Children of Isaac and Deborah Richardson

01. David Richardson

1797-06-30 b. St John, Newcastle, Northumberland TNA: PRO RG 6/228, /404, /627
1809-12-17 of Newcastle PRO RG 6/228, /426, /777
1809-12-20 bur. Bunhill Fields, London RG 6/228, /426, /777


John Richardson 02. John Richardson

1799-04-20 b. St John, Newcastle, Northumberland TNA: PRO RG 6/404, /627
1823 of Spring Gardens, Newcastle; joined the Literary and Philosophical Society of Newcastle upon Tyne from 1824 (so joined 1823) www.litandphil.org.uk/membersr.htm
1825-10-05 of Newcastle; m. Sarah Augusta Balkwill (1802–1889, d. of Benjamin and Elizabeth Balkwill, of Plymouth), at Plymouth PRO RG 6/192, /194; Milligan (2007); 1890 Annual Monitor
1826-04 with his brother Edward, was one of the founding twelve members of the Newcastle Book Society

Ruth Sansbury (1998) Beyond the Blew Stone. 300 Years of Quakers in Newcastle. Newcastle-upon-Tyne Preparative Meeting; John William Steel (1899) A Historical Sketch of the Society of Friends 'in Scorn called Quakers' in Newcastle & Gateshead 1653–1898. London & Newcastle, Headley Bros.: 97; minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting, Tyne & Wear Archives Service MF 169

Children: Charles (1826–1846), Benjamin (1828–1831), John (1830–1831), James (1831–1890), Emma (1833–1924), David (1835–1913 [whose son was Dr Lewis Fry Richardson, FRS, 1881–1953, mathematician and pacifist—see Oxford Dictionary of National Biography; and whose grandson was Sir Ralph Richardson, 1902–1983, actor—see Oxford DNB], Sarah Ann (1836–1929), Jane (1838–1934), Maria (1840–1845), Henry (1841–1914), Rachel (1842–1843), Joseph Hancock (1844–1873). RG 6/228; censuses; Annual Monitor; Bootham School Register (1971); GRO index; Claire Williams (1982) 'A Chart of the Descendants of John Richardson 1799–1959 Tanner of Newcastle upon Tyne and Sarah Jane Balkwill 1802–1889 of Plymouth' (photocopy of MS wheel chart)
1829-04 with his brother Edward, he was executor of David Sutton’s will; each executor was paid £30 TWAS Acc. 161/4
1833/4 Newcastle directory shows the family home at 6 Summerhill Grove; the tannery, in which he was now, with Edward Richardson, a partner, was located at 66 Newgate Street - they were described as tanners, morocco leather dressers and glue makers John Wigham Richardson, ed. (1877) Memoir of Anna Deborah Richardson, printed privately:157; Ihler's Directory of Newcastle & Gateshead, 1833; Steel (1899): 66
1835 of Summerhill Grove, Newcastle upon Tyne Annual Monitor
1836 the tannery was described as being at the White Cross, Newgate Street Richardson ed. (1877): 157;  Steel (1899): 66
1837-12-01 had subscribed £5 towards the general survey and preliminary expenses of the Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Edinburgh, and Glasgow Railway Newcastle Journal, 1838-01-06
1838 a tanner in the partnership of John and Edward Richardson, tanners, Morocco leather and glue manufacturers, of 66 Newgate-street M.A. Richardson's Directory of Newcastle and Gateshead 1838; daughter's birth certificate; Northern Liberator, issue 67, 1839-01-26; Northern Liberator & Champion, issue 155, 1840-09-26
by 1838-07-14 had subscribed £5 and/or £2 2s. to the Royal Victoria Asylum for the Blind Newcastle Journal, 1838-07-14
1838-12-13 subscribed £2 for the support of the four orphan children of the late Joseph Millie, who had been murdered in the Savings' Bank Newcastle Journal, 1838-12-22
1839 In January 1839 he was co-signatory with Edward and others to an open letter to the Mayor of Newcastle, requesting that he call a public meeting with a view to petitioning Parliament over the corn laws Northern Liberator, issue 67, 1839-01-26
1840-01-04 had contributed £1 towards the scheme of the Newcastle Total Abstinence Society, for the monthly distribution of a temperance publication, to every family in the town Newcastle Journal, 1840-01-04
1841 tanner, of East Law, Ebchester, living with wife and 7 children, and four female servants, as well as a 50-year-old Joseph Richardson, clerk, of uncertain relationship HO 107/302/9 f3 p4
1842-03-21 A meeting of the master tanners, curriers, and boot and shoe manufacturers was held at the Temperance Hotel, Arcade, Newcastle, to consider the proposed alteration in the duties on the importation of livestock as affecting the leather trade, and of the duties on leather, and on boots and shoes. "Mr. John Richardson was called to the chair, who read a letter containing the resolutions passed at a meeting in London of persons connected with the leather trade, disapproving of the proposed alterations as calculated to bring foreign manufactures into unfair competition with the English manufacturers." Newcastle Journal, 1842-03-26
by 1842-12-08 had subscribed £1 1s. to the Saint Nicholas' Soup Kitchen Newcastle Journal, 1842-12-10
by 1843-01-07 had subscribed 10s. to the St. John's Soup Kitchen Newcastle Journal, 1843-01-07
1843-11-30 a director of the Newcastle-upon-Tyne Savings' Bank Newcastle Journal, 1843-12-09
1843-12-12 subscribed £1 1s. to the Saint Nicholas' Soup Kitchen Newcastle Journal, 1843-12-23
1844-12-13 one of those appointed to the committee of management of the General Soup Kitchen Newcastle Journal, 1844-12-21
1846-12-14 subscribed £1 1s. to, and appointed to the committee of, the General Soup Kitchen Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury, 1846-12-19
by 1847-01-30 had subscribed £2 for the destitution in Scotland and Ireland Newcastle Journal, 1847-01-30
1847 directory still shows the partnership of Edward and John Richardson, tanners and glew manufacturers; but by that year Edward's nephew James Richardson had taken over from his father as partner White's Newcastle & Gateshead Directory, 1847; catalogue of Tyne & Wear Archives Service
1848-01-20 appointed to the committee of the General Soup Kitchen Newcastle Journal, 1848-01-22
1848-12-22 appointed to the committee of the General Soup Kitchen Newcastle Journal, 1848-12-23
1849-12-07 appointed to the committee of the General Soup Kitchen Newcastle Journal, 1849-12-08
1849-12-14 subscribed £1 1s. towards the relief of the families of pilots drowned in the upsetting of the South Shields Life Boat Newcastle Journal, 1849-12-22
1850-11-06 one of 5 signatories to the minute of Newcastle Friends regarding gravestones Steel (1899): 217
1851 leather manuf[acture]r of Elswick Lane, Elswick, Newcastle on Tyne, living with 2 sons, daughter, and 3 servants HO 107/2404 f543 p42
1853-01-06 subscribed £2 to the new Newcastle, Northumberland, and Durham Society for the Repression of Juvenile Crime, and the Reformation of Youthful Delinquents Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury, 1853-01-08
by 1853-04-23 had donated £1 to the London Sunday School Union Jubilee Fund Newcastle Journal, 1853-04-23
1854-10-14 appointed to the committee for the relief of sufferers by the calamitous fire and explosion in Newcastle Newcastle Journal, 1854-10-14
1854-12-26 presided at the Ragged School Tea Party Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury, 1855-01-06
by 1856-07-26 had donated £5 towards liquidating the debt of the Royal Jubilee School Newcastle Journal, 1856-07-26
1856-09-16 member of a pro-temperance deputation to the Brewster Sessions at the Manors Police Court Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury, 1856-09-20
by 1856-11-08 had donated £10 to the appeal on behalf of the Infant School Society of Newcastle-upon-Tyne Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury, 1856-11-08
1856-12-04 appointed to the committee of management of the General Soup Kitchen Newcastle Journal, 1856-12-27
1856-12-06 treasurer of the Girls' Jubilee School; addressed the Charity Commissioners' official inquiry into the charities of Newcastle Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury, 1856-11-08
by 1857-01-31 had subscribed £1 for the relief of distress in Cullercoats Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury, 1857-02-07
1857 made heavy losses in the failure of the Northumberland and Durham District Bank, in which he held 1600 shares Richardson ed. (1877): 112; Newcastle Courant, 1857-11-27, 1858-05-21
by 1857-11-28 chosen as a provisional director of the Northumberland and Durham District Bank Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury, 1857-11-28
1857-12-15 confirmed as a director at a shareholders' meeting at the Royal Exchange Hotel Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury, 1857-12-19
1858-01-01 dissolution of partnership of J., E., & J. Richardson, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, tanners, as far as regards John Richardson Newcastle Journal, 1858-01-09
1859-04-26 d. very suddenly, at the Plough Inn, Kendal, Westmorland, aged 60 The Friend XVII.197:97; Annual Monitor; Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury, 1859-04-30 gives place of death as Shapwells
1859-05-01 bur. Westgate Hill General Cemetery, Northumberland. burials digest
 

The tendency of the religious teaching of the Society of Friends, under Divine guidance in everything, is towards self reliance of character, active and industrious habits, and simple tastes. John Richardson exemplified all these. He was the son of Isaac and Deborah Richardson, of Newcastle, and was educated first at Bruce's School, and was afterwards for some time under the care of Joseph Sams of Darlington—a great student and traveller of his day. Of a family who for generations had been in the tanning trade, John Richardson served an apprenticeship with his uncle John, at his tanyard in Bishopwearmouth, and on coming of age entered the business established by his father Isaac Richardson, in Newgate Street, Newcastle, and continued it with his brother Edward until death severed their close and brotherly partnership. They often combined with their business journeys the attendance of Yearly and Quarterly Meetings, travelling by coach or by sea, and took part in important meetings in London in the causes of the Abolition of slavery, of International peace, of Free trade, the Anti corn law agitation, and the first meetings of the United Kingdom Alliance in Manchester.

The annual return of the whale and seal fishing ships to Hull, or to Peterhead, Fraserburgh, and Dundee often took one or other of the brothers into Scotland necessitating large purchases. It is noteworthy that in consequence of the utilization of petroleums instead of whale and seal oils, for the first time this century no ship has this year, 1899, left Great Britain to continue this trade.

J.R. was always fond of gardening and the cultivation of vines. A mulberry tree in Summerhill Grove—probably the only one now within the City of Newcastle—is of his planting. Many drives to visit the gardens and hot-houses of country gentlemen, to inspect the bark of newly felled timber, or to and from a country house which he built in the valley of the Derwent, are remembered by his children with lively delight.

In the Society of Friends he filled the office of Overseer and Elder, being appointed to the latter station at the age of twenty-seven, and in many ways he served this section of the Christian church in which he had been born.

On returning home from a journey with his wife shortly after his marriage, he found the furniture of their dining room had been seized and taken away because he would neither serve in the militia nor pay for a substitute.

His private memoranda clearly shew his endeavour to keep in check the love of the things of this world and his desire to train up his family in the fear of the Lord. A large hearted hospitality made his home the frequent meeting place for friends and for social and religious gatherings.

As one of the largest shareholders in the Northumberland and Durham District Banking Company, its collapse in the dark days of 1857 involved him in the loss of much of his property. No law for limiting liability was then in existence. The anxiety entailed by this disaster was grievous. Though a principal shareholder he had never had anything to do with the management of the Bank, or had he more knowledge of its financial condition previous to its stoppage than was made public. Nothing could then be done to avert the ruin and distress which its failure caused. For himself he humbly accepted the trial as a discipline and bore it with Christian fortitude. He often expressed his consolation at having brought up his family in a way which rendered it needless to make any great alteration in their manner or style of living. More than a year of suspense during the liquidation of the bank's affairs told upon his health. The sale of his house and other property during this time of commercial depression was a most trying ordeal, but after settling with the liquidators of the insolvent bank in the spring of 1859, he went with his son James to Westmoreland, on a visit for rest and charge of scene, and when walking on the road between Shap and Kendal, one very stormy day, be was seized with an attack of apoplexy which proved fatal. Carried into a lonely wayside inn, ‘The Plough," he passed away from earthly trouble, having just completed the sixtieth year of his age.

Steel (1899) pp. 140–2
1859-06-11 admon granted at Newcastle to son James, one of the residuary legatees; effects under £9000 National Probate Calendar


03. Isaac Richardson

1800-11-25 b. St John, Newcastle, Northumberland TNA: PRO RG 6/228, /404, /627
1810-07-06 of Newcastle; d. PRO RG 6/228, /777
1810-07-08 bur. Newcastle Friends' burial ground RG 6/228, /777


04. Margaret Richardson

1802-09-11 b. St John’s parish, Newcastle upon Tyne TNA: PRO RG 6/227, /404, /627
1810-01-16 of Newcastle; d. PRO RG 6/228, /777
1810-01-19 bur. Newcastle Friends' burial ground RG 6/228, /777


05. Rebecca Richardson

1804-04-05 b. St John’s parish, Newcastle upon Tyne TNA: PRO RG 6/404, /628
1805-04-15 of Newcastle; d. there PRO RG 6/228, /777
1805-04-17 bur. Newcastle upon Tyne fbg RG 6/228, /777


Edward Richardson 06. Edward Richardson


silhouette of Rebecca Richardson 07. Rebecca Richardson

1807-10-04 b. Newcastle PRO RG 6/404, /628
1828-12 had subscribed £1 1s. annually to the Newcastle Infant School Society Newcastle Courant, 1828-12-20
1834-08-19 of Spring Gardens, Newcastle upon Tyne; made will Durham Probate Records
1834-11-20 d. RG 6/228, /1151; 1836 Annual Monitor
1834-11-26 bur. plot 56, Friends' burial ground, Pilgrim Street, Newcastle RG 6/228, /1151; John William Steel (1899) A Historical Sketch of the Society of Friends 'in Scorn called Quakers' in Newcastle & Gateshead 1653-1898. London & Newcastle, Headley Bros., p. 220
 

. . . only lived to the age of 27. Two years before her death she writes: "Felt much anxiety of mind to-day, having to act as clerk to the Preparative Meeting when the four queries had to be answered. In thus endeavouring to lend a helping hand in the maintenance of the discipline of our Society, I do wish and even pray that my willingness to perform this little service may be blessed."

Her cousin Rachel Pumphrey (daughter of George Richardson), writes from Ackworth in 1838, to Ann Richardson in reference to Rebecca’s death—speaking of their stay at Cullercoats.—"How thoroughly I should have enjoyed accompanying Ellen and thee in your sea-side rambles. Ah! how this reminds me of days that are gone, when four of us joined in happy converse. One walk in particular seems so fresh in my recollection when our beloved departed one repeated Barbauld’s beautiful hymn on those sands. I think I was never more struck with its beauty. . . . Almost four years have flown past since she was taken. May it be our chief endeavour to let the day’s work keep pace with the day!"

Steel (1899), pp. 123-5


Ann (Richardson) Foster 08. Ann Richardson

1809-08-06 b. Spring Gardens, St John's parish, Newcastle TNA: PRO RG 6/404, /628, /629; Edward H. Milligan (2007) Biographical Dictionary of British Quakers in Commerce and Industry 1775-1920. York: Sessions Book Trust; information from Carol Clement; 1894 Annual Monitor
by 1833-01-26 had subscribed £1 1s. to the Newcastle Soup Kitchen Newcastle Journal, 1833-01-26
1837

Often accompanied her brother Edward on the journeys he took, by sea and land, for the benefit of his health. On one of these occasions they were shipwrecked. In 1837 they went to London by the Menai steamer to consult Sir James Clark, who recommended him to return home by a sailing vessel. Accordingly they embarked in a Newcastle trader, 'The Bywell,' making her first voyage. The weather was threatening, and the captain crowded on all sail; hoping to have light enough to run into Yarmouth Roads and shelter for the night. But the storm of wind and rain increased. Edward and Ann were alone about six o'clock in the cabin, fearing no danger, when suddenly there came an awful shock, quickly followed by another and another. The vessel had struck upon the Newcombe Sands off Pakefield, and all hope that the ship would get off was taken away, for the rudder was soon lost, and she seemed to be breaking up by the violence of the waves. The men prepared to launch the boats; the first was swamped in the attempt, and the long boat shared the same fate. They were three miles from shore. They were about three hours in this state of exposure and uncertainty, when the lifeboat from Lowestoft, with seventeen brave men, came to their rescue. Just a quarter of an hour afterwards the ship broke up. Edward lost everything except the clothes he wore. They reached the shore at about ten o'clock at night, where they received most kind attention from the Vicar of Lowestoft, Francis Cunningham, and his wife, one of the Gurneys of Earlham [Richenda, sister to Elizabeth Fry and Joseph John Gurney]. He took them to their house, and kindly sent them on to Norwich in their carriage to take coach for the North.

Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson; Ann R. Foster in Steel (1899): 157-8; Annual Monitor:1875
 

We discovered, in a tin in the games cupboard, an old bonnet & shawl & a pair of gloves. The bonnet bore a note that it belonged to Anne Richardson, later Anne Foster. She bought it in Lowestoft in 1837 after being shipwrecked and losing all her clothes. The gloves were returned to her after a fortnight in the sea, they were washed ashore at Lowestoft.

Sidney Beck's diary, entry for 1946-07-28, while on holiday with Ruth at Heugh Folds
1837-03 had subscribed £5 for the Distress in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland Newcastle Courant, 1837-03-24
1838-01 had subscribed £1 for the Soup Kitchen Newcastle Courant, 1838-01-19
1838-07 had subscribed £2 for the Royal Victoria Asylum for the Blind Newcastle Courant, 1838-07-13
1839-02 had subscribed £1 for the Soup Kitchen Newcastle Courant, 1839-02-08
1840-01-09 subscribed £1 1s. for the General Soup Kitchen Northern Liberator, 1840-01-18
1841 ind[ependent], of Summerhill Grove, Westgate, Newcastle upon Tyne, living with her mother and two female servants PRO HO 107/824/10 f21 p34
1841-11 had subscribed 10s. annually to the Newcastle Repository Newcastle Courant, 1841-11-05
1842-11-29 subscribed £1 1s. for the Soup Kitchen Newcastle Journal, 1842-12-03
by 1843-07-22 of Summerhill Grove; had become an annual subscriber of £1 to the Gateshead British Schools Newcastle Journal, 1843-07-22
1844-01-11 subscribed £2 for the Soup Kitchen Newcastle Journal, 1844-01-13
1844-12-13 subscribed £2 2s. for the Soup Kitchen Newcastle Journal, 1844-12-21
1846-12 had subscribed £2 for the Soup Kitchen Newcastle Courant, 1846-12-18
1847/1854 treasurer of the Newcastle Ragged School for Girls Ellen Richardson and Ann Richardson Foster. In Memoriam
1848-11-04 of 3 Summerhill Grove; treasurer of the Newcastle Ragged School for Girls Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury, 1848-11-04
1848-12 had subscribed £1 1s. for the Soup Kitchen Newcastle Courant, 1848-12-29
by 1848-12-02 had become annual subscriber of £2 to the Newcastle Ragged School for Girls Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury, 1848-12-02
1849 had subscribed £1 1s. for the Soup Kitchen Newcastle Courant, 1849-12-14
1850-01-03 present at a soirée to William Wells Brown, at the Music Hall in Newcastle Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury, 1850-01-05
1850
Paid for the tuition, at the North of England Agricultural School at Great Ayton, of William Lisle, the eldest teenage son of a pilot-fisherman of Cullercoats, who had drowned with seven of his family/colleagues in February of 1848. After two years at Ayton, his subsequent conduct was said to have been a great disappointment to Miss Richardson.
information from Kelvin Wilson, 2010
 

. . . they [she, her father, and her cousin Ellen] became warmly interested in the fishermen [of Cullercoats] and their families, making personal friendships with some, and winning the confidence of all. They soon found how great was the need for an infant school, so that the little ones might be cared for while their mothers were away in the neighbouring towns selling fish. A school-house was accordingly built, and the lowest age of admission was fixed at eighteen months. Toys and mattresses were provided, and this Crêche-school became almost a unique institution. It was not long before it developed, by natural growth, into a general elementary school for boys and girls. As the numbers increased the building was enlarged, and many of the inhabitants of to-day have grown up to thank "Miss Ellen" and "Miss Ann" and their coadjutors for there assiduous and watchful care.

1897 Annual Monitor
1850 with Henry and Anna Richardson, spent three weeks in Paris, distributing specially bound copies of the New Testament 1893 Annual Monitor; Steel (1899): 192
1851 living with a cook and a housemaid at 3 Summerhill Grove, Westgate, Newcastle-upon-Tyne HO 107/ 2404 f469 p56
1851-11-08 of 3 Summerhill Grove; treasurer of the Girls' Ragged School Newcastle Journal, 1851-11-08
1851-12 had subscribed £1 1s. for the Soup Kitchen Newcastle Courant, 1851-12-26
by 1852-11-27 had subscribed £5 for the workmen who lost their tools in the fire in Westgate Street Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury, 1852-11-27
1853-01-06 subscribed £5 to the Newcastle, Northumberland, and Durham Society for the Repression of Juvenile Crime, and the Reformation of Youthful Delinquents Newcastle Courant, 1853-01-07
1853-11 had subscribed £1 for the fund for dependents of cholera victims Newcastle Courant, 1853-11-18
1854-01 had subscribed £1 1s. for the Soup Kitchen Newcastle Courant, 1854-01-20
1854-04-29 took £136 19s. 2d. at her stall at the previous week's Ragged School bazaar Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury, 1854-04-29
by 1854-10-21 had subscribed £5 for the sufferers by fire Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury, 1854-10-21
1855-01-26 one of the ladies who presided at tables at the opening of the Newcastle ragged and industrial schools Newcastle Courant, 1855-01-26
1855-02 had subscribed £1 1s. for the Soup Kitchen Newcastle Courant, 1855-02-23
1856-01 had subscribed £1 1s. for the Soup Kitchen Newcastle Courant, 1856-01-18
1856-11 had subscribed £10 to the Infant School Society Newcastle Courant, 1856-11-07
1857-02-07 of Beech Grove; treasurer of the fund for the relief of distress in Cullercoats, to which she had subscribed £5 Newcastle Journal, 1857-02-07
1857 spring toured in the Pyrenees with brother Edward and niece Anna John Wigham Richardson, ed. (1877) Memoir of Anna Deborah Richardson, printed privately, p. 102
1858-03 had subscribed £1 1s. for the Soup Kitchen Newcastle Courant, 1858-03-05
1858-07-07 of Beech Grove, Elswick Lane, Newcastle; m. Robert Foster, at Newcastle-on-Tyne marriage digest; The Friend XV.188:153; Annual Monitor; Milligan (2007)
 

About 1858 she was married to Robert Foster, and henceforth both were united in much philanthropic work in the town, and in labours connected with Newcastle Meeting. The Ragged School owed much to their care, and many can remember the hours of pleasant social intercourse passed in their hospitable home.

Steel (1899): 70, 197
1861 living with husband (bank manager) and 3 house servants at 30 Rye Hill, Elswick, Newcastle on Tyne PRO RG 9/3815 f27 p6
1861/1879 secretary to the Ladies' Committee of the Ragged and Industrial School Ellen Richardson and Ann Richardson Foster. In Memoriam
1863-09-12 present with her husband at the Ragged School Children's Treat, in Newcastle Newcastle Courant, 1863-09-18
1863-12-14 of 30 Rye Hill Mosscroft visitors' book
1864-12-09 of 30 Rye Hill, Nc
1865-10-21 of 30 Rye Hill, NC
1868-01-30 of 30 Rye Hill, N'castle
1869-07-19 of Rye Hill, NC.
1871 of 31 Rye Hill, Elswick, Newcastle, living with husband and three servants RG 10/5075 f77 p6
1881 living with husband (retired bank manager), nephew, and three servants at The Quarries, Elswick RG 11/5055 f159 p17
1884-03-27 "Our dear Aunt Anne Foster was also absent through illness - a long continued & severe illness, from wh however to the joy of us all, she has, at length, completely recovered." Elizabeth Spence Watson's "Family Chronicles"
1887-09 . . . "dear Uncle Robert & Aunt Anne Foster, who are both well & take the same kind & active interest in the various branches of the family as ever." Elizabeth Spence Watson's "Family Chronicles"
1891 living with husband and three servants at The Quarries West, Clifton Rd, Elswick; blind of one eye RG 12/4199 f19 p31
1893-07

Watching our beloved Aunt Anne's life "Wearing awa, like snaw when its thaw." A paralytic stroke 3 months ago has made her helpless ever since. She has been such a large part of our daily life since we have lived side by side that our loss will be great indeed. She always took a keen and loving interest in our children.

Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1893-07-10 of the Quarries, West-Clifton-road, Newcastle-upon-Tyne; d. there The Friend XXXIII, 1893-08-11, The British Friend II Sept:268; National Probate Calendar
  bur. Elswick Cemetery Ellen Richardson and Ann Richardson Foster. In Memoriam
1893-07-10

Ann Foster, 83 10 7 mo. 1893
Newcastle-on-Tyne. An Elder. Wife of Robert Foster.

It has been thought that the memorials of the Annual Monitor would be incomplete without some record of one who was deeply attached to the Society of Friends, and who was much beloved and will be greatly missed by a wide circle. This brief tribute may recall her gentle presence to the minds of some, and her bright example may be to all a word of cheer.

Ann Foster was the daughter of Isaac and Deborah Richardson, and was born at Spring Gardens, Newcastle-on-Tyne, in 1809. Her father, a man of refinement and intellectual tastes, died when she was only ten months old, leaving his widow and young family to the guardianship of his brother, George Richardson whose paternal care over them was unremitting, and between whom and this almost adopted daughter a close and tender bond existed to the end of his long and venerated career. Her childhood was one of much indulgence, her health being delicate, and she was kept at home for education. Her only sister died in early womanhood, so that her lot was a secluded one, and passed in close companionship with her mother, to whom she was ever a devoted daughter.

In 1841 Deborah Richardson removed to Summerhill Grove, to be near her two sons, John and Edward, who had settled there, one with a bride from Plymouth, the other with one from Edinburgh. Though brought from places so far apart, they had both been carefully matured and trained in the same religious fellowship, and the families continued in close unity with the Society of Friends. When the first of these sisters-in-law came to Newcastle, Ann Richardson was a girl in her teens, but was already wearing the cap which, with a little alteration in style, was worn to old age, and which in some degree gave to her the same appearance from youth onwards.

From the time of their bridal days till death parted them, long years afterwards, an unbroken friendship existed between these three sisters ; and it was in the happy union and intimacy with the large families that sprang up in the houses of her two brothers that the foundation was laid of that relationship of "aunt " which clung to her through life, and by which she was known and beloved by succeeding generations.

Records of these early years, dating from 1824, tell of much intellectual activity amongst the young Friends of Newcastle, and of their diligent attendance at Monthly and Quarterly Meetings, going by steamboat and coach, and of journeys to London ; while the constant intercourse with Devonshire and Scotland, and long visits from distant relatives and friends, introduced an element of much interest and profit into these households. Many allusions are also made to the beauty and enjoyment of the fruitful gardens of their suburban residences, which have long been swallowed up or surrounded by the ever expanding city growth.

In looking back to this period one seems not only to span England, as it then was, but the century which has seen such changes in social and national life.

The death of Deborah Richardson took place in 1848, and was deeply felt. This loss did but deepen the tie which bound Ann Richardson to her brothers ; and as the years rolled on, with their alternating clouds and sunshine, she was to them a tender, loving sister, the constant sharer of their and their children's joys and sorrows.

She became stronger in health as she grew up, and her uncle George Richardson was very instrumental in the formation of her character. As this developed, the Christian graces of humility and love shone more and more conspicuously. The love of Christ within her brought forth its legitimate fruit of love to man, and in many ways she sought to promote the Redeemer's Kingdom on earth.

Being very dependent on fresh air, and delighting in the plentiful use of pure water, it was the family habit to go often to the country or sea-side, and hence she grew up familiar with both, especially with the sea and the hardy race of fishermen who inhabit the Northumbrian villages. Nor were the perils of the deep known to her only by hear-say. In 1837 she accompanied her brother Edward to London, and, for the benefit of his health, they were returning to the Tyne by sailing vessel. When off the coast of Suffolk the vessel ran upon the Newcome Sands, and all efforts to get her off proving fruitless, she became a total wreck. The water washed quite over the deck, and in the darkness of that fearful night they clung together, drenched to the skin, and expecting any moment might be their last. The Lowestoft life-boat, however, came off in response to a lighted tar barrel, and they were landed safely, but bare-headed and penniless. Their ship-wreck soon became known at Lowestoft. The clergyman, Francis Cunningham, treated them with great kindness, and a friend lent them money to enable them to go home by coach. The large Tuscan bonnet of the early Victorian period, purchased on that occasion, was kept as a memento, and brought out as often as the stirring tale was told to eager listeners in after years, but never without emotion and the acknowledgment of God's care, not only in preserving life, but also in that her brother's health did not materially suffer from such exposure.

The welfare, both spiritual and temporal, of sea-faring people engaged her earnest attention year after year. In conjunction with her cousin, Ellen Richardson, she established a school for children at Cullercoats; and through later life, when in residence at Newbiggin, a few miles further north, the needs of the poor were looked into and their condition often materially assisted. During her earlier years she also actively sympathised with the efforts made for the emancipation of the slaves.

A short account was given in the Annual Monitor last year of a visit to Paris, in 1846, by her cousins, Henry and Anna Richardson, for the purpose of distributing the New Testament in that city and its neighbourhood. A. Richardson's companionship and help on that occasion were truly valuable, and the enterprise was entered into and carried out with much zest.

Her labours on behalf of others did not consist in fitful efforts, but were mainly continuous, through years of patient endeavour, to establish and uphold what her judgment decided was for the best. Many charitable institutions received her warm support, the Ragged and Industrial School at Newcastle especially so from its very commencement. The teachers and matrons always found in her a kind and judicious adviser, and many can testify to the help she gave them into positions of much usefulness. She was liberal to the poor, seeking out the wretched and miserable in their dwellings, at personal self-sacrifice, with deep and true-hearted sympathy .

"While her heart was thus drawn out in care for others, she was always loyal to her own religious Society. She loved the principles of Friends, and sought in a gentle way to instil them. Friends travelling as Ministers were lodged and cared for, and companies of Monthly and Quarterly Meeting visitors were generously provided for during many j^ears. Being well qualified for the service, she filled the office of an Elder for a long period with much acceptance. She was able to speak the truth in love, and so to manifest her sympathy, whilst handing counsel, as to avoid giving offence. She was, indeed, a preacher of righteousness in life and conversation. Her light shone because it could not be hid; it was the illumination of the Divine Spirit within which made her what she was, and by this guiding light she sought to walk humbly with her God.

In 1858 Ann Richardson was united in marriage with Robert Foster. This step did not remove her from her native town, and by it another large circle was added to her own, and henceforth the house was more than ever an open one. The two were one in extending a double welcome, double kindness, and double help, if help was needed, to all who came. For thirty -five years this happy union of hand and heart continued, and by her death a deep sense of loss and sorrow fills the vacant place.

She was affectionately beloved by her nephews and nieces. Those of the second generation gathered round her as the first had done. She entered into their pursuits, her knowledge of Continental travel, and her acquaintance with modern educational requirements, enabling her to follow the accounts they brought from school and college, at home or abroad, though often with wonderment at the altered ways and the changed lines on which life runs since her own young days. She loved the little ones of the third generation, and her gifts to old and young alike were never failing.

As the threescore years and ten crept over her a failure of power was perceptible, though her activity continued great; and she still got out to Meeting, often twice a day; and she still took her accustomed interest in Society affairs and in all that concerned those dear to her. It was early in the spring of the present year, 1893, that decided signs of weakness appeared, and she was laid aside from further participation in outward things. Thus she continued for about three months, often speaking of the goodness of the Lord, and numbering her mercies; counting herself to be all unworthy, save through the redeeming love of Christ her Saviour. Very gently, day by day, her strength declined, till the end came and she peacefully departed— the end, it may be said, of an uneventful life, yet one of unobtrusive beneficence; and to her we must believe the glad words would be addressed :—" Thou hast been faithful over a few things, I will make thee ruler over many things; enter thou into the joy of thy Lord."
 

1894 Annual Monitor
 

Ann R. Foster was the daughter of Isaac and Deborah Richardson, and was born at Spring Gardens, in 1809. Her father, a man of refinement and intellectual tastes, died when she was only ten months old. Her childhood was one of much indulgence, her health being delicate, and she was kept at home for education. Her only sister died in early womanhood, so that her lot was a secluded one, and passed in close companionship with her mother, to whom she was ever a devoted daughter.

In 1841 Deborah Richardson removed to Summerhill Grove, to be near her two sons, John and Edward, who had settled there.

Records of those early years, dating from 1824, tell of much intellectual activity amongst the young friends of Newcastle, and of their diligent attendance at Monthly and Quarterly Meetings, going by steamboat and coach, and of journeys to London; while the constant intercourse with Devonshire and Scotland, introduced an element of much interest and profit into these households.

Her mother’s death in 1848 was deeply felt. This loss did but deepen the tie which bound her to her brothers; to whom she was a tender, loving sister, the constant sharer of their joys and sorrows.

As her character developed, the Christian graces of humility and love shone more and more conspicuously. The love of Christ within her brought forth its legitimate fruit of love to man, and in many ways she sought to promote the Redeemer’s Kingdom on earth.

Her help on the occasion of a visit to Paris in 1846, for the purpose of distributing New Testaments in that city was truly valuable, and the enterprise was carried out with zest.

Many charitable institutions received her warm support, the Ragged and Industrial School especially so, from its very commencement. She was liberal to the poor, seeking them out in their dwellings with deep and true-hearted sympathy.

While her heart was thus drawn out in care for others she was always loyal to her own religious society. She loved the principles of Friends, and sought in a gentle way to instil them. She filled the office of Elder for a long period with much acceptance. She was able to speak the truth in love, and so to manifest her sympathy whilst handling counsel as to avoid giving offence.

In 1858 she was united in marriage with Robert Foster. This did not remove her from her native town: and by it another large circle was added to her own. For thirty-five years this happy union of hand and heart continued.

She was affectionately beloved by her nephews and nieces. Those of the second generation gathered round her as the first had done. She entered into their pursuits with interest; her knowledge of Continental travel, and her acquaintance with modern educational requirements, enabling her to follow the accounts they brought from school and college, at home or abroad.

As the three-score years and ten crept over her a failure of power was perceptible, though her activity continued great.

Early in the spring of 1893 decided signs of weakness appeared, and very gently, day by day, her strength declined till the end came; the end, it may be said, of an uneventful life, yet one of unobtrusive beneficence.

Steel (1899), pp. 195-8
1892-12-05 will proved at London by Robert Foster, David Richardson, John Wigham Richardson, Robert Spence Watson and John Theodore Merz; effects £19,172 14s. 7d. National Probate Calendar


Richardson page | Sutton page | Family history home page | Website home page

 

This page was last revised on 2016-01-19.

 

© 2010–2016 Benjamin S. Beck

joomla site stats