Children of John and Sarah Augusta Richardson

01. Charles Richardson

1826-12-27 b. Summerhill Grove, St John, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland TNA: PRO RG 6/404, /775; Annual Monitor; Old York Scholars' Association (1971) Bootham School Register. London: Oyez Press
1836/1842 at Lawrence Street school, York OYSA (1971)
  interested in natural history as a schoolboy, and collected British land shells and butterflies The Advantages of Early Piety
1841 of East Law, Ebchester, living with his family and four female servants PRO HO 107/301/9 f4 p3
1842/1845 worked in grandfather's shop, Plymouth, Devon Annual Monitor
  a pious, intelligent young man. Kept a journal Annual Monitor
1846-03-24 of Newcastle-upon-Tyne; d. Newcastle upon Tyne RD, from pulmonary consumption Annual Monitor; GRO index; The Advantages of Early Piety
 

CHARLES RICHARDSON,       19    3mo. 24 1846

Newcastle. Son of John and Sarah Richardson.

At an early age, this beloved youth appears to have been made sensible of the tender visitations of his Heavenly Father's Love.

When nine years old, he was placed at York School, where he remained more than six years. During much of that time, especially the latter part of it, his conduct and conversation evinced that the fear of the Lord was before him, and that he was careful to attend to the gentle intimations of the Holy Spirit, and was thus enabled to maintain the strife with the evil propensities of our fallen nature, and to resist in great measure, the temptations incident to youth.

Kindness and truthfulness marked his intercourse with others; but his peculiar characteristic was, more than ordinary firmness in doing whatever he believed to be right. In obedience to this principle, on one occasion, whilst at school, when his firmness was put to a severe test, he courageously stood alone, silently and unobtrusively refusing to do as his class mates did, because he believed that so doing, would involve unkindness and injustice.

Twelve months after he had left York School, he paid a short visit there, on passing through the City. In a letter to one of his cousins, who was still at school, he speaks of the enjoyment he had had in the visit, and says that "he had not one uncomfortable feeling in re-entering the establishment," and adds "I feel persuaded, that if I had not endeavoured whilst a scholar, to perform my duty towards my teachers and schoolfellows, and give satisfaction to my master and mistress, my feelings would have been very different: would they not have been those of sorrow and regret?"

When he was sixteen years of age, he was placed in his grandfather's hop, at Plymouth, where he remained two years. He was fond of the study of Natural History, and by his diligence, he attained a considerable degree of proficiency in various branches of scientific knowledge.

Whilst at Plymouth, he commenced a diary; which is thus prefaced:— "I have for some time past, thought it would be very interesting to keep a diary or journal, in which events, which might otherwise escape my memory, might be entered; and to which, at a future period, I might refer with pleasure. It is with this view, and that of rendering me more circumspect in my life and conversation, that I am induced at this time, to begin to keep such an account, trusting that it may be accompanied with the Divine blessing."

The following are a few extracts from it, descriptive of his religious feelings.

5th month 11th, 1843. "Oh! I do indeed, most earnestly hope and crave, that I may be enabled to shun every temptation which may be permitted to cross my path, and walk acceptably in the sight, and in the fear of the Almighty"

21st. "Oh! how I do desire that I may not be found living in a state of lukewarmness or indifference; but that with purpose of heart, I may indeed cleave unto the Lord."

31st, Fourth day. "This morning I attended meeting, i am afraid, to but little profit: nothing was said in the line of the ministry, and I felt more than considerable difficulty in abstracting my mind from earthly and temporal thoughts, and fixing them on things eternal. Oh! how earnestly do I desire, that I may, in future, be strengthened to wait upon the Lord in singleness of heart, in these our religious assemblies, and be given to feel the gracious presence and covering of the Holy Spirit.["]

6th month 17th. "At times, throughout the day, I have felt much discouraged, and have been brought very low through a deep sense of my own sinfulness and weakness. I have been led earnestly to entreat the Almighty on my own behalf, that my sins may be for ever be blotted out, and that I may, in time to come, be preserved from sinning, and be delivered from evil. That I may know my heart to be cleansed—to be washed and made white in the blood of the Lamb. The gracious promise is recorded, 'Though your sins be scarlet, they shall be as white as snow, though they be red like crimson they shall be as wool.'"

25th. "In the evening, I was given to feel the utter weakness and helplessness of my own condition,—to see that I had sinned and fallen short, yes, very far short, of the glory of God; under a sense of which, I desire to feel truly humbled."

7th month, 2nd. "In the morning meeting we were addressed by S. T., and in the evening meeting, after we had sat some time, during which, I had a sense of my own unworthiness given me, and had felt somewhat cast down through a fear that I was lukewarm towards the one great object, we were addressed in a cheering and comforting manner by J. T., who spoke for the encouragement of some present very acceptably; and during the remainder of the sitting I had great peace of mind, for which I feel thankful."

3rd. "In taking a little retrospect of my recent life and conduct, this evening, I have felt sorry to find what slight progress I have made in my journey heavenward. Indeed, in my case, there seems much to mourn over, and Oh! how earnest are my desires that Almighty God would be pleased, in his unmerited mercy and lovingkindness, and for the sake of his dear Son, to pardon all my past sins,—sins of omission and commission more than I can number!—that he would give me strength in future to avoid every temptation, and to resist the great enemy of my soul's salvation."

More extracts might be added from his diary, which he continued to keep until within a month of his death, but the foregoing are sufficient to set forth the tenderness and abasedness of his spirit before his God, and to show that he had not neglected the work of his soul's regeneration.

He returned to Newcastle in the spring of 1845, with a cold which he had greatly increased whilst attending the yearly meeting in London, and which, although it seemed nearly to leave him during the summer, returned in the autumn, and medical endeavours to remove it were unavailing. He was taken, in the 12th month, for change of air, to the neighbourhood of Plymouth, where he remained about two months, his health during the time, gradually declining.

On the 2nd of 2nd month, 1846, he returned home, and the next day made the following entry in his diary. After describing his journey, and expressing his thankfulness for his safe return, he adds, "I am considerably worse and weaker than when I left home, and to me it seems very doubtful which way my complaint will turn. I think I may say—humbly say, in truth, I am fully resigned to die, could I but feel confident that my sins were forgiven. My fervent prayers have many times been put up before the throne of grace, to this effect, that my numerous sins might be washed away in the blood of Jesus; and I have generally found peace of mind for my portion, but I often fear that, throughout all, it may arise from lukewarmness or indifference. Oh, the prayer of my inmost soul is, that this may not be the case! Oh, that the joys of heaven may one day be mine! May the Holy Spirit dwell continually within me, to guide me to its gates of praise—then shall I be permitted to dwell for ever with the Father and with his Son, my Redeemer, who is love inexpressible! Oh, the wonderful greatness of His majesty who formed the universe, as well as the smallest of creatures!—What power!—What knowledge! Oh, to be where He is! and to partake of that bliss which it hath not entered into the heart of man even to conceive!"

Throughout his illness, a sweet peace was mercifully permitted to be the covering of his mind, which made it truly pleasant to his friends to be with him.

The last entry he made in his diary, was on the 28th of 2nd month, and was as follows:— "I have for the last few days, been arranging a few presents to give to my relations and friends, in doing which, I have felt comforted and easy; indeed the peace of my mind has latterly flowed as a river, in the full hope of immortality."

After this time he became too weak to write, but he sweetly expressed to those about him, and to friends who called to see him on various occasions, his hope of a blessed immortality.

On the morning of the 24th of 3rd month, he said that, he felt that his end was come, and that he had a joyful prospect of being soon in that land where he should hunger no more, neither thirst any more, but be led to streams of living water; and about six o'clock in the evening, his bright spirit left its decayed tabernacle to enjoy a better state of existence, for which he was prepared through the tender mercy of the Lord.

 

1847 Annual Monitor
1848 subject of The Advantages of Early Piety, displayed, in A Short Memoir of the late Charles Richardson. Newcastle: Printed for private circulation. (W. Irwin, printer, Manchester) Smith's Supplement to a Descriptive Catalogue of Friends' Books


02. Benjamin Richardson

1828-08-22 b. Summerhill Grove, St John, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland TNA: PRO RG 6/404, /775; PRO RG 6/228
1831-12-04 of Summerhill Grove, Westgate, Northumberland; d. RG 6/228, /1151
1831-12-05 bur. Westgate Hill cemetery, Northumberland RG 6/228, /1151


03. John Richardson

1830-03-18 b. Summerhill Grove, St John, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland TNA: PRO RG 6/404, /1149; PRO RG 6/228
1831-11-26 of Summerhill Grove, Westgate, Northumberland; d. RG 6/228, /1151
1831-11-27 bur. Westgate Hill cemetery, Northumberland RG 6/228, /1151


James Richardson04. James Richardson

1831-09-26 b. Summerhill Grove, St John, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland TNA: PRO RG 6/404, /1149; censuses; Annual Monitor; Old York Scholars' Association (1971) Bootham School Register. London: Oyez Press
1841 of East Law, Ebchester, living with his family and four female servants PRO HO 107/301/9 f4 p3
1843/1845 at Lawrence Street School, York OYSA (1971)
1846/1847 at Bootham School, York OYSA (1971)
1851 leather manufr, of Elswick Lane, Elswick, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland, living with his family and three servants HO 107/2404 f543 p42
by 1854-12-16 had donated £20 to the Newcastle Infirmary Newcastle Journal, 1854-12-16
  member, Infirmary Management Committee Edgar B. Collinson, ed. (1935) Bootham School Register, 2nd edition
1857-06-17 m. Augusta Ann Dixon (1836–1913, of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, d. of Jeremiah and Mary Dixon), at Newcastle-upon-Tyne fmh censuses; Annual Monitor; OYSA (1971); Newcastle Courant, 1857-06-19
Children: Amelia Constance (1859–1949), Augusta Mary (1860–1938), Cornelius (1861–1865), Julia (1863–1868), Laura (1864–1944), Helena (1866–1955), Sara (1867–1963), James Alaric (1869–1958), Frank (1870–1969), Dorothea (1872–1970), John (1874–1892), Nicholas (1876–1957) censuses; Annual Monitor; OYSA (1971); Claire Williams (1982) 'A Chart of the Descendants of John Richardson 1799–1959 Tanner of Newcastle upon Tyne and Sarah Jane Balkwill 1802–1889 of Plymouth' (photocopy of MS wheel chart)
1861 of 3 Summerhill Grove, Westgate, Newcastle-upon-Tyne; with his wife, boarder with Sarah Foster, lodging house keeper, at Cold Bath Rd, Pannal, Yorkshire; also boarding there are his 2nd cousin once removed Henry Richardson and his wife RG 9/3206 f84 p25
by 1862-01-31 with brother Edward, had donated £5 5s. for the relief of the families of the victims of the Hartley Colliery Accident Newcastle Courant, 1862-01-31
1862-08-26 treasurer of the Girls' Jubilee School Newcastle Journal, 1862-08-27
1866-07-23 of 3 Summerhill Grove, Newcastle Mosscroft visitors' book
1870-05-19 of 3 Summerhill Grove, N.C.
1871 leather manufacturer, of 3 Summerhill Grove, Westgate, Newcastle, living with his family and four domestic servants RG 10/5072 f81 p28
1874-01-01 leather dresser, of Elswick Leather Works, Newcastle-on-Tyne; co-executor of the will of his brother Joseph Hancock Richardson National Probate Calendar
1874-11-15 son b. at South Ashfield Newcastle Courant, 1874-11-20
1880-03-27 tanner, of South Ashfield; co-executor of the will of John Edmund Sturge National Probate Calendar
1881 tanner/leather manufacturer empl. 140 men 20 women 20 boys, E. & J. Richardson, Elswick Leather Works, Newcastle-upon-Tyne; of South Ashfield, Elswick, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, living with his family and four domestic servants RG 11/5051 f57 p7
1887-02-01 on the committee of the Lit. & Phil. for the forthcoming year Newcastle Courant, 1887-02-04
  clerk, Durham Quarterly Meeting; Director, F.P.I: hobbies—astronomy, horology Collinson, ed. (1935)
1890-06-16 late of South Ashfield, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, leather manufacturer; d. at Newcastle Annual Monitor; National Probate Calendar; OYSA (1971)
1890-07-21 will proved at Newcastle by Augusta Ann Richardson, brothers David & Henry Richardson, and Thomas Pumphrey, the executors; personal estate £98,794 14s. 11d. in the United Kingdom National Probate Calendar


Emma (Richardson) Pumphrey05. Emma Richardson

1833-09-30 b. Summerhill Grove, St John, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland TNA: PRO RG 6/404, /1149; censuses
1841 of East Law, Ebchester, living with his family and four female servants PRO HO 107/301/9 f4 p3
1846-11/1850-06 of Newcastle; at Mount School, York The Mount School, York. List of Teachers and Scholars 1784-1816, 1831-1906. 1906, York: Sessions
1851 at home, at Elswick Lane, Elswick, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, living with his family and three servants HO 107/2404 f543 p42
1854 made first trip to the Continent, holidaying with the family in Switzerland Pumphrey
1858-08-25 m. Thomas Pumphrey (1832–1911, grocer of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, s. of Thomas and Rachel Pumphrey), Sunderland RD Annual Monitor; Old York Scholars' Association (1971) Bootham School Register. London: Oyez Press; GRO index; Bootham 4.2:168, Oct 1908
Children: Emma Louisa (1861–1950), Thomas Walter (1863–1931), Bernard (1865–1931), Martyn (1868–1945), Rachel (1871–1873) censuses; Annual Monitor; OYSA (1971); Claire Williams (1982) 'A Chart of the Descendants of John Richardson 1799–1959 Tanner of Newcastle upon Tyne and Sarah Jane Balkwill 1802–1889 of Plymouth' (photocopy of MS wheel chart)
1861 living with her family and two house servants at Ovington, Northumberland PRO RG 9/3856 f121 p18
1871 living at 6 Summerhill Grove, Westgate, Newcastle, with her family and three servants RG 10/5072 f81 p27
1881 living at 6 Summerhill Grove, Westgate, with her family, a housemaid, and a cook RG 11/5049 f72 p20
1891 living at 6 Summerhill Grove, Westgate, with her family, a domestic servant, and a cook RG 12/4192 f91 p16
1896-04-09 of Summerhill Grove, Newcastle on Tyne Bensham Grove visitors' books
1899-08-01 travelled with her husband in the sixth carriage at the funeral of William Jones, at Bishopwearmouth Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1899-08-01
1901 living at 6 Summerhill Grove, Westgate, with her family, a cook, and a housemaid RG 13/4767 f59 p17
1904 of 6 Summerhill Grove, Newcastle; with husband, gave Frank and Mary Pollard a dining room tablecloth, for their wedding present Mary S.W. Pollard, list of wedding presents
1911 living with her husband and elder daughter at 6 Summerhill Grove, Newcastle-on-Tyne, with two servants, and a sick & monthly nurse; 11 rooms RG14PN30637 RG78PN1754 RD558 SD4 ED21 SN230
1918 of 6 Summerhill Grove Pumphrey
1924-02-17 of 6 Summerhill Grove, Newcastle-upon-Tyne; d. Newcastle upon Tyne RD National Probate Calendar; GRO index
1924-05-01 will proved at Newcastle by sons Thomas Walter Pumphrey and Bernard Pumphrey; effects £15,873 11s. 10d. National Probate Calendar


David Richardson06. David Richardson

1835-03-03 b. Summerhill Grove, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland TNA: PRO RG 6/404, /1149; censuses; Old York Scholars' Association (1971) Bootham School Register. London: Oyez Press; Edward H. Milligan (2007) Biographical Dictionary of British Quakers in Commerce and Industry 1775-1920. York: Sessions Book Trust
1841 of East Law, Ebchester, living with his family and four female servants PRO HO 107/301/9 f4 p3
  pupil at Bruce's Academy, Newcastle-on-Tyne Annual Monitor
1845 at Lawrence Street school, York OYSA (1971)
1846/1851 at Bootham school, York
1851 scholar, of Bootham, St Giles, York, Yorkshire HO 107/2353 f230 p30
1856-03-11 at the Conversazione at the Lit. & Phil., exhibited a galvanic machine in action, executed by himself Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury, 1856-03-15
before 1861 agricultural machine maker Milligan (2007)
1861 tanner, living with family and a cook at 4 Summerhill Grove, Westgate, Newcastle-upon-Tyne PRO RG 9/3812 f45 p8
1861-05-20 member of the local committee for the International Exhibition of 1862 Newcastle Journal, 1861-05-21
1861 m. Catherine Fry (1838–1919, of Culmstock, Devon, d. of Robert and Jane Fry), at Woodgate, Somerset Annual Monitor; OYSA (1971); Milligan (2007); Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury, 1861-07-13; marriage not found in GRO index
Children: Hugh (1864–1936), Arthur (1865–1928), Edith (1867–1934), Lawrence (1869–1953), Gilbert Hancock (1871–1950), Catherine Mary (1874–1957), Lewis Fry (1881–1953) GRO index; OYSA (1971); Oxford Dictionary of National Biography; Claire Williams (1982) 'A Chart of the Descendants of John Richardson 1799–1959 Tanner of Newcastle upon Tyne and Sarah Jane Balkwill 1802–1889 of Plymouth' (photocopy of MS wheel chart)
1864-04-11 of Rye Hill Mosscroft visitors' book
1871 leather manufacturer, of 29 Rye Hill, Elswick, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, living with family, a nurse, and two domestic servants RG 10/5075 f77 p6
1873 member of International Jury, Vienna Bootham 3.1:7
1878-06-08 at the International Cattle Show, that formed part of the Paris Universal Exhibition, was juror in the Leather and Skins class Newcastle Courant, 1878-06-14; Bootham 3.1:7
1880-01-02 of the Gables, Elswick Road Newcastle Courant, 1880-01-02
1880-06-14 chaired a meeting of the subscribers to the Elswick Park Memorial Drinking Fountain Newcastle Courant, 1880-06-18
1881 poor law guardian, leather manuf (master), of The Gables, Elswick, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, living with family, a nurse, a cook, a housemaid, and an under housemaid RG 11/5051 f89 p2
1881-09-30

It has hitherto, I believe, been a moot point, whether the Romans, possessed the art of making steel or not. The discoveries at Binchester prove that, at any rate, at the ancient city of Vinovium, they possessed the metal itself. To Mr David Richardson, of The Gables, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, is due the credit of making this discovery, which is certainly an important one.

Newcastle Courant, 1881-09-30
1881-10-10 delivered the address at the Temperance Society meeting in the Temperance Hall, Nelson Street Newcastle Courant, 1881-10-14
1883-11-27 of The Gables Bensham Grove visitors' books
1884-05-13 chaired a Temperance meeting at the Central Hall, Newcastle Shields Daily Gazette, 1884-05-14
1885-04-09 moved a resolution at the annual meeting of the supporters of the North-Eastern Association for the Repeal of the Contagious Diseases Acts Newcastle Courant, 1885-04-10
1888-03-27 chaired a meeting to consider the formation of a society for the total prohibition of the liquor traffic, at Lockhart's Cocoa Rooms, Clayton Street, Newcastle Newcastle Courant, 1888-03-30
1888-12-07 addressed a meeting at Newcastle, at which a protest was adopted against the ensuing military operations at Suakim Sunderland Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1888-12-08
1888 president, Newcastle Branch United Kingdom Alliance Edgar B. Collinson, ed. (1935) Bootham School Register
1890-07-21 leather manufacturer, of The Gables, Newcastle-upon-Tyne; co-executor of the will of his brother James National Probate Calendar
1891 leather manufacturer, employer, of The Gables, Elswick, Newcastle on Tyne, living with family, a nurse, a housemaid, and a cook RG 12/4197 f115 p38
1896 of The Gables, Elswick The Friend; The British Friend
1896-02-01 of The Gables Bensham Grove visitors' books
1896-05-16
1896-09-14 of Elswick
1896-12-25 of The Gables, Elswick
1897 of The Gables, Elswick Road, Newcastle; subscriber to Robert Spence Watson's History of the Literary and Philosophical Society of Newcastle upon Tyne Lit&Phil
1898-12-26 of The Gables, Elswick Bensham Grove visitors' books
1900-07-17
1900-12-25
1900-12-25/1901-01-13 held a Show of Arts & Crafts at The Gables, Newcastle
1901 leather manufacturer, employer, of "The Gables", Gloster Ter., Elswick, Newcastle, living with his family, a cook, and a housemaid RG 13/4772 f87 p1
1910-07-16 one of the speakers at the demonstration on the Town Moor in favour of the Women's Franchise Bill (representing Temperance) Newcastle Journal, 1910-07-16
1910-08-25

president of the Northern Union of Mechanics' Institutes. At their conference at Stocksfield, "The proceedings were rendered more than usually noteworthy by what one of the delegates aptly termed a memorable address by the president, Mr. David Richardson, a well-known member of the Society of Friends, who took as his subject the British Navy, and made the remarkable pronouncement that England would be safer without any fleet at all.

Newcastle Journal, 1910-08-26
1911 leather manufacturer of sheep, goat, seal and oxhide leathers, employer, of The Gables, Elswick Rd, Newcastle on Tyne, living with family, three servants, and a visiting missionary RG14PN30600 RG78PN1753 RD558 SD3 ED22 SN1
  Trained as a chemist and became a successful director of the family leather manufacturing business, developing improved methods of tanning to produce high quality leather. Oxford DNB
1913-10-20 leather manufacturer, of The Gables, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, and of Wheel Birks, near Stocksfield, Northumberland; d. at The Gables, of a heart attack Annual Monitor; National Probate Calendar; OYSA (1971); Milligan (2007); diary of Mary S.W. Pollard
1913-11

IN David Richardson, who died suddenly in Newcastle, on October 20th, Bootham loses one of its oldest Old Scholars and the father of an honoured master, Hugh Richardson. Few men served their principles with greater devotion and keener service. The energy he threw into his advocacy of temperance and peace made him respected not only within the Society of Friends, whose ideals he held whole-heartedly, but among all those who had faith in great causes. He was as well a keen business man, thoroughly master of his craft, and his knowledge had been turned to public account in the Paris Exhibition of 1878, and again at Vienna.

He was a prominent member of the United Kingdom Alliance, and had been President of the North of England Temperance League and of the Newcastle Temperance Society.

He was at school from 1845 to 1851, and he was the same age and stood next in musters to Henry Tuke Mennell.

Bootham 6.5:345
  summarised his life's occupation as the utilization of waste:—in materials and products and persons Collinson, ed. (1935)
1914-02-18 will proved at Newcastle-upon-Tyne by sons Hugh and Lawrence; effects £75,238 19s. 4d. National Probate Calendar
net personalty £41,248 13s. 6d; left his leasehold at the Gables to his wife, and his Wheel Birks estate and the effects there to his son Hugh; all other property to his wife for life, with remainder to his children equally Newcastle Journal, 1914-03-06
 

DAVID RICHARDSON      78    20 10 1913

Newcastle-on-Tyne.

David Richardson, of The Gables, Newcastle-on-Tyne, was born in 1835, the sixth child of John and Sarah Richardson, who then lived in Summerhill Grove.

Out of a rather delicate childhood, he developed, if not a very robust manhood, one singularly free from illness, so that it was noted on his sudden death in his 79th year, that it was 17 years since he had consulted a doctor. No doubt his active and abstemious habits contributed to this, as also the care exercised by his parents in seeking a country life for him in his early years.

He came from Quaker parentage on both sides, his mother being Sarah Balkwill, of Plymouth. She was fond, among other lively narrations, of telling her children how often when a child she ran home from school terrified at the cry, "Bony's coming," as ships were sighted making for Plymouth Harbour; and how as a girl of thirteen she was taken out in a boat to see Bonaparte before he was transported St. Helena on the Bellerophon. She saw him then in his characteristic attitude, arms folded across the breast.

Out of her twelve children four died in childhood, and one, a son of much promise, from consumption at the age of nineteen.

After the period of home-taught lessons, David Richardson was sent to Bruce's Academy in Percy Street, Newcastle. Dr. Bruce became well-known for his researches and book on the Roman Wall. He used to walk along the wall once every year, and some still living can recall his picturesque figure, as he lectured to fellow antiquaries on the uplands of Northumbria. A recumbent figure of him may be seen in the old Church of St. Nicholas, now called the Cathedral. David Richardson was too young to imbibe his master's love for antiquities, but the collection of Roman coins he made in after years was considered a good and fairly complete one.

From Dr. Bruce's school he went to Bootham, York. There his distaste for some branches of learning, notably the dead languages, led John Ford, the then Head Master, to shake his head with a wonder as to his future career. A little more insight might have led him to predict, from the scientific bent of the observant lad, a good measure of success.

The young Friends of that period, to whom a university education with its widening influence was debarred, sought to remedy this defect by forming themselves into associations of their own. To one of these David Richardson joined himself on leaving school. Some of the youths of that period in Newcastle became more widely known, of whom we may mention Dr Spence Watson, President of the Liberal Federation, Dr G. S. Brady, F.R.S., Daniel Oliver, Curator at Kew Gardens, John Dixon, engineer, who brought the Cleopatra Needle to the Thames Embankment, Jeremiah Head, of the firm Head and Wrightson, and John Wigham Richardson, shipbuilder.

In this way of self-education much knowledge was gathered, to which he gave practical application in collections of minerals, fossils, coins, and early editions of printed books.

It is an often-repeated difficulty with fathers to know how to launch their sons on a hopeful and profitable career. David Richardson's first business venture in agricultural machine making was not successful, owing to the failure of the partner chosen. After this he entered his father's leather manufacturing business, then in Newgate Street, Newcastle-on-Tyne. In this connexion he was chosen a juryman at the Exhibitions of Vienna in 1873, and of Paris, 1878.

He never entered political life, but as a Guardian of the Poor, felt so deeply the need of reforms they were powerless to carry out, that he retired from the Board, saying his energies should be directed to what he considered was remedial of evil, rather than merely palliative. With this in view, he gave much time and thought to Temperance work. He believed that excessive drinking was the cause of widely ramifying evils in the nation; that the excess was closely connected with the badness of the houses in which large numbers of the people lived, and the nature of their employment; thirdly, that even a moderate consumption of alcohol cost an undue proportion of the artisan's earnings; and, lastly, that the conditions under which he obtained it were very unsatisfactory. With the help of others, he erected a Temperance Institute near his country home, and in Newcastle he bought a house among the working class population as restaurant and recreation rooms, on which were chiselled the following words:---

"Lord, from Thy Throne above,

Sorrow look down upon:

      God bless the Poor.

Teach them true liberty,

Set them from tyrants free,

Let their homes happy be:

      God bless the Poor."

To his relatives he said, referring to this:

"I wish to promote among the drinking classes a divine discontent with their surroundings, and an aspiration for something better."

He was a familiar figure in many gatherings in Newcastle, and in this connexion, in July, 1913, a large company assembled at his town residence, The Gables, to meet Joseph Malins, Grand Chief Templar, who had motored from Carlisle, and addressed the assembly in the garden.

His country estate at Wheelbirks, Stocksfield-on-Tyne, became known to many. The property was bought in a somewhat derelict condition, but in the course of thirty years he very greatly improved the estate, amongst other things renewing the worn-out cottages and adding new ones. In this health-giving occupation he took great delight. His hospitality was largely exercised in this country home, and his thoughts were constantly turned to making it useful to others, in a variety of ways. Boys' brigades camped in the woods, and parties of young people year after year rejoiced in Christmas walks, ending up with bonfires and hospitable entertainment. Workers from a noisy town, seeking refreshment in fine air and charming scenery, were exhorted to bring baskets to carry away the fruit and flowers he loved to cultivate.

The walls that bound this Wheelbirks property are inscribed with thoughts. On one a neighbouring clergyman founded a sermon, inviting David Richardson to come to hear it. Others give food for reflection to the passing wayfarer. Beside these inscriptions he placed substantial stone seats. That they appeal to the traveller was shown by a paragraph in a newspaper calling attention to them.

It may interest some to know what these inscriptions are. On a bridge over a stream, near a bathing pool, we find:---

"Be sure your work is better than what you work to get."

On another bridge near an old Roman road:---

"Does the road wind uphill all the way?"

recalling the continuing lines---

"Is there for the night a resting-place?"

     Yea, beds for all who come."

On one of the well-build cottages:---

"A stone that is fit for a Wall will not be left in the Way."

A road that bounds this property on one side has a local interest, as along it, before railway days, lead was laboriously carted from Allendale to the River Tyne. It is hence called "the Lead Road." Here, near one of the many seats he erected, is Bacon's advice to "Friends in Council" :---

"It is good in conversation to vary speech of present occasion with experience of the past---fact with argument---tales with reason---question with opinion---jest with earnest---but tiresome to press discourse too far."

On another wall, bounding some waste land, to be re-planted:---

"Be fruitful and multiply;

Replenish the earth and subdue it."

To take raw material, human or otherwise, and lift it on to a higher plane, was the work of his life. By unostentatious labour this was done.

His note-books of travel, illustrated with drawings, are evidences of the care with which he noted what often escapes unseen.

He made a considerable collection of early editions of Bibles, which he presented to Armstrong College in his native town. One of the last visits he paid, three days before his death, was to the authorities in that College, to urge the claims of a peaceful over a warlike spirit in its students. Could he have foreseen that within a year that building, erected for the promotion of all the enlightening sciences and arts, would be entirely converted into a hospital for those wounded in the most desperate war ever waged, his faith in the advance of humanity would have received a shock.

In 1912 he was appointed President of the Association of Mechanics' Institutes, and read a paper on the Waste of War, and preferable Internal Reforms. The concluding words of his address were:---

"We are endowed with the faculties of music for noble ends, with the ability to look both forward and backward on the history of our race, with powers of reason, with invention, discovery, memory and foresight---not that we may practice the black arts of barbaric, civilized and scientific war, but that we may love, admire, and practice the lessons of the Prince of Peace."

The roots of a man's spiritual life are deeply hidden, but the prints of it can be seen. In his care for others and efforts to help them; in the denial of luxuries for himself, and the bestowal of kindnesses in hidden ways; in patient and laborious attendance at gatherings for the promotion of temperance, to the last days of his life, we see the flowers springing from these hidden roots. As a member of the Society of Friends, he rarely missed either the business or religious meetings, and he acknowledged how often the cares and burdens with which he had entered the service had rolled away, and he had felt strengthened for the further work of life.

With hear and mind full of thoughts and plans for the benefit of others, he retired to rest on the evening of Oct. 19, 1913, and after a heart attack, peacefully entered the unseen world on the morning of the 20th, like a vessel laden with merchandise, its sails all set for a desired haven.

In 1861 he had married Catharine Fry, daughter of Robert and Jane Fry, of Woodgate, Devon, who was his faithful coadjutor in hospitable receptions, and who, as Secretary of the British Women's Temperance Association in Newcastle, through a long course of years, furthered his work in that direction. Their five sons and two daughters all survive.

No one would have been more surprised than himself at the many tributes received by his family on his death. A university don wrote:---

"I have a vivid impression that his personality made on me when I came to Newcastle as quite a young man, in 1886. The inflexible adherence to principle, the zeal for reform and good works, combined with an unfailing geniality and unbounded courtesy and hospitality to a stranger like myself, made a deep impression, which was strengthened during the years in which I was a constant visitor at the Gables."

And a Newcastle citizen writes:---

"I had the privilege of working with Mr Richardson, and he always inspired me with admiration for his integrity and single-mindedness. He was a member of an old school of Englishmen, of whom we always had too few, and of whom there are fewer than there used to be. To know him was to revere him; I count it a privilege to have had the honour of being associated with him in however small a degree."

In thinking of him the words seem realized:---

"We faint not; though our outward man is decaying, our inward man is renewed day by day; while we look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen. For the things which are seen are temporal, but the things which are not seen are eternal."

 

1915 Annual Monitor (with photo)


Sarah Ann Richardson07. Sarah Ann Richardson (Sally)

1836-09-26 b. Summerhill Grove, St John, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland TNA: PRO RG 6/404, /1149; censuses [cal 1837]
1841 of East Law, Ebchester, living with his family and four female servants PRO HO 107/301/9 f4 p3
1850-01/1853-06 of Newcastle; at Mount School, York The Mount School, York. List of Teachers and Scholars 1784-1816, 1831-1906. 1906, York: Sessions
1851 scholar, pupil, of 1 Castlegate, St Mary, York, Yorkshire HO 107/2353 f525 p19
1861 of 4 Summerhill Grove, Westgate, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, living with family and a cook at 4 Summerhill Grove, Westgate, Newcastle-upon-Tyne RG 9/3812 f45 p8
1871 annuitant, living at 4 Summerhill Grove, Westgate, with her mother and two domestic servants RG 10/5072 f81 p28
1874-03-04 played Doctors in Macbeth at Mosscroft Mosscroft visitors' book
1881 living at 4 Summerhill Grove, Westgate, with her mother, a cook, and two housemaids RG 11/5049 f72 p20
1883-12-25 of 4 Summerhill Grove, Newcastle Bensham Grove visitors' books
1888-01-24 of Summerhill Grove
1891-04 "Ruth is in Wiesbaden again with my sister Carrie, & S.A R. & Lena Richardson" . . . Elizabeth Spence Watson's "Family Chronicles"
1891 not found in census  
1898-01-24 of Hexham Bensham Grove visitors' books
1898-11-24
1901 living on own means, of 1 Silver St, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, with her sister and two nieces boarding with George C. Ellis, college servt RG 13/1532 f104 p13
1901-06-12 of Hexham Bensham Grove visitors' books
1907-03-19 "Caro left for Algeria with John and S.A.R." Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1911 of Eden Mount, Wetheral, Carlisle, Cumberland, living with her sister, her niece and family, a nurse, a housemaid, and a cook; 15 rooms RG14PN31297 RG78PN1795 RD574 SD1 ED1 SN36
1929-06-03 of Ashfield House, Elswick-road, Newcastle-upon-Tyne; d. Newcastle upon Tyne RD National Probate Calendar; GRO index
1929-08-23 will proved at Newcastle by James Alaric Richardson and Bernard Pumphrey; effects £8881 9s. 5d. National Probate Calendar


Jane (Richardson) Sturge08. Jane Richardson (Jennie)

1838-02-05 b. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland censuses; ACAD - A Cambridge Alumni Database
1841 of East Law, Ebchester, living with his family and four female servants TNA: PRO HO 107/301/9 f4 p3
1850/1853 of Newcastle; at The Mount School, York The Mount School, York. List of Teachers and Scholars 1784-1816, 1831-1906. 1906, York: Sessions
1851 scholar, pupil, of 1 Castlegate, St Mary Castlegate, York HO 107/2353 f525 p19
1861 of 4 Summerhill Grove, Westgate, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, living with family and a cook at 4 Summerhill Grove, Westgate, Newcastle-upon-Tyne PRO RG 9/3812 f45 p8
1871 not found in census  
1871 met John Edmund Sturge at the Social Science Conference in Newcastle, while Sturge was visiting from Montserrat Trade Connections Between Birmingham and the West Indies, accessed 2010-05-03
1872/1873-01 at Newnham College, Cambridge ACAD
1873-06-05 m. John Edmund Sturge (1842–1880, lime juice manufacturer, of Montserrat, s. of Edmund and Lydia Sturge), Newcastle RD The Mount School, York. List of Teachers and Scholars 1784–1816, 1831–1906; Old York Scholars' Association (1971) Bootham School Register. London: Oyez Press; Annual Monitor; Trade Connections Between Birmingham and the West Indies; ACAD; GRO index
1872/1873 a splendidly located house, known as 'The Cot', was built for the couple, high on the side of Olveston mountain, Montserrat Sturge Family – The Montserrat Connection, accessed 2010-05-03
1873/1879 of Montserrat Sturge Family – The Montserrat Connection; Trade Connections Between Birmingham and the West Indies; ACAD
1874

I have omitted to mention one or two things wh. ought to be recorded. One is the marriage of my cousin Jennie to John Edmund Sturge, a very happy marriage except for the obstacle of distance from her friends. They live far off at Montserrat, but extremely enjoy the climate, & the beauty of the scenery, & Jennie gets on admirably with the negroes.

Elizabeth Spence Watson's "Family Chronicles"
Children: Hilda (1876–1972), Olga (1878–1971), Elfrida (1879–1969) censuses; Claire Williams (1982) 'A Chart of the Descendants of John Richardson 1799–1959 Tanner of Newcastle upon Tyne and Sarah Jane Balkwill 1802–1889 of Plymouth' (photocopy of MS wheel chart)
1880-03-27 of 4 Summerhill-grove, Newcastle-upon-Tyne; co-executor of her husband's will National Probate Calendar; Glasgow Herald, 1880-04-24
1881 not found in census  
1883-08-30 of York Lodge, Bayshill, Cheltenham Bensham Grove visitors' books
1883-12-25 of Cheltenham
1884-01-04 of York Lodge, Cheltenham
1884-09-11 of Cheltenham
1884-12-25
1886-01-03
1891 independent, of York Lodge, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, living with her family, two nieces, a cook, and a housemaid RG 12/2048 f16 p27
1899-11-10 of Hexham Bensham Grove visitors' books
1900-07-19 of Maiden Cross, Hexham
1901 living on own means, at 1 Silver St, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, with two daughters and her sister boarding with George C. Ellis, college servt RG 13/1532 f104 p13
1903-01-25 of Maiden Cross, Hexham Bensham Grove visitors' books
1904 of Maidencross, Hexham; gave Frank & Mary Pollard a chair, for their wedding present Mary S.W. Pollard, list of wedding presents
1911 of Eden Mount, Wetheral, Carlisle, Cumberland, living with her sister, her daughter and family, a nurse, a housemaid, and a cook; 15 rooms RG14PN31297 RG78PN1795 RD574 SD1 ED1 SN36
1918-02-05

A very lovely fete at Ashfield House in honour of Jane Sturge's 80th birthday. Theo and I—Lizzie, Kate, Sarah Ann and Jane S. those present at the sumptuous lunch. S.A. the originator of it all. Olga and Freda there!

Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1932 of 183 Huntingdon Road, Cambridge H. Winifred Sturge, ed. (n.d. [1932]) A Register of Old Scholars of The Mount School, York 1931-1932. Leominster: The Orphans' Printing Press
  The home, whether in West Indies, Cheltenham, Newcastle-on-Tyne or Cambridge, a centre of intellectual and social interest and of hospitality. Sturge (1932)
1934-09-20 of 183 Huntingdon-road, Cambridge; d. Cambridge RD National Probate Calendar; GRO index; ACAD
1934-12-12 will proved at London by Olga (Sturge) Ball and Elfrida Cameron; effects £9976 5s. 4d. National Probate Calendar


09. Maria Richardson

1840 Q2 b. Newcastle upon Tyne RD Annual Monitor; GRO index
1841 of East Law, Ebchester, living with his family and four female servants TNA: PRO HO 107/301/9 f4 p3
1845-07-13 of Newcastle; d. Annual Monitor


portrait in oils of Henry Richardson10. Henry Richardson (Harry)

1841-08-10 b. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland censuses; Old York Scholars' Association (1971) Bootham School Register. London: Oyez Press
1851 scholar, in household of Robert Doeg, schoolmaster, at Harraby, Cumberland TNA: PRO HO 107/2429 f167 p3
1856/1858 at Bootham School, York OYSA (1971)
1861 pupil collier viewer, of 4 Summerhill Grove, Westgate, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, living with family and a cook at 4 Summerhill Grove, Westgate, Newcastle-upon-Tyne PRO RG 9/3812 f45 p8
1863-11-05 of Cramlington Mosscroft visitors' book
1865-03-02 elected as a new member of the North of England Institute of Mining Engineers, at a general meeting at the Institute's rooms in Westgate Street, Newcastle Mining Institute, accessed 2010-05-03
1865-08-10 of Forest Hall, near Benton,  Northumberland; m. Emily Watson (1844–1913), at Newcastle-upon-Tyne Friends' meeting-house marriage digest; The Friend; The British Friend
 

. . . on the 10th Emily Watson, my sister in law, was married to Henry Richardson my first cousin. The day went off very satisfactorily—the bride looked lovely, & spoke well, the bridesmaids looked very pretty in their light floating white muslins—the breakfast was excellent, partaken of in a tent in the field, & the afternoon drive to Gibside, & evening party very enjoyable. The young couple went off to Derby, thence to Devonshire. They are now settled in their pretty home at Forest Hall near Benton—

Elizabeth Spence Watson's "Family Chronicles"
1866-08-24/-25 of Forest Hall, Benton Mosscroft visitors' book
Children: Henry (1868–1868), Harold Joseph (1869–1911), Helen (1871–1902), Olive Mary (1881–1956) child's birth & death certificates; Annual Monitor; The Friend; GRO index
1868 mining engineer, of Backworth, Earsdon, Tynemouth, Northumberland child's birth & death certificates
1869 colliery viewer, of Backworth Lodge, Earsdon, Tynemouth child's birth certificate
1870-01-11 of Backworth Lodge Mosscroft visitors' book
1870-12-25 colly viewer, of Backworth; initiated as a Freemason in the Northumberland Lodge at Newcastle, on the same day as Robert Spence Watson Library and Museum of Freemasonry; London, England; Freemasonry Membership Registers; Description: Register of Contributions: Country and Foreign Lodges, 966-1050 (1832); 668-748 (1863)
1871-02-07 'passed' at the Masonic Lodge Register of Contributions: Country and Foreign Lodges, 966-1050
1871 mining engineer, of The Lodge, Backworth, Earsdon, living with his family, a ladies' nurse, a cook, a nurse, and a housemaid RG 10/5128 f30 p24; child's birth certificate
1872-04-23 of Backworth Lodge Mosscroft visitors' book
1872-08-01 of Backworth
1872-12-25 of Backworth Lodge
1873-06-25/-27 of Backworth; stayed at Mosscroft
1873-12-25 of Backworth Lodge
1874-03-15 of Backworth
1874-12-08
1875-05-29 viewer, of Backworth; opened the Grand Bazaar of the Primitive Methodist Society, Ashington Colliery Morpeth Herald, 1875-05-22
1875-09-24 took the chair at the inauguration of the Ashington Mechanics' Institute Morpeth Herald, 1875-09-11
1876-03-21 "Harry & Emily R. are also there with their children" [in Bournemouth] Elizabeth Spence Watson's "Family Chronicles"
1876-05-27 took the chair at the public meeting following the laying of the foundation of a new chapel at the Ashington Colliery Morpeth Herald, 1876-05-13
1878-08-09 of Backworth, Newcastle-on-Tyne; at the Northumberland Agricultural Society Annual Show at Alnwick, won 2nd prize (£6) for shorthorn bulls above two and under three years old, for "Cheveley" Newcastle Courant, 1878-08-16
by 1879-01-25 subscribed £5 for relief of distress among local miners Morpeth Herald, 1879-01-25
by 1879-03-27 colliery viewer; nominated as a Guardian for Cramlington Shields Daily Gazette, 1879-03-27
1880-05-02 viewer, Backworth Lodge; presided at a meeting at the new Mechanics' Institute, Backworth, on the Miners and University Education Morpeth Herald, 1880-05-29
1880-11-06 read a paper to the North of England Mining Institute, entitled "Description of a sinking set fitted with new windbore protector and suction regulator".

Mr. Richardson said, he had recently been engaged in sinking, and had experienced the very trouble he had described. He had not yet adopted the improvement, but should he do so, he would communicate to the members the result of the application.

address online at Mining Institute
1881 mining engineer, of 5 Osborne Road, Jesmond, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland, living with family, a governess, and three general servants RG 11/5070 f17 p27
1881-07-13 of Backworth Lodge Bensham Grove visitors' books
1881-11-04 of Backworth
1882-06-01 of 5 Osborne Road
1882-12-25 of Backworth Lodge
1883-03-16
1883-08-10 of Backworth
1883-09-25
1883-11-07 of Backworth Lodge
1883-12-25
1885-12-25 of Backworth
1887-12-26
1887/1890 secretary; vice-president [not clear of what] Newcastle Libraries' photostream
by 1889-08-03 member of Northumberland County Council Newcastle Courant, 1889-08-03
1890-07-21 colliery viewer, of Backworth, Northumberland; co-executor of the will of his brother James National Probate Calendar
1891 mining engineer, employer, visitor at the Central Station Hotel, St John's, Newcastle RG 12/4208 f119 p12
1891-05-02 elected chairman of the Cramlington Local Board Morpeth Herald, 1891-05-09
1891-05-23 had supervised the working staff of the Backworth and West Cramlington Collieries for the last 30 years Shields Daily Gazette, 1891-06-01
1891-11-02 mining engineer; headed the poll for the Backworth School Board, with 205 votes Morpeth Herald, 1891-11-07
1893-05-06 re-elected as chairman of the Tynemouth Board of Guardians, which position he has occupied for some years Newcastle Courant, 1893-05-06
1895-08-23 of 4 Windser Crescent Bensham Grove visitors' books
1895-12-25 of Newcastle - Tyne
1896-12-25 of Newcastle
1897-03-06
1898-12-26 of Backworth
1899-06-14 chief agent of the Ashington Coal Co., and an expert in the management of mines; had acted as arbitrator between the Guardians of the Sunderland Union and the Wearmouth Colliery Co., Ltd, respecting the assessment of the Wearmouth Colliery Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1899-06-14
1899-11-10 of Tudor House N.C. Bensham Grove visitors' books
1899-12-25 of Tudor Lodge, Newcastle - Tyne
1900-12-25
1901 mining engineer J.P., own acc., of Tudor Lodge, Osborne Rd, Jesmond, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, living with his family, a cook, a waiting maid, and a housemaid, with a visiting nephew, Percy Corder RG 13/4782 f172 p47
1901-02-05 of London Bensham Grove visitors' books
1902-05-23 administrator of the will of his daughter Helen National Probate Calendar
1902-06-13

Mr Sargent is painting a portrait of Mr Henry Richardson, one of the best-known among "colliery viewers," as they are called in the North of England. In other parts of the country the term is not viewer, but agent. Mr Richardson has, for thirty years or more, been the viewer of the Ashington Coal Company, and in the Morpeth District no man has a higher standing as a mining expert than he. The portrait is a presentation one; and next year at the Royal Academy the viewer will be viewed with especial interest by visitors from Tyneside.

Shields Daily Gazette, 1902-06-13
1911 private means, with his younger daughter boarders at an unnamed hotel at 29 Queen Anne's Gate, Westminster, London S.W. RG14PN491 RG78PN16 RD5 SD3 ED26 SN106
  colliery engineer (retd), of St Ermin's Hotel, St James's Park, Westminster, London S.W. Edgar B. Collinson, ed. (1935) Bootham School Register
1913 of 75 Victoria Street, Westminster, London S.W. The Friend
1914-05-12 of Westminster; d. at Newcastle-upon-Tyne GRO index; Annual Monitor; The Friend
colliery viewer, of the Grand Hotel, Newcastle-upon-Tyne; d. National Probate Calendar
1914-07-28 will proved at Newcastle by Olive Mary (Richardson) Macartney, William Spelman Burton, and Percy Corder; effects £45,167 4s.


11. Rachel Richardson

1842-12 b. Claire Williams (1982) 'A Chart of the Descendants of John Richardson 1799-1959 Tanner of Newcastle upon Tyne and Sarah Jane Balkwill 1802-1889 of Plymouth' (photocopy of MS wheel chart); source for month misplaced
1843-10-24 d. Newcastle upon Tyne RD Williams (1982); GRO index; source for exact date misplaced


Joseph Hancock Richardson12. Joseph Hancock Richardson

1844-02-08 b. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland PRO HO 107/2404 f543 p42; 1875 Annual Monitor; Old York Scholars' Association (1971) Bootham School Register. London: Oyez Press; GRO index
1851 at home, at Elswick Lane, Elswick, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, living with his family and three servants PRO HO 107/2404 f543 p42
1856/1858 at Bootham School, York OYSA (1971)
1861 chemist and druggist (ap.), in household of aunt Ann Balkwill, at Swilly Lodge, Stoke Damerel, Devon; one servant in household PRO RG 9/1454 f85 p28
1865-11-18 of Newcastle Mosscroft visitors' book
1867-04-03 of 4 Summerhill Grove, N.C.
1867-05-10 of N.C.
1868-05 m. Anna Mary Balkwill (1839–1914, d. of Joseph Hancock and Ann Balkwill), Plymouth Annual Monitor; OYSA (1971); 1875 Annual Monitor; FreeBMD
1868-09-30 of Bensham Ter. Mosscroft visitors' book
1871 not found in census  
  chemist and manufacturer, pharmaceutical chemist to Wm & H. Goulding, of Cork, Ireland OYSA (1971); Edgar B. Collinson, ed. (1935) Bootham School Register
 

Member Pharm. Society: Member Newcastle Nat. Hist Society: Won a Silver Cup for rowing (along with 3 others): Head of Cork International Order of Good Templars: Hobbies—Botany, ornithology, birds' eggs—large and good collection, supplemented by John Hancock: Presented collection of shales to Newcastle Museum:

Collinson, ed. (1935)
1873-12-11 formerly of Bensham-terrace, Gateshead, Durham, and late of Arundel-terrace, Blackrock-road, Co. Cork, mineral oil refiner; d. at Arundel-terrace Annual Monitor; National Probate Calendar; OYSA (1971); MI
 

In 1868 Anna Mary married her cousin, Joseph H. Richardson, and for a while lived in Gateshead. The burning of her husband's oil factory, however, led to their removal to Cork, where they lived in loving fellowship with their Irish neighbours, and worked heartily and successfully in the Temperance cause, sparing no efforts for the religious and moral uplifting of those around them.

In consequence of his removal to another house, Joseph H. Richardson caught a violent chill, which ended fatally after a very brief illness, and the six short years of happy companionship and united endeavour were over.

1916 Annual Monitor, s.v. Anna Mary Richardson
 

Then my first cousin Joseph H. Richardson was taken ill, & died after a short illness & much suffering. They lived in Cork, & the funeral took place there, but his poor wife will return to Plymouth to her mother's home. Poor Jennie at Montserrat would hear the sad news about a fortnight afterwards. My cousin was only 29 years old when he died, & was thus taken in the prime of manhood, & in the midst of a useful career.

Elizabeth Spence Watson's "Family Chronicles"
 

Joseph Hancock Richardson died after a short and severe illness of ten days duration; and it is hoped that in reading this short account of his brief bright life and early death, some may be stimulated to apply themselves with fresh courage to the battle of life, and to seek for that heavenly armour which alone will make them "more than conquerors."

He was born in Newcastle on-Tyne on the 8th of Second month, 1844, the beloved youngest son of John and Sarah Richardson (the former deceased). His boyhood was marked by a keen interest in natural objects, which as years went on, and his mind expanded and matured, led him into a reverent and ennobling apprehension of the greatness of his Creator, and a corresponding sense of his own insignificance.

An extract from a letter, written to a friend at the age of twenty-two, will illustrate his feelings at this early period of his life. * * * "For Almighty God, the author of my existence, I feel the profoundest reverence and adoration my mind is capable of. I am as profoundly grateful for the perfect penetrating love I believe He feels for me, as well as all His creatures. I am lost in admiration of the omnipotent intellect, which has ordained the universe of matter, and the forces which control it, with such wonderful subtilty and skill, that man can only here and there understand and appreciate an effect, the causes being hid from his comprehension. Finally I feel bowed in reverent gratitude to Him for His pardoning mercies, which He extends to me, a guilty sinner, and to all men; so long-suffering, so very gracious! unlike anything we see on earth. It makes me feel, ' What is man, that Thou art mindful of him ?" At another time he writes respecting a young friend, who in his trials seemed unacquainted with the comforts of religion;— "He looks on the dark side of life, and I fear does not take his troubles to Him, 'whose yoke is easy, and whose burden is light.' " At this early date he had himself experienced Christ to be his burden-bearer.

Before his marriage, which took place at Plymouth in Fifth month, 1868, he resided for some time near Edinburgh; and while there, was greatly interested in the Industrial Museum, at that time being organized by Professor Archer, and found his way into many of the scientific laboratories; where he gathered much useful and varied knowledge, and where his eager interest in such things always gained him a welcome. After returning to Newcastle, his association with kindred minds as a member of the Natural History Society, yielded him many very happy hours.

His interest were first awakened in the Temperance cause at Plymouth, where he resided for several years after leaving school, and where at about the age of sixteen he signed the pledge. This interest increased throughout his life, causing him to take an active part in Temperance agencies; the Permissive Bill in particular claiming his warm support. He frequently entertained the often humble advocates of this cause at his own house; and held out the hand of friendship with heart and soul to any tempted brother, in the hope of helping him to rise. Thoroughly believing in the better nature of even the lowest sunk in degradation, he would labour with and for them with a Christian hopefulness. The Order of Good Templars in Cork (where the last four years of his life were spent) received his warmest co-operation; and through this instrumentality, under the Divine blessing, he was enabled to assist many and many a family out of the Slough of Despond which drinking had brought them into; paying them frequent Visits, often helping them into situations, and always encouraging them with cordial kindliness. As his term of life grew short, his earnestness deepened, and within the last few weeks, he aided in the establishment of Good Templar Lodges in Kinsale, Fermoy, Queenstown, and in the soldiers' barracks; besides taking an occasional part in three in the city itself; often giving up evening hours, that should have been spent in rest at home. Most conscientious in his duty to his employers, whose friendship and esteem were manifested on every occasion, he remained at business till within ten days of his death; when illness of an alarming and very suffering nature attacked him, causing frequent periods of unconsciousness. Between these attacks he expressed his assurance that whatever the issue might be, all would be well; often using the words, " 'tis all for the best." A letter written by one who attended him in the sick room, thus describes his state of mind, when unable to speak. "The comfort I feel in sitting by his side, looking into his dark earnest eyes, reading the peace within by the sweet smile, that always settles on the face when distress of some bodily sort does not chase it away, is more than words can describe." With his wife and others from a distance around him, he peacefully breathed his last on the morning of Fifth day, the 11th of Twelfth mo. 1873.

The nurse handed to his widow a letter he had written to her with great effort on the evening of the 8th, when she was taking a little necessary rest. In this, after a few instructions and farewell messages to his many friends, he thus sends a word of stimulating encouragement to the six young apprentices in the business previously referred to: "Try and do your duty to God and man, and never fear to face stern death. My mind is quite at rest."

 

1875 Annual Monitor
  bur. Cork City fbg, Co. Cork, Ireland Elizabeth Spence Watson's "Family Chronicles"; Ireland, Civil Registration Deaths Index, 1864-1958; MI
1874-01-29will proved at Cork by Anna Mary Richardson, widow, and James Richardson; effects in England under £3000National Probate Calendar


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