daisy Alice Jarvis

1882-04-10 b. 99 New Road, Chatham, Kent birth certificate; censuses; GRO index
1891 scholar, of 170 New Road, Chatham TNA: RG 12/664 f5 p4
  went to St Paul's School, at the top of the hill; sang the Air 'Sing On' [the reminiscences of Mabel Elizabeth (Jarvis) Essenhigh]
1901 machinist (tailoring), of 110 Castle Road, Chatham RG 13/730 f9 p7
1905-01-30 of 142 Glencoe Road, Luton; m. Henry George Miller (1879–1964, engineer's fitter, HM Dockyard, b. Patter, Pembrokeshire), at St Peter's, Rochester, Kent parish register; GRO index; Marriage Locator; information from Janet & Michael Jarvis; Ancestry; RG 14/3894 RD47 ED10 SN195; RG 15/04035 RD47 SD47-1 ED10 SN245
Child: George Henry (1905–1994) RG 14/3894 RD47 ED10 SN195; GRO index
1911 with her family, boarding with Henry and Elizabeth Miller (her parents-in-law), and another boarder, in 6 rooms at 150 Rochester Avenue, Rochester RG 14/3894 RD47 ED10 SN195
1921 home duties; living in 6 rooms at 150 Rochester Avenue, Rochester, with her family and her parents-in-law RG 15/04035 RD47 SD47-1 ED10 SN245
1939-09-29 unpaid domestic duties, living with her husband (lathes turner) at 150 Rochester Ave., Rochester 1939 England and Wales Register (RG 101)
c. 1947

To get to them, we took the 66 bus from Davis Estate.  We always entered down their sloping back garden, into their kitchen.  The main sitting room of the house was below ground level to its front door, so it was very dark, and you could look up at people's feet and legs as they walked past on the pavement.  Daisy, by  this time about 65, was very deaf.  She spoke only in a whisper, but Uncle George could communicate with her with no problems, which I found surprising, because my father (Ivor) was also deaf, and even my mother had to shout to speak with him.  Uncle George was well disposed to me:  he allowed me, age 3 or 4, to look at his gold watch – but only at the back, not at the dial!  Then he would tease me to tell him the time!

David Cole (2021) 'Some recollections of the JARVIS family'
1960 Q2 d. Chatham RD GRO index


Charles Joseph Jarvis02. Charles Joseph Jarvis (Charlie)

1883-10-25 b. 170 New Road, Chatham, Kent birth certificate; censuses
1891 scholar, of 170 New Road, Chatham TNA: RG 12/664 f5 p4
  went to St Paul's School, at the top of the hill 'Sing On' [the reminiscences of Mabel Elizabeth (Jarvis) Essenhigh]
1901 photographer, worker, of 110 Castle Road, Chatham RG 13/730 f9 p7
1905-12-13 photographer, of New Brompton; m. 1. Florence Kate Colley (1883–1967, b. Gillingham, d. of Walter Edmund James and Caroline (White) Colley), at St Mark's, New Brompton, Kent; after banns GRO index; parish register; David Jarvis (n.d. [2009/10] My Life—a Latin Experience. Privately printed; PetrieJarvis2016
Children with first wife: Wallace Charles (1906–1973), Harold Frank (1909–1945), Kathleen F. (1913–1968) child's birth certificate; GRO index; Jarvis (2009/10); information from Bruce Petrie
1906 assurance agent, of 17 Nile Road, Gillingham child's birth certificate
1911 assurance agent, worker, of 13 Jeyes Rd, Gillingham RG14PN3946 RG78PN150 RD47 SD2 ED17 SN352
  5'9", with good eyesight, no physical defects and active letter from Ernest Edward Jarvis to Margaret Eleanor Beauvoisin, transcript by Dominic Beauvoisin
1920/1961 secretary of the Gillingham Liberal Club Jarvis family tree
1921 assurance agent, working for Pearl Assurance Co., High Holborn, London, at 11a Kingswood Villas, Gillingham; living in 5 rooms at 21 Nile Road, G'ham, with his family and a boarder RG 15/04090 RD47 SD2 ED20 SN178
1926 or c. 1931 divorced Larry Tyrell; PetrieJarvis2016
1935 Q4 m. 2. Caroline Mary Teresa Bolton (nιe Scott, 1905–1968), Medway RD GRO index; Jarvis family tree
Child with second wife: Corrinne J. (1936 – ?) GRO index
1936-03-11 insurance agent; administrator of father's estate National Probate Calendar
1939-09-29 assurance agent, living with his wife and daughter at 21 Nile Rd, Gillingham 1939 England and Wales Register (RG 101)
c. 1963 annexe to the Gillingham Liberal Club, in Canterbury Street, named 'The Jarvis Suite' in his honour Jarvis family tree
1966-07-10 "JARVIS Charles James, otherwise Charles Joseph", of 21 Nile Road, Gillingham; d. at Medway Hospital, Gillingham GRO index; National Probate Calendar
1966-08-17 will proved at London by Wallace Charles Jarvis and Norah Jarvis; £5763 National Probate Calendar


03. Mabel Elizabeth Jarvis (May)

1885-08-07 b. 170 New Road, Chatham, Kent birth certificate; censuses; 1939 England and Wales Register (TNA: RG 101), giving 1885-08-13
1891 scholar, of 170 New Road, Chatham RG 12/664 f5 p4
  sang alto; enjoyed reciting, including 'Somebody's Mother'; sang 'O Rest in the Lord', and joined in the family singing in the Unitarian Church, Chatham; joined the Choral Society; sang the solos in Rossini's 'Stabat Mater', Mozart's 'Twelfth Mass', and Mendelssohn's 'I Waited for the Lord' 'Sing On' [the reminiscences of Mabel Elizabeth (Jarvis) Essenhigh]
  really happy at school—at the Grove Road, Luton Road, Chatham 'Sing On'
c. 1898 sang in a Chatham Co-op choir
1901 presser (tailor's), of 110 Castle Road, Chatham RG 13/730 f9 p7
  husband-to-be sang tenor in the Co-op choir

One Sunday afternoon we were sitting up on a high bank overlooking the river, this was at Borstal, near Rochester, and I said, "Oh what a lovely view"—he said, "I'm not looking at the river, but at you". I said "Oh! are you," turned my back and moved a bit further down the bank, after a time I felt a poke in my back with his walking-stick, and he said "How would you like me for a husband". It quite took my breath away as I was so surprised, I said "alright" for I certainly was not in love with him, only friends and didn't really know what to answer. Anyhow, he was very pleased with my answer.

Well things went on just the same, for a few years, of course, by this time I was engaged and was married later on.

'Sing On'
1908 Q3 m. William Robert Taylor Essenhigh (1883–1960, joiner, HM Dockyard, b. Chatham), Medway RD GRO index; RG14PN3906 RG78PN149 RD47 SD1 ED22 SN274; RG 15/04047 RD47 SD47-1 ED22 SN150
Child: Ella May (1909–2006), b. Chatham GRO index; information from Margery O'Gorman, 2006, and Dominic Beauvoisin, 2009
1911 of 45 Beaconsfield Rd, Chatham; 6 rooms RG14PN3906 RG78PN149 RD47 SD1 ED22 SN274
  acutely conscious of the limits of her education, while inordinately proud of her own and her immediate family's musical prowess David Cole (2021) 'Some recollections of the JARVIS family'
1921 home duties; living with her family in 5 rooms at 45 Beaconsfield Rd, Chatham RG 15/04047 RD47 SD47-1 ED22 SN150
c. 1921 joined another Choral Society, but eventually gave it up because of sore throats and having her daughter to see to 'Sing On'
  wrote her reminiscences, privately printed as 'Sing On' 'Sing On'; Cole (2021)
1939-09-29 unpaid household duties, living with her husband (dockyard joiner) at 45 Beaconsfield Rd, Chatham 1939 England and Wales Register (RG 101)
 

May was nicely built, fairly tall and nice looking until about 70. A fine contralto, she was a member of the famous Monday's choir of Rochester. She was of a happy disposition, her hearing slowly failed her after 70 so she took to a hearing aid.

letter from Ernest Edward Jarvis to Margaret Eleanor Beauvoisin, transcript by Dominic Beauvoisin
 

The house, a small Victorian villa, had an outside toilet, with squares of newspaper for toilet paper – this was wartime or immediately after! Aunt May was deaf, and had a hearing aid, which she couldn't master:  it squeaked a lot.  My second cousin, Peter, 2 years older than me, her grandson, would unsympathetically pick up the receiver and say 'Calling All Cars!' – which he thought was very funny, but I doubt if Aunt May did.  She was intensely keen on music, and continued to sing, quaveringly, when nobody wanted to listen.

Cole (2021)
1960-12-22 husband of 45 Beaconsfield Road, Chatham, at the date of his death National Probate Calendar
1961-02-03 administrator of her husband's estate
  after her husband's death, went to live with their daughter at 54 Princes View, Dartford; "I don't think she was very happy there – the pace of life was  too frantic." Cole (2021)
1966-02-16 of 54 Princes View, Dartford, Kent; d. at Joyce Green Hospital, Dartford GRO index; National Probate Calendar
1966-03-24 administration granted at London to Ella May Clare; £1200 National Probate Calendar


04. Lottie Maud Jarvis

1887-02-04 b. 170 New Road, Chatham, Kent birth certificate; censuses
1891 scholar, of 170 New Road, Chatham TNA: RG 12/664 f5 p4
1901 presser (tailor's), of 110 Castle Road, Chatham RG 13/730 f9 p7
1911 housemaid (domestic), Admiralty, worker, in household of Frank Bradshaw, tent surgeon, Royal Navy, of 9 The Terrace, H.M. Dockyard, Chatham; 12 rooms RG14PN3899 RG78PN149 RD47 SD1 ED15 SN318 
1911 Q2 m. Walter Leonard Greenwood (1886–1946, shipwright, Chatham Dockyard), Medway RD GRO index; information from Dominic Beauvoisin, 2009
Children: Walter Edward (1912–1943), Muriel Lottie (1913–1941), Joyce Winifred (1915–1999) GRO index; information from Margery O'Gorman, 2006, and Dominic Beauvoisin, 2009
1937-02-17 d. Medway RD—hit by a bicycle, and killed when her head hit the kerb GRO index

GREENWOOD—In ever loving memory of Lottie Maud Greenwood, who passed on, February 17th, 1937. She had a smile for all.—From her devoted husband, Wal. "Tanglewood," King George-road, Walderslade.

GREENWOOD—In memory of our dear mother, whom we lost two year ago, February 17th, 1937.—Joyce, Bill.

Chatham News, 1939-02-17
 

The other sad case was my sister Lottie. With no complaints herself, able and musical, she married a man with fits and heart trouble in the family. They had a son and two daughters. The son, Walter Greenwood, became a teacher. Before this, Lottie was knocked down by a bicycle on a steep hill. Her head hit the kerb and she was killed outright . . . .

letter from Ernest Edward Jarvis to Margaret Eleanor Beauvoisin, transcript by Dominic Beauvoisin


05. Percy Varrall Jarvis (Hawkeye)

1889-11-07 b. 170 New Road, Chatham, Kent birth certificate; censuses
1891 of 170 New Road, Chatham TNA: RG 12/664 f5 p4
  full of mischief, as a child; sang in the church choir, drawing pictures when not singing; fond of white rats 'Sing On' [the reminiscences of Mabel Elizabeth (Jarvis) Essenhigh]
  favourite sibling of his sister Daisy David Cole (2021) 'Some recollections of the JARVIS family'
1901 living with family at 110 Castle Road, Chatham RG 13/730 f9 p7
  went to an Art school; very fond of music; took violin lessons and could play very nicely 'Sing On'
1911 ship painter, Admiralty dockyd, worker, of 106 Glencoe Rd, Chatham; 6 rooms RG14PN3922 RG78PN149 RD47 SD1 ED38 SN339
  5'8", with good eyesight, no physical defects and active letter from Ernest Edward Jarvis to Margaret Eleanor Beauvoisin, transcript by Dominic Beauvoisin
1917 Q2 m. Eleanor Alexander (1893–1963, d. of Harry and Emily Alexander), Medway RD GRO index; Dom Beauvoisin gedcom, 2008
1918-10-25 appointed painter, Admiralty, H.M. Dockyards and Naval Establishments, without competition The Edinburgh Gazette, 1918-11-08
1921-05-25 arrived Halifax, Nova Scotia, aboard the SS Caronia; proceeding to Bermuda; painter, intended occupation chargeman of painters, Unitarian, in possession of £100, passage paid by Admiralty (employer); had completed Form 30A on 1921-05-10 Canada, Ocean Arrivals
Children: Margaret (c. 1925 – 1925), Margaret Eleanor (1927–2013, b. Bermuda) GRO index; Dom Beauvoisin gedcom, 2008
1929-05-15 painter; with wife and daughter, arrived Southampton aboard the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company's SS Avon, from Bermuda via Cherbourg; proposed address The Cot, Burnham Downs, Chatham; country of last permanent residence Bermuda UK Incoming Passenger Lists
1939-09-29 not found in 1939 Register 1939 England and Wales Register (RG 101)
1949-05-18 foreman of painters at Portsmouth Dockyard; awarded the Imperial Service Medal Portsmouth Evening News
1953-08-15 at the annual show of Waterlooville and Cowplain Allotment and Garden Association, held in the Waterloo Hall, in the members' class, won third prize for tomatoes Portsmouth Evening News, 1953-08-17
1955-08-05 at the annual exhibition of Cosham Art Group, at Court Lane School, Cosham, "'Head of a young woman' is a good indication of P.V. Jarvis's work, in the sculpture and carving section" [ . . . ] Portsmouth Evening News, 1953-08-06
1956-02-17 secretary of the Horndean Art Group, a branch of Horndean Community Association Hampshire Telegraph
1956-06-30 at the Horndean Community Association fete:

Mr. P.V. Jarvis (Secretary of the Art Group) said that trade on the group's stall was slow, although occasionally there was a rush.

"People do not think oil paintings are worth the money any more," he added.

Hampshire Telegraph, 1956-07-06
1956 of Havant, Hampshire;

Percy was obviously a considerable artist:  sculptures, heads of women, decorated the edges of his garden's extensive lawns.  In a manner I'm sure reminiscent of his boyhood teasing of Kate, he told Christine, he was waiting for them to grow – he hadn't planted them long! There was a piano, with the Schumann piano quintet on the stand, which Percy and friends intended  to rehearse later;  I assume he played violin.

Cole (2021)
1962-05-27 of 22 Park Lane, Cowplain, Hampshire; d. Cowplain, Hampshire National Probate Calendar; Lynda Rooke gedcoms, 2008 & 2009
1962-07-20 will proved at London by Barclays Bank Limited; effects £1655 19s. 8d. National Probate Calendar


06. Marjorie Ethel Jarvis (Madge)

1890-06-17 b. 170 New Road, Chatham, Kent birth certificate; censuses
1891 of 170 New Road, Chatham TNA: RG 12/664 f5 p4
  fond of animals 'Sing On' [the reminiscences of Mabel Elizabeth (Jarvis) Essenhigh]
1901 living with family at 110 Castle Road, Chatham RG 13/730 f9 p7
1911 tailoress, [in business of: ] tailor, worker, of 106 Glencoe Rd, Chatham; 6 rooms RG14PN3922 RG78PN149 RD47 SD1 ED38 SN339
1916 Q3 m. Samuel William Fenton Hicks (1889–1967, shipwright, HM Dockyard Chatham, b. Sheerness on Sea, Isle of Sheppey, Kent), in Medway RD GRO index; Ancestry; RG 15/04091 RD47 SD2 ED21 SN450
Children: Phyllis Marjorie (1917–2005), Joyce Ella (1919–2012), Dorothy Kathleen (1920–2008), Norah A. (1923–1948), Marjorie J. (1925–1926), Francis (1927–1974), twins (? – ?, d. in infancy) GRO index; information from Margery O'Gorman, 2006; Rundle - Bizzanelli Family Tree
1921 living with her family in 5 rooms at 12 Pretoria Rd, Gillingham, Kent RG 15/04091 RD47 SD2 ED21 SN450
1939-09-29 not found in 1939 Register 1939 England and Wales Register (RG 101)
c. 1947

. . . I was well aware that she and her husband were no longer on good terms.  On one occasion, when I was about 7, she arrived on our doorstep in carpet slippers.  Their house, 'Faraway' (see below) was about two miles away from ours, and down a steep, unadopted road – hence the name!  She said, 'He's locked me out!'   I also knew that Uncle Sam was into drink:  my mother and I often met him on Friday nights, as we caught a late-evening bus from Chatham after a choir rehearsal.  Kate would pretend not to see him.

David Cole (2021) 'Some recollections of the JARVIS family'
 

Madge was not my mother's favourite sister, partly because of her voice!  Madge had a harsh, scratchy soprano, but (like so many of the family!) was convinced that she was a beautiful singer, and couldn't understand why nobody  else thought so.  She would often ask my mother to play for her.

Madge had a way of cadging things – lifts, cups of sugar – which my father resented.  Not knowing her circumstances, I tended to agree with him, I'm now ashamed to say. 

1958 Q1 d. Chatham RD GRO index


Ernest Edward Jarvis07. Ernest Edward Jarvis (Ern)

1893-04-15 b. 170 New Road, Chatham, Kent birth certificate; censuses
  recited 'Boys Rights' 'Sing On' [the reminiscences of Mabel Elizabeth (Jarvis) Essenhigh]
1901 living with family at 110 Castle Road, Chatham TNA: RG 13/730 f9 p7
1911 shipwright iron, Admiralty dockyd, worker, of 106 Glencoe Rd, Chatham; 6 rooms RG14PN3922 RG78PN149 RD47 SD1 ED38 SN339
1915-11-04 shipwright, of H.M.S. Prince; m. Alice Mary Recordia Mist (1897–1982, b. Gillingham, Kent, d. Tom and Agatha Mist), at Christ Church, Camberwell, London; after banns GRO index; parish register; RG 15/04068 RD47 SD47-1 ED43 SN71
Children: Alan Barry (1917–1997), Brian Hugh (1918–2004), Hilary Juania (1920–1958) GRO index; RG 15/04068 RD47 SD47-1 ED43 SN71; information from Malcolm Jarvis
1920-06-04 appointed shipwright, Admiralty: H.M. Dockyards and Naval Establishments, without competition The London Gazette, 1920-06-04
1921 shipwright employed in building & rep: of H.M. ships, working for construction manager, H.M. Dockyard @ Chatham, at H.M. Dockyard Chatham; living with his family in 5 rooms at 116 Glencoe Rd, Chatham RG 15/04068 RD47 SD47-1 ED43 SN71
1939-05-12

Mr. E.E. Jarvis (shipwright) Chatham, has been appointed assistant (ship) overseer, grade 2, on the staff of the P.S.O. Greenock.

Chatham News
1939-09-29 not found in 1939 Register; wife (midwife K.C.C.) living at 14 Symons Ave, Chatham 1939 England and Wales Register (RG 101)
1962/1965 had a hut as a weekend retreat at Walderslade, where he kept bees, and made very satisfactory honey David Cole (2021) 'Some recollections of the JARVIS family'

He spent a lot of the time in the hut, by himself:  he was estranged from his wife, Alice.  I don't think they were divorced, but they no longer lived in the same house.  Uncle Ern's trade was as a shipwright.  'Faraway' had an upstairs, but no staircase, only a slingsby ladder, let down into the kitchen when you needed to go 'upstairs' , which was furnished as a bedroom with a small bathroom beyond.  Uncle Ern made and fitted a staircase for us, rising from the corner of the sitting-room.  I don't even remember paying him for doing it.  But he also  tended to come and sit, or come and yarn, sometimes for hours or whole evenings, which for newly-weds, each with a demanding job, wasn't always convenient! I do remember playing to him the tape of my Downing performance of 'Hail, Bright Cecilia' of Purcell.  He listened attentively to '' Tis Nature's Voice' , expressed no surprise at my counter-tenor voice, and asked 'When are you going to break into the air?' A very astute comment, I thought! My mother dismissed my alto singing as 'a fad' , but I believe one of her own uncles 'took the alto' in family music-making, so for Ern it was nothing new. I know he played the violin, and even the bagpipes, but I never heard him play. I never met his wife, or any of his children. Like so many of the family, he was deaf, but (as he says himself) managed his hearing aid adroitly.

1965-01-25 of 11 Buller Road, Chatham; wrote to his brother Charlie letter from Ernest Edward Jarvis to Charles Joseph Jarvis, in the possession of Corrinne Noot
1969

I have had several people staying here at times with children and my writing desk has needed to be kept closed, also TV usually on, some my compositions have been nil also my violin playing. Anyway in Chatham one can't buy violin strings. The last shop that sold them Lloyd and Langtons closed years ago and his son, a scientist, married my son Brian's daughter Sandra. Brian, by the way, is a printer now. His younger daughter was top of Bristol College and was invited to stay on for another term, but married a computer expert instead. Her name's Susan. His son Malcolm (about 20) is clever and doing well.

I badly need a decent bow for my violin, but none are to be found. Maybe a musician will furnish one. I shall be alone here shortly for a time at least, so it will be sons TV, sons youngster and sons dogs barking, so may resume writing and violin playing. I can still, like my father, lift my voice in song.

I am sorry to say that I may soon be the only one left of my family as my youngest brother, Stan, is very ill and not expected to live long. My sister Kate, a fine contralto, pianist and organ player, died unexpectedly this year of haemorrhage after a kidney operation. Her first illness.

Me? Have a gift of rapid recovery from my full share of illness, mostly from my work and injury such as nearly losing my right arm, torn out and completely paralysed and wasted to bare bone. Hospital doctors verdict was "never use it again". Ward Sisters opinion "I may get it moving but it may take a long time". How long? Six weeks? Six months? No 12 months. I nearly died of shock, but I was back at work in six months.

Have the family complaint of music. At school 12 years of age, we had tonic-sol-fah for test. First boy with right notes, home five minutes early, me every time. One day the Master having felt like singing for he sang the Irish Emigrant (off to Philadelphia in the morning). I'd never heard it before but he asked for the right notes, gave them right away, and the Master let me go home right away. At a later school something left "myneheer Van Dunk was sung in four part chorus. Having a good natural voice I sang the top line, but the bottom line, a brass solo, goes very deep, and I had to sing that, being the only boy who could sing low enough.

Well, at 77½, I am still strong and active and probably annoy the neighbours when I burst into song without ceremony. Hilda is always harping on deafness in the family, but we are not all deaf and none were born deaf, so before it makes its presence, we speak good English, even musical.

Passed A1 in medical exam, we' re well built and above average height. I was measured at 5'10½" for the army. A1 and perfect eyesight. My younger brother, Frank, was the same height, Percy about 5"8 and called Hawkeye, Charlie and Stan about 5"9 all with good eyesight, no physical defects and active.

My son Barry is a trifle taller than me and very strong, no trace of deafness, any other complaints, eyesight excellent. Brian 5"9, no complaints, his three children well above average intelligence, no defects. Our family of ten grew up strong, healthy and able. All of them.

Frank (Ginger) my junior by a year or two courted a girl whose family was riddled with consumption (TB). They parted company too late. Frank now had it. He was shown her body in her coffin by her mother, which upset him. He fought the complaint and would have beaten it, but war was on and food very short, and with the war, unemployment and near starvation, he was 27 when he died.

The other sad case was my sister Lottie. With no complaints herself, able and musical, she married a man with fits and heart trouble in the family. They had a son and two daughters. The son, Walter Greenwood, became a teacher. Before this, Lottie was knocked down by a bicycle on a steep hill. Her head hit the kerb and she was killed outright so she mercifully missed what followed a few years later. Walter Senior, a Shipwright in the dockyard, began to have fits when at work. His cousin had the same trouble and both had to leave the yard. Walter Junior became a teacher, a six footer, Lottie's pride, but one day he fell onto the floor in a fit when at the blackboard in front of his class. He died at 28, but composed his genealogical tree, both his father's and Lottie's before he died, a fine piece of work.

The family's troubles were not ended. Walter Senior, apart from fits, developed heart trouble and died.

Just two left, Muriel and Joyce. Joyce, a tall red head (copper) like Lottie and my mother when young. Muriel, not so robust as Joyce, was a teacher and engaged to be married but developed an incurable complaint. With her days numbered, her fiancι decided on a quick marriage. Quite a nice wedding, and I was there. Muriel was quite happy, and looking pretty in her white bridal dress. She lasted for six months.

Joyce, the sole survivor, has no complaints, no sign of deafness, and married Bill Wake. He got promoted in the dockyard and was sent abroad a good deal. When at Gibraltar a year or two ago, a co-op singing festival was on. Joyce decided to enter, paid her own fare from Gib and back, and won the soprano first prize.

They may have one or two more in the family. Janet was 25 when this picture was in the local paper. She is now married to an Australian serviceman. Joyce's son is doing well.

Deafness in a family is not such a terrible thing. There are many things worse, even blindness. Beethoven became very deaf, yet composed great music. Churchill also became somewhat deaf in later years. Nowadays it can be prevented or a hearing aid worn.

You say your offspring are short like your hubby but there are a lot of big folk on both your fathers and mothers side and perhaps your hubbies.

Hilda's family have no music in them. She herself has your eyesight, very short and heavily built and has had heart trouble for years, so why she passes disparaging remarks about my sister May's fiddling about with her hearing aid. May was nicely built, fairly tall and nice looking until about 70. A fine contralto, she was a member of the famous Monday's choir of Rochester. She was of a happy disposition, her hearing slowly failed her after 70 so she took to a hearing aid. She died at 81 and left her mark on Ella, her daughter, who is a professional teacher of singing and piano forte, also on Ella's daughter, Jean, who has May's good looks and is a school teacher of music, as is also Ella's son. None of these show any signs of deafness.

Don't think that I'm a miserable old blighter. I have a lodger at present with 3 kiddies, 2 boys 1 girl. A fine warm evening today and he was sitting on the step with his little daughter (6½) and our next door neighbours kiddies. Several more gathered round and they started singing, a lively school song, I beat time. Now Vicky, my cat, is a favourite with the kids, she also likes me to pick her up and give her a dance, I did this to the kiddies delight, but then they formed a ring on the grass, I had to be one of the dancing ring, finishing by me having to lift each one high above my head. Not easy job with the smallest over 4 stones. Luckily for me it was now bedtime for them. However, I felt no signs of heart failure at such unwanted exertion.

Love to all the family. 

From Uncle Ern

letter from Ernest Edward Jarvis to Margaret Eleanor Beauvoisin, transcript by Dominic Beauvoisin
1972-02-20 d. Sittingbourne GRO index; information from Malcolm Jarvis


08. Francis Hugh Jarvis (Frank, Ginger)

1895-12-25 b. 254 New Road, Chatham, Kent birth certificate; censuses
1901 living with family at 110 Castle Road, Chatham TNA: RG 13/730 f9 p7
1911 labourer rope maker, Admiralty dockyd, worker, of 106 Glencoe Rd, Chatham; 6 rooms RG14PN3922 RG78PN149 RD47 SD1 ED38 SN339
  5'10½", with good eyesight, no physical defects and active letter from Ernest Edward Jarvis to Margaret Eleanor Beauvoisin, transcript by Dominic Beauvoisin
1921 skilled labourer, employed by H.M Dockyard, Chatham; living with his family in 4 rooms at 116 Glencoe Rd, Chatham RG 15/04068 RD47 SD47-1 ED43 SN70
1922 Q1 d. Medway RD, of consumption GRO index

letter from Ernest Edward Jarvis to Margaret Eleanor Beauvoisin

 

Frank (Ginger) my junior by a year or two courted a girl whose family was riddled with consumption (TB). They parted company too late. Frank now had it. He was shown her body in her coffin by her mother, which upset him. He fought the complaint and would have beaten it, but war was on and food very short, and with the war, unemployment and near starvation, he was 27 when he died.


09. Kate Elsie Jarvis

1897-01-01 b. 254 Luton Road, Chatham, Kent birth certificate; censuses

She was born on January 1, but her certificate shows her birthday as January 15:  family tradition suggests, her father Charles was lax about registering yet another baby before the legal deadline!  She never had a birthday celebration:  it was always lumped in with Christmas!

David Cole (2021) 'Some recollections of the JARVIS family'
1901 living with family at 110 Castle Road, Chatham TNA: RG 13/730 f9 p7
  encouraged by the organist of Rochester Cathedral, Hylton Stewart, to take her singing seriously Cole (2021)
  got a gold medal for singing, and a silver for reciting; was chosen to sing the principal part in the school play 'Sing On' [the reminiscences of Mabel Elizabeth (Jarvis) Essenhigh]
1911 tailoress, [in business of:] tailor, worker, of 106 Glencoe Rd, Chatham; 6 rooms RG14PN3922 RG78PN149 RD47 SD1 ED38 SN339
c. 1920

She was engaged, at about 23, but her fiancι deserted her, leaving for America and promising to send for her, but never doing so.  A long-standing friend, Anne Jenner, told Christine that Kate 'made herself look ridiculous' by wearing Jack's ring for so long when it was clear he wasn't coming to honour his promise.  (She still carried it in her purse when I was small.)

Cole (2021)
1921 tailoress, employed by Taylor's, High Street, Chatham; living with her family in 4 rooms at 116 Glencoe Rd, Chatham RG 15/04068 RD47 SD47-1 ED43 SN70
c. 1924 presented with an edition of Beethoven's piano sonatas, "by the choir of All Souls Church, Hamond Hill, Chatham in token of services rendered".  She had taken over from the organist, one Mr Daniels, at short notice when he fell ill, and played for weeks with success." Cole (2021)
1930 Q4 m. Ivor Lewis Cole (1907–1986), in Medway RD GRO index
c. 1931/2 had built 'Mushroom Mead' , Watson Avenue, Chatham, later known as 2 Watson Avenue Cole (2021)
1939-09-29 unpaid domestic, living with her husband (engineer fitter, HM Dockyard gun sec[ . . . ], living at Mushroom Mead, Watson Avenue, Chatham 1939 England and Wales Register (RG 101)
Children: Sylvia Frances (1933–1933) and David I. (1940 – after 1962), both b. Medway RD GRO index; information from Margery O'Gorman, 2006
  "My mother, much influenced by the Pacifist Unitarian cleric, Will Hayes, allowed no violence in the house." Cole (2021)
had no car, while the family was growing up

She always had grey hair, in my time, and false teeth:  the standard 1930s-style dentectomy took place when I was about 4, and her false teeth cause her much distress, because they didn't fit securely.  She had a deep distrust of officials:  doctors, lawyers, headmasters:  they would think her inferior and not worth  talking to.  She never ate in restaurants or rode in taxis, or travelled abroad.  She even disliked her own name – 'Kate Cole' ! she used to say contemptuously, and never took up my suggestion of being known as Elsie!

My mother suspected ever afterwards that the baby died because they could only afford the cheapest form of maternity care. Her mother-in-law, my Welsh grandmother, a strict Baptist, told her it was because the baby 'had  come into an ungodly house.' It was 10 years before she became pregnant again. She wanted a girl, and was disappointed to hear she had a boy – by caesarean section, I believe, because my ears stuck out in childhood!

played, in public, for choirs:  Rochester Co-op, junior and senior, playing 'Messiah' 'Elijah' and so on
c. 1952

Her finest hour as a musician was probably with me.  I auditioned successfully at the age of 12, a boy soprano, (my mother of course accompanying) to perform in 'Young Musicians Entertain' or something similar on 'Children's Hour' on radio – the 'Blue Peter' of its day – and we travelled to London, to Broadcasting House, and met the luminaries of the programme, face-to-face!  But, still better, the BBC gave me, not a place on 'Children's Hour' but a real gig!  'This is Christmas' on Home Service, Christmas 1952, with Owen Brannigan (the first Noye in Britten's 'Noyes Fludde' ) among the other soloists! She was able to converse with the professionals, like conductor Stanford Robinson, as the programme was recorded, and we later listened to the broadcast, at the Warriners' house, on Christmas Day!

c. 1956

When she was 59 she fell into a trench which he had dug in the garden while she was out, and injured her foot. Typical of her luck with medics, the injury was not properly diagnosed as a fracture for weeks, so she was permanently disabled by it.

c. 1961

Uncle Ern calls her 'a fine contralto' , but it wasn't so.  Her voice was an untrained mezzo, which might have become a contralto – a popular voice in the period, given Clara Butt and Queen Victoria.  When she was about 64, she and I competed in some Coop Festival, with 'Von Ewiger Liebe' of Brahms ( in English).  She sang, I played. As she said, it was the only time she'd had someone to play for her!

 

I think, despite her large number of siblings, for much of her life, my mother was lonely.  She had little in common with her husband, and nothing with his family.

 

Kate was generous to a fault.  Her guru was the pacifist Unitarian cleric, Will Hayes, and sometimes she was exploited as a result,  opening the house to quite unsuitable people whom he (and his sidekick, Inge Hyde) thought needed help.  They thought Mrs Misfit needed help;  my mother actually gave it, even at cost of her own comfort. But she welcomed my girlfriend, fiancιe and then wife Christine with open arms.  She was almost the daughter she never had. She said, 'Well, I've done my best!  He  respects women, and he can press his own trousers!'

1969-08-03 of 2 Watson Av., Chatham; d. Chatham RD GRO index; Find a will
1969 "My sister Kate, a fine contralto, pianist and organ player, died unexpectedly this year of haemorrhage after a kidney operation. Her first illness." letter to Margaret Eleanor Beauvoisin, transcript by Dominic Beauvoisin
1969-09-30 administration Brighton; £4811; the situation became complicated, because while David had registered letters of administration Ivor had registered an intestacy: Kate's own will was legally invalid Find a will; Cole (2021)


Stanley William Jarvis10. Stanley William Jarvis (Stan)

1899-03-08 b. 110 Castle Road, Chatham, Kent birth certificate; censuses
1901 living with family at 110 Castle Road, Chatham TNA: RG 13/730 f9 p7
1911 school, of 106 Glencoe Rd, Chatham; 6 rooms RG14PN3922 RG78PN149 RD47 SD1 ED38 SN339
1921 labourer (ex soldier), unemployed; living with his family in 4 rooms at 116 Glencoe Rd, Chatham RG 15/04068 RD47 SD47-1 ED43 SN70
  5'9", with good eyesight, no physical defects and active letter from Ernest Edward Jarvis to Margaret Eleanor Beauvoisin, transcript by Dominic Beauvoisin
1939 Q1 m. Hilda Bessie Perry (1908–1980, b. Gillingham), Medway RD GRO index; RG14/3955 RD47 ED26 Sch. 163
1939-09-29 G.P.O. staff (cleaner) heavy worker, living with his wife at 5 Glebe Rd, Gillingham, Kent 1939 England and Wales Register (RG 101)
Children: Shirley A. (1940 – before 2006, b. Medway RD) and Frank (1943–2008, b. Chatham RD) GRO index
  "There were very few books in the house, and not even much furniture!" David Cole (2021) 'Some recollections of the JARVIS family'
 

They also came quite often to 'Mushroom Mead.'   My father tolerated Stan, or he  tolerated my father.  Together they dug out and fitted up the fishpond which graced the front  garden – I think they were both out of work at the time, and it gave a delusion of employment.  My impression was that Stan was sometimes out of work even when generally employment had improved, post-War. 

1969 . . . "my youngest brother, Stan, is very ill and not expected to live long." letter from Ernest Edward Jarvis to Margaret Eleanor Beauvoisin
1970 Q3 d. Chatham RD GRO index


11. child Jarvis

before 1911 b. RG14PN3922 RG78PN149 RD47 SD1 ED38 SN339
before 1911 d.
1901/1911 Jarvis births after 1901 with deaths before 1911, all in Medway RD, are: William (1901–1901), Arthur (1903–1903), Arthur Charles (1905–1907), Lilian May (1906–1907) and Gladys Blanche (1907–1908). Given that Alice Frances Jarvis was 40 when her last surviving child was born, the infant who died was probably William. GRO index


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This page was last revised on 2022-05-14.

 

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