The Binns family of Crawshawbooth and Sunderland

 

 If you are interested in the Binns family, you should check out www.thebinnsfamily.org.uk

 

Joseph Binns = Isabel Burton

     |         other children

David Binns = Ann Robinson

      |         other children

George Binns = Margaret Watson

      |         other children

Lucy Binns = William Pollard

      |         other children

Francis Edward Pollard = Mary Spence Watson

 

K1. LUCY POLLARD born BINNS

Lucy (Binns) Pollard

Lucy Pollard was born in Sunderland on the 14th August 1830.1

From 1839 to 1845 she attended the Friends' school at Ackworth, Yorkshire, otherwise continuing resident in Sunderland.2

signature of Lucy BinnsIn April 1848 she started as an apprentice teacher at Croydon School, in the days of its superintendent John Sharp, where she met [I3] William Pollard, who was one of the junior masters. From 1850 or 1851 we have a fleeting glimpse of her in a contemporary diary letter: "Fifth day meeting at Wandsworth. A fly with P. Bedford appeared at the gate in the morning and bore away Hannah Sharp, A. Gardner and Lucy Binns." In the 1851 census she appears as an apprentice at Park Lane School, Croydon. On the 12th January 1854—after William had become a master at Ackworth—they married, at the Nile Street meeting house in Sunderland. At that date she was living in Frederick Street, Bishopwearmouth. In old age, she recorded, of the birth of their first child Mary Sophia in 1854, "Isn't it lovely to lie and gaze upon one's very own firstborn?" The couple had ten children: Mary Sophia (1854–1935), Lucy (1856–1939), Ellen (1857–1858), Bedford (1858–1945), Albert (1860–1902), William Henry (1862–1923), Eliza (1866–1938), Constance (1867–1871), Arthur Binns (1870–1949), and [I2] Francis Edward (1872–1951); the first six were born in Ackworth, the others in Reigate.3

In 1861 her home was on the road leading to Carr Bridge, Low Ackworth, Ackworth; the household kept two servants, including a nursemaid. In June 1864 she advertised in The British Friend, looking for "a competent young woman as a nursemaid, who will board with the family." In 1871 she was living in Holmesdale Road, Reigate, with five children and one servant. In June that year her daughter Constance died at Reigate, aged 3½.4

Her eldest son, Bedford, recorded an unusual incident of his mother's early married life:

 

Whether it was before my time or during my infancy, a strange experience of my mother's is worth recording. She was out walking with my father and suddenly exclaimed, "O, I'm sure something has happened." They hurried home and found one of my sisters bleeding badly from a cut. Many years later, when the same daughter, then married, was 'expecting', my mother, one night, suffered the experiences of childbirth simultaneously with the arrival of a grandchild.5

In October 1878 "Mrs. Wm. Pollard, Holmefield, Sale, Manchester", was among the list of people willing to receive contributions for the Ashworth Memorial Chapel for the Destitute, which would carry on Adult & Juvenile Sunday Schools, Mothers' Meetings, Band of Hope, and other work. In 1881 she was living at 9 Holmefield, Sale, Cheshire, with her family and a general servant. By 1882, however, she had moved to Eccles, where in 1887 she was living in Oak Cottage. In 1891 she was resident at Drayton Lodge, Clarendon Road, Eccles, with one son still at home, and a single general domestic servant.6

On 14 December 1893, by the terms of her late husband's will, she inherited £50 and the use during her widowhood of his furniture and household effects and the income of all the residue of his property.7

By early April 1896 she was living in Thongsbridge, Yorkshire, but moved to Ackworth in 1898.8

About 1900, she recorded her excitement at the latest news of the Boer War, commenting "I feel a decided Pro Boer!" She had attended the previous Yearly Meeting.9

By July of 1900 she had moved to Bentinck Villa, High Ackworth, Ackworth. She had a maid, at Ackworth; the 1901 census records her there, living on means, with one general servant. She was still giving a great deal of domestic attention to her unmarried son Frank, who was by now in his late twenties.10

Quaker marriage certificate for William Pollard and Lucy Binns (with apologies for the poor focus)

William & Lucy Pollard and family, before 1872

William and Lucy Pollard and family, before 1872

Lucy (Binns) Pollard at Bentinck Villa

Lucy Pollard at Bentinck Villa

Lucy (Binns) Pollard

In September 1903 she was delighted at the news of Frank's engagement. The Christmas and New Year of 1903/4 she spent in Scarborough. By May of 1904 she was becoming rather melancholy at the prospect of no longer having anyone to look after, apparently rather enjoying darning Frank's socks, which Mary would be doing after his marriage. Lucy was present at their wedding in Newcastle in August that year; she gave the couple a chesterfield sofa, as a wedding present. She later stayed three days with the couple at the beginning of October.11

In the middle of 1905 she was suffering from eye trouble, which was a considerable affliction, as she read a lot.12

In June 1906 she attended Ackworth General Meeting, wheeled there in her bath chair. The first week in September that year found her staying at Colwyn Bay, where on the 3rd it is recorded that she sat in the pier pavilion for two hours, listening to the band.13

In February 1907 she gave her baby grandson Robert S.W. Pollard £5 for his Post Office savings account. At the end of June that year she spent a week with Frank and Mary Pollard in York, signing the visitors' book as "Mother Pollard". She made her will on the 21st January 1908.14

On Saturday the 4th April 1908, she died quietly in her sleep, from cardiac failure after many years of chronic nephritis. She died at her home, Bentinck Villa, High Ackworth, Hemsworth E., Hemsworth, Yorkshire. In death she looked beautiful and peaceful, and indeed Mary Pollard felt if anything she looked more so three days later, before the funeral. She was buried at 2.30pm on Tuesday the 7th April, in the Friends' burial ground at Ackworth—next to her son Albert. "Fred. Andrews spoke beautifully about how good it was for her to have died so peacefully in the midst of a life still active, with a keen, alert mind—how that very day she was to have read at a B.W.T.A. meeting, etc." Mary recorded how she had learned "dearly to love & much to admire" her mother-in-law, who was greatly missed.15

Her obituary in the Annual Report of the Ackworth Old Scholars' Association says:16

 

LUCY POLLARD, nιe Binns (scholar 1839–45), daughter of George and Margaret Binns, of Sunderland, was born on the 14th of August, 1830. The youngest of fifteen, her early life was spent in the homes of the older members of the family. About the year 1846, she was sent to Worcester to a private school, kept by two Friends named Westcombe. From there she went to Croydon School as apprentice in the days of John Sharp. At this period William Pollard was one of the junior masters, and when, in the course of time, the latter obtained a post as master at Ackworth School their marriage took place soon after.

Owing to broken health twelve years later William Pollard had to give up teaching, and he settled for a time in Reigate, Surrey, but eventually came north to the neighbourhood of Manchester, where, at Sale and Eccles, they lived till William Pollard's death in 1893. The last few years of Lucy Pollard's widowhood were spent in the quiet of an Ackworth home, in close and loving touch with her many children.

Here she retained much interest in the numerous social and educational gatherings at the School, when her health permitted, up to the last. Her life was varied by visits to the homes of her married children. Active in mind, and full of kindly sympathy for many branches of Christian work up to the end, she passed quietly away in her sleep on the 4th of April, 1908, aged seventy-seven years.

Under her will—proved at Wakefield on the 7th May 1908 by her son-in-law John Thomas Irwin—she left £774.5s.8d. (£44,446 at 2005 values).17

Lucy Binns was the youngest child of [K2] George and [L1] Margaret Binns.18

 


1 TNA: RG 6/404, /1149; TNA: HO 107/1309/1 f56 p10; Reminiscences of Frederick Binns (photocopy possessed by Margaret Viney) suggests she may have been born in a house at the corner of Durham Street and Coronation Street, Bishopwearmouth.

2 Ackworth School Centenary Committee (1879) List of the Boys and Girls admitted into Ackworth School 1779–1879, Ackworth; HO 107/1309/1 f56 p10

3 entry in digests of Society of Friends; HO 107/1601 f393 p16; Dictionary of Quaker Biography (Friends' House Library, typescript); William Pollard: 'Some Descendants of James and Mary Pollard', Ms book in my possession; letters of Mary Pollard; Ms notes on family of William & Lucy Pollard, by a son (probably Wilfrid) of Sophie & Joseph Sparkes; photocopy in my possession; genealogical notes by Sidney Beck; Essex Record Office D/Q 49/I2/a1; The Friend 1862-12-01 p. 309; diary letter from H.B. Smith, quoted by Bedford Pollard in The Friend 90:176–7 1932-02-26; Bedford Pollard (1937) Quaker Reminiscences. Ups and downs from Infancy to Longevity, London: Headley Brothers

4 RG 9/3440 f25 p17; RG 10/830 f83 p19; ad in The British Friend, p. 154; The Friend NS XI.July.184

5 Pollard (1937): 5

6 RG 11/3506 f107 p9; RG 12/3153 f43 p31; David Blamires (October 1984) 'William Pollard 1828–1893', Friends' Quarterly; The British Friend XXXVI.Oct:270 & ads p. 3; The Friend XXVII June:176

7 Manchester Evening News, 1894-01-13

8 Wooldale membership register

9 letters from Lucy Pollard to Mary Spence Watson (Pollard)

10 letters from Lucy Pollard to Mary Spence Watson (Pollard); Kelly's Directory; RG 13/4306 f12 p15; Proceedings of the Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, Part XX, Eighth Month, 1901

11 letters from Frank Pollard; book of newspaper cuttings compiled by Robert Spence Watson, now in Newcastle Central Library; Mary S.W. Pollard, list of wedding presents

12 letters of Mary Pollard

13 diaries of Mary S.W. Pollard (Ms)

14 will; diaries of Mary S.W. Pollard; Frank and Mary Pollard visitors' book

15 death certificate; index to wills and administrations, Principal Registry of the Family Division; diaries of Mary S.W. Pollard; B.W.T.A. stands for British Women's Temperance Association; The Friend XLVIII:240, 1908-04-10; The British Friend XVII Apr:112.

16 AOSA Annual Report 27, 1908

17 National Probate Calendar

18 Ackworth School Book 1905; Dictionary of Quaker Biography


K2. GEORGE BINNS

George Binns was born on the 8th March 1781 in Crawshawbooth, Whalley, in the Forest of Rossendale, Lancashire. His upbringing was strict. From 1792 to 1794 he was at Ackworth school, though still normally resident in Crawshawbooth. In September 1800, having recently removed to within the compass of Newcastle Monthly Meeting, Marsden Monthly Meeting, held at Crawshawbooth, sent a certificate testifying that he was of sober conduct and had left them clear of debts and marriage engagements, and recommending him to their Christian care and oversight. The certificate was accepted at the Newcastle Monthly Meeting in November, and Joseph Procter was appointed to visit him.1

signature of George BinnsHe married [L1] Margaret Watson on the 30th January 1805, at Staindrop, his residence at that date being Sunderland in Durham. Their children were: Eliza (1805–1861), Ann (1808–1876), Henry (1810–1880), Thomas Watson (1811–1812), Rachel (1814–1832), George (1815–1847), John (1817–1875), William (1819–1866), Watson (1820–1905), Margaret (1822–1851), Frederick (1825–1911), Sarah (1826–1894), Edward (1827–1902), Sophia (1828–1855), and [K1] Lucy (1830–1908); all were born at Sunderland.2

He was one of two representatives from Sunderland at Newcastle Monthly Meeting in January and November 1806, in June and October 1809, in February, August and December 1810, in April 1811, in March, June and August 1814, and in September 1817. In July 1815, with Robert Foster and four others, he was appointed to a Monthly Meeting committee to attend to the (Friends' ) Schools.3

From 1807 onwards he is recorded as a draper. As a draper of Sunderland he witnessed the marriage of his sister-in-law Rachel Watson to William Rowntree, in 1809. The family lived at Staindrop till around 1818, then moved to Sunderland.4

In 1811 he purchased the woollen drapery and linen shop of Thomas Ellerbury, at 176 High Street, Bishopwearmouth, which employed a journeyman and three apprentices. There he earned a reputation for quality merchandise and integrity in every transaction. In November 1814 he engaged his nephew David Binns as an apprentice; the latter's diaries and memoirs give a few glimpses of his employer. At some period prior to November 1817 he acted as clerk and cashier to Sunderland preparative meeting. Around the end of November 1817 he spent a fortnight in Manchester, on business; he spent about six weeks there in March and April of 1818, and a similar period in London in May and June. At least in the period 1818–1823 he was a diligent attender at local monthly meetings, as well as Darlington Quarterly meeting. He was one of two Sunderland representatives to Monthly Meeting in June and November 1818, in January 1820, in November 1821, in February and December 1822, and in February and June 1823.5

He was a strict Quaker, and is believed to have been fond of corporal punishment. His son Frederick remembered being shut up in a very large drawer at the back of the shop, used for keeping carpets in, by way of punishment (for an unknown offence); by Frederick, at least, he was not much loved. His nephew David also speaks of him as a hard taskmaster, and a less than generous employer (in the hard times of 1817 he gave his staff only bread and milk; he sometimes kept them at work till midnight, during the summer, and only permitted David to visit his parents every two years). He "had a good sized garden, which he took great delight in, and produced many vegatables for the family." in March and April 1818 he spent six weeks in Manchester, and in May and June a similar period in London. In this year he put David in charge of three junior staff. In 1819 he was a subscriber to George Garbutt's History of Sunderland. The 1820 poll book records him as of Easington ward, Sunderland. That summer he and Margaret spent three weeks on a visit to Lancashire. In November 1822 he appointed David manager of his Staindrop branch, but there was bad feeling at David's departure, the latter thinking his uncle had "behaved very shabbily" in failing to pay him for all the expenses he had incurred in travelling on his employer's behalf; as journeyman he had received £35 in his first year, and £40 in his second.6

In November 1823:

 

Uncle George Binns had a narrow escape along with M. Brady and two of his daughters last month, in coming down Keverstone Bank, the shaft broke and they were all tumbled out and the gig mashed in a most strange manner. Uncle was the only one any worse, he having his shoulder bruised, which continued for a length of time before it recovered, so that he could use it properly.7

He was one of two Sunderland representatives to Newcastle Monthly Meeting in August 1817, in July 1828, in February and July 1830, in January and September 1831, and in March 1832. In February 1826 he was one of two trustees appointed by Ann Wood of Staindrop (his wife's first cousin once removed), and was similarly co-executor of her will. In 1827 and 1834 he is described as a linen and woollen draper, of 176 High Street, Sunderland; the house was nearly opposite the Golden Lion. George Binns's drapery shop subsequently developed into Binns & Co. department stores, now part of the House of Fraser.8

He made his will on 18 March 1834:9

 

This is the last Will and Testament of me George Binns of Sunderland near the Sea in the county of Durham Draper made this eighteenth day of the third Month (called March) one thousand eight hundred and thirty four, that is to say, I give devise and bequeath unto and to the use of my dear wife Margaret Binns my son Henry Binns my friend Francis Grey of Bishop Wearmouth in the county of Durham Miller and Shipowner and my son in Law John Bowron Junior their heirs Executors administrators and assigns all and every my real and personal Estate and effects upon the trusts nevertheless hereinafter mentioned and declared concerning the same, that is to day, Upon trust by and out of the rents issues and profits arising out of and from all my said estate and effects to pay an annuity or yearly sum of equal to and for the maintenance and support of my said wife and my children who shall be living born or unborn at the time of my decease and so long as my wife shall continue my widow, that the said trustees shall give unto my children an education suitable to the amount of income arising from my Estate and Effects (that is to say) it is my desire that my children have a guarded and as liberal an education as my circumstances will admit of and that this trust be exercised impartially towards each. That if my wife shall marry again then and in that case her trusteeship shall thereupon cease and I appoint the said Henry Binns, Francis Gray, and John Bowron exclusively to be trustees of my real and personal Estate and effects to and for the use of and benefit of my children Eliza, Ann, Henry, George, John, William, Watson, Margaret, Frederick[,] Sarah, Edward[,] Sophia, and Lucy, and any other or others my child or children who may be living at or may be born after my decease and so long as my wife shall remain my widow my mind and will is that a competent part of the rents issues and profits of my estate and effects be applied to and for the use of my said wife and children during her natural life and till my youngest child for the time being shall attain the age of twenty one years and from and after her decease or second marriage whichever shall first happen and on my youngest child for the time being attaining the age of twenty one years my estate and effects to go to and be equally divided amongst my children who shall survive all these events share and share alike as tenants in common and their respective heirs Executors administrators and assigns Provided nevertheless in case any of my children shall not survive all these events but shall leaving issue surviving, then my will and mind is that the share or shares of my child or children so dying and leaving issue in my Estate and Effects shall go to his her or their respective issue in equal shares as tenants in common and their respective heirs Executors administrators and assigns But in case my wife shall die or marry again my youngest child for the time being shall attain the age of twenty one years my will and mind is that my said other trustees shall continue their Trusteeship to that period, that is to say, until my youngest child for the time being be twenty one years of age And my will and mind is that my said trustees or the survivors or survivor of them or their heirs Executors administrators or assigns of such survivor shall and may either sell or retain my Dwellinghouse and shop situate in the High Street of Sunderland aforesaid and call other my estate and effects as shall appear to them him or her most for the interest and benefit of my said wife and children and may continue or discontinue the trade in the said shop as to at their his and or her discretion but and if my said trustees or trustee shall think it advisable that the business be carried on and continued with suitable arrangements and assistance I should wish it to be done And in case of the sale of my said house and shop and my other Estate and Effects I hereby declare that the receipt in writing of my trustees or the survivors or survivor of them or the heirs Executors administrators or assigns of such survivor shall be an effectual discharge to the purchase or purchasers thereof for so much of the purchase money as shall therein be acknowledged or expressed to be received and that such purchaser or purchasers shall not afterwards be answerable or accountable for the appreciation of such purchase money or any part thereof or for the loss misapplication or non application thereof or be bound to inquire into the necessity or reasonableness of such sale I hereby constitute and appoint my said dear wife my son Henry Binns my friend Francis Gray and my son in law John Bowron Executrix and Executors of this my last Will and Testament and my will and mind is and I do hereby desire it to be considered that my said trustees and executors shall only be answerable each one for the acts of himself and herself and non one for the acts of the other of them and that they respectively shall not be accountable for any loss or miscarriage that m[a]y happen touching my estate and effects and the trusts hereby created by the failure of any security or securities or otherwise nevertheless trusting they will exercise all needful and necessary care and that they respectively shall be paid or may retain out of the trust Estate all such costs charges Damages and expences as shall be occasioned to them in the execution of the trusts hereby reposed in them In Witness where I the said George Binns the testator have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year in the beginning written

George Binns (SS)

[Witnesses: Robt Smart, Bishopwearmouth, Solicitor, Geo Wilson Bishopwearmouth Confectioner, Wm Hayton Clerk to Mr Smart]

He died on the 19th February 1836, apparently of tuberculosis of the lung; an autopsy was performed on his body, the report of which survives.

 

Appearances observed on dissecting the body of the late Mr. Geo: Binns.

In the thorax, the pleura was found so strongly adherent to the right lung, that it was impossible to separate them without tearing. This lung was rendered completely solid by tubercular deposition. Many of the tubercles were (as it turned) [wide?]; but several, especially in the upper part, were softened and filled with ordinary cheese-like matter. The left lung, though looking gorged and vascular, was crepitating throughout much the greater part of its extend; there was, however, one large tubercular mass towards its upper, and back part.

The lining of the trachea was healthy, but that of the bronchi, as far as it could be traced, was vascular.

In the abdomen, the lining of the stomach was considerably inflamed towards its left (cardiac) extremity. The liver was healthy in structure, but the bile contained in the gall-bladder, was thinner and paler than is usually observed. One portion of small intestine was found strongly adhering to the caecum and the vermiform appendix was lost in the adhesion,—the whole showing that inflammation had existed there. The right kidney was softened, and vascular [ends here]

He was buried on the 23rd at Nile Street, Bishopwearmouth.10

His will was proved at Durham on the 15th November 1836; his estate was sworn under £5000 (£220,500 at 2005 values).11

George Binns was the seventh child, and fourth son, of [K3] David and [K24] Ann Binns.12


1 TNA: RG 6/810, Dictionary of Quaker Biography (Friends' House Library, typescript); Ackworth School Centenary Committee (1879) List of the Boys and Girls admitted into Ackworth School 1779–1879, Ackworth; letter & enclosures from Alison Turton, House of Fraser archivist, to author, 9 Jan 1985; David Binns, Ms autobiography (photocopy of transcript in my possession); 1837 Annual Monitor; Testimonies & Certificates 1788–1811 p. 81, TWAS MF 188; minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting, TWAS MF 168

2 Dictionary of Quaker Biography; RG 6/527, /628, /775, 1149; daughter's marriage certificate; Watson Binns obit. in Ackworth School Book 1905

3 Minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting, TWAS MF 167 & /168

4 DQB; RG 6/527, /628, /775, 1149; daughter's marriage certificate

5 letter & enclosures from Alison Turton; William Parsons & William White: Durham Directory, 1827; David Binns, Ms autobiography; David Binns, Ms diary (photocopy of transcript in my possession); TS Journal of William Robson 1817–18 p. 116 (Friends' House Library); Oxford Dictionary of National Biography; minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting, TWAS MF 169

6 Reminiscences of Frederick Binns; photocopy possessed by Margaret Viney; David Binns, Ms autobiography; David Binns, Ms diary; pollbook, cited in David Binns gedcom; www.royalarch97.org, accessed 2008-10-02

7 David Binns, Ms diary

8 letter & enclosures from Alison Turton; Parsons & White (1827), op. cit.; Pigot's Directory for Sunderland, cited in David Binns gedcom; minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting, TWAS MF 169; Reminiscences of Frederick Binns; Durham wills, DPRI/1/1826/W23

9 Durham Diocese registered wills, DPRI 2/46 pp895-897

10 TNA: IR 26/1440 & IR 27/1440; DQB; letter & enclosures from Alison Turton; genealogical notes by Sidney Beck; RG 6/228); 1837 Annual Monitor; Durham Probate Records, DPRI/1/1836/B19 and p882-884

11 IR 26/1440 & IR 27/1440; Durham Diocese registered wills, DPRI 2/46 pp895-897

12 DQB


K3. DAVID BINNS

David Binns was born at Cononley Woodside, in Kildwick, Yorkshire, on the 23rd January 1740/1.1

He moved to Crawshawbooth, in Rossendale, Lancashire, in 1765, and married [K24] Ann Robinson there, on the 26th May 1768. At that date he was a clogger. The couple's twelve children, all born at Crawshawbooth, were: Joseph (1769–1849), John (1771–1821), Margaret (1773–1877), Isabel (1775–1876), Richard (1777–1841), Margaret (1779–1815), [K2] George (1781–1836), Daniel (1783–1842), Elizabeth (1786–1840), Isabel (1788–1851), Ellen (1790–1870), and Sarah (1793–1894).2

signature of David Binns

His signature appears on some of his meeting's grave notes (instructions to gravediggers to dig graves) in 1786, 1787, and 1792. He was one of the signatories to the Marsden MM testimony to the life of Tabitha Marriott, in April 1787.3

He lived in Crawshawbooth at least until 1805, and remained a clogmaker (although in 1806 he was described as a leather cutter) to his death, on the 17th February 1809. He was buried at Crawshawbooth on the 19th. His will, in which he's described as a clogger and leather cutter, is in the probate register for Cheshire, bearing date 26 June 1809.4

David Binns was the second child and second son of [K4] Joseph and [K21] Isabel Binns.5

 


1 TNA: RG 6/1091, /1279, /1616A

2 RG 6/806, /810, /1616A; Dictionary of Quaker Biography

3 RG 6/807, /969, /1168B; Joseph Wood notebooks

4 RG 6/203, /1616A; DQB; RG 6/710; extracted probate records; John Binns and Abigail Binns Family

5 RG 6/1005


K4. JOSEPH BINNS

Joseph Binns was born on the 19th May 1711 at Farnhill, Craggtop, near Kildwick, Yorkshire.1

A slater, of Coninley Woodside, Kildwick, he married [K21] Isabel Burton on the 1st March 1737/8, at Leeyeat, Dent, Yorkshire. At this date, and in 1740/1, he lived at Cononley Woodside. Their children were: John (1739–1812), [K3] David (1740/1–1809), Daniel (1744–1830), and Margaret (1747–1818); all born at Cononley Woodside.2

He was always religiously inclined, although his life was attended by many trials and temptations. He received a gift in the ministry in about the year 1760 and visited Scotland and several counties in England. He bore a public testimony for 16 years, and between 1757 and 1770, with his wife, visited Westmorland, Lancashire, several parts of Yorkshire, and also Ireland. He was a very plain man, who had much sympathy with the afflicted and was notable for his charity to the poor.3

In 1762 he was a tenant of Samuel and then Roger Swire.4

In 1769 he was left his father-in-law's "best Close" (coat &c.), under the terms of his will; at this date he was still resident at Cononley Woodside.5

His death, on the 27th August 1776, was very sudden: he fell down in the shearing field when making a band, and died in a few minutes. He was buried at Skipton on the 30th. In 1801 he was said to have been a farmer, at Cononley-woodside, Kildwick.6

Joseph Binns was the sixth child, and fifth son, of [K5] John and [K16] Abigail Binns.7

 


1 TNA: RG 6/1091, /1279

2 RG 6/1235, /1279, /1616A; Dictionary of Quaker Biography; information from Alf Rogers; Brian Davey: Thistlethwaite CD

3 Dictionary of Quaker Biography; information from Alf Rogers

4 Trevor Hodgson and David Gulliver (2000) The History of Cononley: an Airedale Village

5 email from Margaret Page, citing the will, taken from the Lonsdale Deanery Probate Files, A-G surnames, 1761-1170, FHL film \99045; RG 6/1616A.

6 'An account of the family of the Binns's from the Year 1663', aka 'Binns notebook', MS vol. S 494, LSF; RG 6/785; information from Alf Rogers

7 DQB


K5. JOHN BINNS

John Binns was born on the 29th September 1663, at Cloughheigh, Keighley, Yorkshire. He was baptised at Keighley on 4 October that year. In 1674 he was the recipient of a legacy of five shillings, under his grandfather's will.1

He first began to attend meetings of the Society of Friends in 1683.2

On 5 February 1690/1 he was witness to the wedding of William Davy and Hannah Roberts, at Keighley.3

On the 10th June 1703 he married [K16] Abigail King, at Long Croft, Cowlinghead. They started married life in a poor way, living at Cragtop near Kildwick. About 1712 they moved to Carlton Biggin, Yorkshire. Their children were: John (1703/4–1785), Benjamin (1705–1785), William (1707–1792), Jonas (1708–1784), Martha (1710–1788), [K4] Joseph (1711–1776), Henry (1712–1781), Abraham (1714–1714), Abraham (1716/7–1781), Jonathan (1718–1794), Mary (1720–1720), David (1721–1801), and Mary (1724–1725); all births were registered by Yorkshire Quarterly Meeting.4

On 24 October 1705 he was appointed as representative to Monthly Meeting. On 30 April 1707 his house at Farnhill Crag Top, Kildwick, was used as the venue for the Quaker wedding of Henry King and Luce Smith. On 30 August 1710 he was one of four individuals appointed as a trustee of the meeting house; and on 26 1st month 1711/12 (?) he was again nominated to be a trustee, but was intending to remove within Skipton Meeting; he gave 1s. towards a collection raised for repairing the meeting-house yard. In 1716 his home at Carlton Biggin was recorded as a place of religion for the service of the people called Quakers.5

He was a minister of the Society of Friends, described as a plain man who worked industriously to support his family, whom he treated with a measure of discipline. He lived an exemplary life and was respected by his neighbours. "It was neither Hay time nor Harvest that could keep him from week day meeting, tho he had but little in the world and a great charge of Children."6

Still of Carlton Biggin, John Binns died on the 25th June 1731. He was buried at Skipton. Administration of his estate was granted to his wife on 6 July that year.7

John Binns was the elder known child of K6 John and [K7] ____ Bynnes.8


1 Binns pedigrees, Sunderland public library; Extracts from a Manuscript Book, written by Jonathan Binns, (1785–1871), of Lancaster; 'An account of the family of the Binns's from the Year 1663', aka 'Binns notebook', MS vol. S 494, LSF; Dictionary of Quaker Biography (Friends' House Library, typescript); parish register; pdf of grandfather's will

2 Dictionary of Quaker Biography

3 TNA: RG 6/1091

4 letters to me from Maggie Hartley; RG 6/1091, /1279; information from Alf Rogers; David Binns gedcom

5 information from Jon Wicken, citing Keighley Quaker register and 'The Quaker Register, Calversike (?) Hill'; W. Pearson Thistlethwaite: Yorkshire Quarterly Meeting, (1665–1966). 1979; DQB

6 DQB; Thistlethwaite (1979), op. cit.; the latter gives name as 'Bins'.

7 RG 6/1279; pdf of admon, from Jon Wicken

8 parish register

 


K6. JOHN BYNNES

John Bynnes was baptised at Keighley, Yorkshire, on 22 October 1637.1

He married [K14] Sara Firth at St Thomas's, Heptonstall, Yorkshire, on 19 May 1662, and their children were: [K5] John (1663–1731), an unnamed child (? – 1666), and three abortive children (all 1674). In 1663 and 1666 John Bynns was said to be of Hey.2

In 1674 he inherited one seventh of his father's residual estate. His body was buried at Keighley on 21 July 1678.3

John Bynns was the second child and eldest son of [K7] William and [K9] Elling Bynnes.4

 

 

1 Keighley parish register

2 Keighley parish register; Heptonstall parish register

3 pdf of father's will; Keighley parish register

4 Keighley parish register

 


K7. WILLIAM BYNNES

William Bynnes was baptised at Keighley on 24 April 1602.1

He married [K9] Elling Tatam on 25 November 1635, at Keighley. Their children were: Susan (1635 – after 1672), [K6] John (1637–1678), Nathan (1639 – after 1672), Benjamin (1641–1644), William (c. 1642/3 – after 1672), Abraham (c. 1644/5 – after 1672), Elizabeth (1646 – before 1672), Robert (1647–1678), and Jonas (1652 – after 1672), all but William and Abraham baptised at Keighley.2

He made his will on 29 January 1672:3

 

In the name of God Amen: the nine and Twentyth day of January in the year of Our Lord God according to our English computac~on one Thousand Six hundred Sevventie and Two I William Bynnes of the Hey wthin the parish of Kighley and Diocesse of yorke being Sicke in bodie but of Sound minde and perfect memorie praised be almightye God for the Same and knowing and considering the frailty and uncertainety of this mortall life and the Certainety of death doe therefore make ordaine and appoint this my last will and Testament in manner and forme following that is to Say first and principally I commend my Soule into the hands of almightye God my maker hoping to have my Sinnes all pardoned and freely remitted for the merritts and precious bloud Shedd Sake of Jesus Christ my only Savior and redeemer and my bodie to Christian buriall in A Decent manner according to my degree and quallity and as Touching the giveing and disposeing of my whole wordley estate reale & personall my true will & minde is as followeth, first I will that all my true Debts which I owe my funerall expences the probac~on of this my will and Testament and all other things and charges incident and belonging to the Settleing and performance of the Same Shall bee first paid and discharged out and forth of my Said whole estate. next I doe will and grand that Hellen now my wife Shall have her full right in the Law of in and throughout my Said estate according to the laudable Custome of this province of yorke And I doe hereby give and bequeath unto her and her assignes the one halfe of what benefit may bee adjudged in the Tenement and farme whereon I now dwell. And I alsoe give and bequeath unto Abraham my Sonne and his assignes the other halfe the benefitt of the Same. And it is my minde and desire that my Said wife and my Said Sonne Abraham Should live peacably together & alsoe permit and Suffer my Sonne Nathon to joyne wth them in a part of the Same Tenement he paying his rateable proporc~on of rent and dutyes for the Same And if my Said wife doe not agree and like to live wth my Sonne Abraham I will and desire her to assigne her Said right and Tythe therein unto my Said Sonne Nathan Binnes; I give and bequeath by Legacye unto John Sonne of John Binnes my Grandchild five shillings of Currant English money I give and bequeath by Legacye unto John Sonne of Richard Sharpp and Susan his wife five Shillings of like money Item I give and bequeath by Legacye unto Susannah Daughter of William Binnes my Grandchild five Shillings of like money to be paid to them upon their respective ffathers acquittance Item I give and bequeath unto the Said Abraham my Sonne and his assignes my Bay Mare and a peat Cart & Dungcart and a paire of Cart wheeles and all the furniture belonging to the Said Mare And alsoe I give and bequeath to the Said Abraham and his assignes one Cow called Taggell and five Ewe Sheep nowe in Lancashire and I give unto Robert my Sonne one paire of loomes And as Touching the residue and remainder of my Said whole estate Goods Chattells Cattells and Creditts I doe hereby will and devise give and bequeath the Same to bee equally parted and devided amongst my Seaven Childeren in Seaven equall partes to wit unto Richard Sharp & Susan now his wife my daughter one Seaventh part and their assignes Item unto John Binnes my Sonne and his assignes one Seaventh part Item unto Nathan Binnes and his assignes the Seaventh part Item unto William Binnes my Sonne and his assignes one Seaventh part Item unto Abraham my Sonne and his assignes one Seaventh part Item unto Robert Binnes my Sonne And his assignes one Seaventh part. And alsoe unto Jonas Binnes my Sonne And his assignes one Seaventh part. And I will that the Said Goods Chattells Cattells and Creditts Shall bee decided wthin one Month next after my death at the discrec~on and Judgment of Robert Hall thelder of Newsome and John Wright of Sleetherieford my friends and Neighboures whome I doe hereby make and appoint Supervisors of this my last will and Testament upon which theire division I desire and will that my Said Children Shall respectively cast lotts for theire parts thereof And lastly I doe hereby ordaine make and appoint the Said Hellen my wife Sole executrix of this my last will and Testament in wittnesse whereof I the Said William Binnes the Testator have hereunto put my hand and Seale the day and year first above written the Testator his marke and Seale—these being wittnesse hereof George Holdworth marke Benjamin Tatum his marke Michall Tatam his marke William Ighorngill.|~~~

His body was buried at Keighley on 5 February 1672. His will was proved in August 1674.4

William Bynnes was the only known son of [K8] William Bynnes.5

 

1 parish register transcript

2 parish register; information from Jon Wicken

3 pdf of will, from Jon Wicken

4 parish register; pdf of will, and information from Jon Wicken

5 parish register transcript

 


K8. WILLIAM BYNNES

The only child of William Bynnes known to me was [K7] William Bynnes.1

 

1 parish register transcript; FamilySearch has the marriage of a Willm Binnes and Margret Shacleden in Keighley in 1574, but this is surely too early to have been that of the present subject. Possibly this was his father's marriage (the father of [K8] William, to be clear).

 


K9. ELLIN BYNNES born TATAM

Ellin Tatam was baptised at Keighley on 10 November 1605.1

Elling Tatam married [K7] William Bynns on 25 November 1635, at Keighley. Their children were: Susan (1635 – after 1672), [K6] John (1637–1678), Nathan (1639 – after 1672), Benjamin (1641–1644), William (c. 1642/3 – after 1672), Abraham (c. 1644/5 – after 1672), Elizabeth (1646 – before 1672), Robert (1647–1678), and Jonas (1652 – after 1672), all but William and Abraham baptised at Keighley.2

In 1674 she was sole executrix of her late husband's will, under which she inherited half his tenement and farm. The body of Ellen Bynns, widow, was buried at Keighley on 25 Apr 1676.3

Ellin Tatam was the third and youngest known child of [K10] Benjamin and [K11] Elizabeth Tatam.4

 

1 parish register

2 parish register; information from Jon Wicken

3 pdf of husband's will; Yorkshire, Extracted Parish Records

4 parish register

 


K10. BENJAMIN TATAM

Benjamin Tatam married [K11] Elizabeth Blakey on 19 July 1590, at Keighley; their children were:  Ann (1592/3 – ?), Robert (1594 – ?), Isabel (1597 – ?), Elizabeth (1599 – ?), and [K9] Ellen (1605 – ?), all baptised at Keighley.1

 

1 parish register

 


K11. ELIZABETH TATAM born BLAKEY

Elizabeth Blakey was baptised at Keighley, Yorkshire, on 15 July 1565.1

She married [K10] Benjamin Tatam on 19 July 1590, at Keighley; their children were:  Ann (1592/3 – ?), Robert (1594 – ?), Isabel (1597 – ?), Elizabeth (1599 – ?), and [K9] Ellen (1605 – ?), all baptised at Keighley.2

It was probably this Elizabeth, wife of Benjamin Tatham, who was buried at Keighley on 27 November 1643.3

Elizabeth Blakey was the daughter of [K12] John and [K13] ____ Blakey.4

 

1 parish register

2 parish register

3-4 information from Jon Wicken, citing Keighley parish registers

 


K12. JOHN BLAKEY

John Blakey married [K13] ____ ____. Their children were: Isabell (1564/5–1575/6), [K11] Elizabeth (1565 – ?), Jenet (1569/70–1697), John (1571/2 – ?), Robert (1575–1577), and Margret (1583 – ?).1

It was probably his body that was buried at Keighley on 8 January 1582/3.2

 

1–2 information from Jon Wicken, citing Keighley parish registers

 


K13. ____ BLAKEY born ____

____ ____ married [K12] John Blakey. Their children were: Isabell (1564/5–1575/6), [K11] Elizabeth (1565 – ?), Jenet (1569/70–1697), John (1571/2 – ?), Robert (1575–1577), and Margret (1583 – ?).1

 

1 Keighley parish register

 


K14. SARA BYNNES born FIRTH

Sara Firth was baptised at Keighley, Yorkshire, on 14 Jun 1640.1

She married [K6] John Bynnes at St Thomas's, Heptonstall, Yorkshire, on 19 May 1662, and their children were: [K5] John (1663–1731), an unnamed child (? – 1666), and three abortive children (all 1674).2

Sara Firth was the daughter of [K15] Abraham Firth.3

 

1 parish register

2 Keighley parish register; Heptonstall parish register

3 parish register

 


K15. ABRAHAM FIRTH

There are a number of individuals of this name who could have been Sara's father. At this stage the only thing that can be said for certain is that an Abraham Firth was father to [K14] Sarah.1

 

1 Keighley parish register

 


K16. ABIGAIL BINNS born KING

Abigail King was born on the 29th May 1682 at Mirehouse near Marton, Yorkshire.1

She married [K5] John Binns on the 10th June 1703, at Long Croft, Cowlinghead. They lived first at Cragtop near Kildwick, then about 1712 moved to Carlton Biggin. Their children were: John (1703/4–1785), Benjamin (1705–1785), William (1707–1792), Jonas (1708–1784), Martha (1710–1788), [K4] Joseph (1711–1776), Henry (1712–1781), Abraham (1714–1714), Abraham (1716/7–1781), Jonathan (1718–1794), Mary (1720–1720), David (1721–1801), Mary (1724–1725); all births were registered by Yorkshire Quarterly Meeting.2

signature of Abigail (King) BinnsIn May 1745 "Abigale Binns" wrote to one Henry Simpson (possibly her landlord's farm steward), requesting that he petition her landlord, the earl of Burlington, for a yearly stipend for her.

 

I being an Old Widow and have had thirteen Childer; and above 70 Years of Age; and hath been tenant to his Lordship above 30 Years at Carleton Biggen have Endeavoured to pay his Lordships Rent Honestly, In hopes my Sons will do the Same; And having had the Misfortune to Loose Some moneys that my Husband left me, by people breaking and Running away; Which has Reduced me so that I have nothing left, but what my Childer pleased to give me; which is very hard when Old age and poverty meets together: Sr If one might be so bold without offence to crave on his Lordship to bestow some Small matter yearly on a poor Widow for my time here cannot be longe; Would be very acceptable and would Ever pray for his Lordship and all that Honoble Famely: If your Worship thinks propper to move it to his Lordship, shall ever be highly obliged to you for that great favour.

Simpson obliged, adding that Abigale lived "In good Repute", had "Endeavoured to bringe up her sd Children with School Learning and Traids", but was now "very Infirm". Both letter and petition survive, though there is no record of the outcome.3

She was a tender, well inclined woman, a dutiful wife and an affectionate mother, very cheerful and free with her friends. She had great sympathy with all kinds of affliction. She was very industrious and was noted for her housekeeping. She made the poor as welcome to her table as the rich and even helped beggars on their way.4

She died on 31 March 1753, and was buried in Skipton Friends' burying-ground on 3 April.5

Abigail King was the daughter of [K17] William and [K20] Mary King.6

 


1 Binns Notebook, Friends House Library, MS vol S 494 p4

2 Binns Notebook, Friends House Library; TNA: RG 6/1091, /1279

3 letter & petition from Abigail Binns, in Chatsworth House archives; my own speculation on who Simpson was

4 Dictionary of Quaker Biography; letters to author from Nancy Mosier, incl. transcribed Binns narrative

5 RG 6/1091, /1279

6 DQB; information from Virginia Smith, forwarded by Margaret Page 2006-07-01


K17. WILLIAM KING

William King was probably born in 1650 and baptised at Skipton on 2 June that year. He married [K20] Mary Parker in October 1681, at Salterforth meeting. Their children were [K16] Abigail, and probably William and Henry.1

In January 1685/6 the autobiography of William Stout of Lancaster records the following:2

 

But upon the first day of the week, in the evning, in the eleventh month 1685, a meeting was held at my master's house, in which one William King, a plaine country farmer of Craven in Yorkshire, preached where I then attended. And the same was so much in the demonstration of the power and holy spirit of God to exhort all to an obediance, to the light reveled in the heart and soule of our duty to God, that it iresistably constrained me to owne his testamony and submit to my conviction and obediance to the inward teaching of the spirit and power of God in Christ Jesus, which, if obeyed, would lead me into all truth. And the said conviction was then so powerfull that I resolved, through the divine assistance of the said power, to make a public profession of the principles of the people caled Quakers [ . . . ]

On 8 October 1689 the house of William King of Stainton was registered as a meeting place under the Toleration Act of that year. William King of Stainton had tithes to the value of £1 5s. taken in kind during the period 1683 to 1690. His house at Stainton was still in use for Quaker meetings on 15 April 1697, as it was used for a Quaker wedding on that date. But by July 1698 he had apparently moved to Oakcliff, as at that date "Wm. King's Oucliffe in Carleton" was registered under the Toleration Act. His house at "Ouckclif" was used for a Quaker wedding on 8 March 1703/4. William King was recorded as a witness at two of his siblings' marriages.3

He died on 17 May 1714, the following obituary being recorded in Piety Promoted:4

 

WILLIAM KING, late of Oakcliff, in Yorkshire, was a man "fearing God, of a peaceable conversation, not only in the church, of which he was a faithful member, but likewise to such as were without; and he obtained a good report amongst both, and hath left a sweet savour behind him.

It pleased the Lord to commit to him a dispensation of the gospel, and therein he approved himself a faithful and true labourer, according to the measure of the gift bestowed, to promote truth and righteousness in his day, and was a good example ; and manifested to all, that it was his chiefest care to live a life answerable to what he made profession of, often advising friends to keep to the root of life, the spring of divine wisdom, from whence all good comes.

He was also a diligent attender of meetings, and advised friends to faithfulness therein. "When his departure was near at hand, he, as he often had, gave good advice and counsel to his children, to keep to the truth, and to set their hearts and doors open to the friends of it ; saying he had as much love to friends and truth as ever. To a friend who came to visit him, he said, ' I am fitted to die.' At another time he said, ' I can with the apostle say, measurably, I have fought the good fight, and kept the faith, and well nigh finished my course, and there is a crown laid up for me.' He often declared his full satisfaction concerning his future well-being; and uttered many more weighty expressions, not noted.

He departed this life the 17th of the Third month, aged sixty-five years.

He was apparently the third child and third son of [K18] Henry and [K19] ____ King.5

 

1 FamilySearch; Piety Promoted; Dictionary of Quaker Biography (Friends' House Library, typescript); information from Virginia Smith, forwarded by Margaret Page 2006-07-01; information from Jon Wicken; index by Arthur Olver of marriage intentions in minute book H1, Settle MM

2 The Autobiography of William Stout of Lancaster

3 BesseGenuki transcript; information from Jon Wicken, citing Settle MM registers; Northowram of Coley register

4 information from Jon Wicken, citing Settle MM registers; Piety Promoted

5 Dictionary of Quaker Biography; information from Jon Wicken

 


K18. HENERY KING

Henery King of Mire House, near Marton, married [K19] (probably Margaret) ____. Their children were John (1647–1738), Henery (1649–1737), [K17] William (1650–1714), Thomas (? – 1734/5), Lawrence (? – 1724), another son, Mary (? – before 1716), Margaret (? – 1732), and two other daughters. From 1647 to 1650 he was described as of Emsy or Emsall (i.e. Embsay, near Skipton).1

In April 1656 he was among the witnesses to the marriage of John Dickinson and Elizabeth Parks.2

Settle Monthly Meeting recorded that the body of Henry King of Mirehouse near Marton was buried on 27 September 1680.3


 

1 FamilySearch; information from Jon Wicken; information from Virginia Smith, forwarded by Margaret Page 2006-07-01, appears now to be incorrect

2 information from Jon Wicken; ditto, attaching scan from Skipton p.r. transcript

3 TNA: RG 6/1116

 


K19. ____ KING born ____

(Probably Margaret) ____ married [K18] Henery King. Their children were John (1647–1738), Henery (1649–1737), [K17] William (1650–1714), Thomas (? – 1734/5), Lawrence (? – 1724), another son, Mary (? – before 1716), Margaret (? – 1732), and two other daughters.1

In 1695 and 1697 Margaret King witnessed the marriages of Henry and John King; her house was listed in 1698 under the requirements of the Toleration Act. She died on 24 October 1700.2


1 FamilySearch; information from Jon Wicken; information from Virginia Smith, forwarded by Margaret Page 2006-07-01, appears now to be incorrect

2 information from Jon Wicken

 


K20. MARY KING born PARKER

Mary Parker married [K17] William King in October 1681, at Salterforth meeting. Their children were [K16] Abigail, and probably William and Henry.1

____ Parker was the daughter of [K21] Benjamin Parker.2


1 information from Virginia Smith, forwarded by Margaret Page 2006-07-01; information from Jon Wicken, citing Settle MM registers and Carlton Hill minutes; index by Arthur Olver of marriage intentions in minute book H1, Settle MM

2 information from Virginia Smith

 


K21. BENJAMIN PARKER

Benjamin Parker resided at Thornton.1

Quite possibly he was the Benjamin Parker of Thornton whose house was registered as a Quaker meeting house in 1689, after the Toleration Act.2

 


1 information from Virginia Smith, forwarded by Margaret Page 2006-07-01

2 oneguyfrombarlick.co.uk/article_read.asp?item=104, accessed 2010-05-13

 


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