Children of John and Ellen Binns

01. John George Binns

1850-01-30 b. Haslingden, Lancashire TNA: HO 107/2250 f122 p38; GRO index; David Binns gedcom
1851 living with his parents and a house servant at Albert Street, Haslingden, Lancashire HO 107/2250 f122 p33
1861 of Regent St, Haslingden, living with his family TNA: RG 9/3060 f123 p31
1867-06-21 obtained the Second Certificate of the Laboratory Junior Class (Lower Division) Technology, of Owens College, Manchester Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser, 1867-06-22
1871 smallwares putter out, lodger with family of Richard Hamer at 136 Ridgway St, Manchester RG 10/4035 f161 p32
1872-01-12 d. Haslingden RD information from John Dunleavy, 2010; GRO index
  bur. Haslingden, Congregational burial ground source misplaced


02. Hannah Binns

1852-05-01 b. Haslingden, Lancashire censuses; GRO index; parish register
1852-08-08 bapt. Haslingden parish register
1861 scholar, of Regent St, Haslingden, living with her family TNA: RG 9/3060 f123 p31
1871 of Regent St, Haslingden, living with her family RG 10/4140 f122 p4
1881 not found in census  
1891 living with widowed mother and a general servant at 3 Carr House Lane, Lancaster RG 12/3467 f31 p55
1901 living with her family and a servant at 27 Regent St, Haslingden, Lancashire RG 13/3990 f9 p9
1903-04-01 gave evidence at her brother's inquest (see below) Durham County Advertiser, 1903-04-03
1911 private means, living with her family and a general servant at 94 Aldcliffe Road, Lancaster, Lancashire; 8 rooms RG14PN25538 RG78PN1461 RD479 SD3 ED14 SN154
1913-12-16 co-executor of her mother's will National Probate Calendar
1914-10-01 administrator of the estate of her brother Herbert Binns
1929-06-26 of 5 Belle Vue-terrace, Lancaster; d. Harrogate National Probate Calendar; GRO index
1929-08-09 administration granted at Lancaster to Lucy Crozier; effects £2304 16s. 9d. National Probate Calendar
1937-06-18 administration granted at Lancaster to William Leslie Crozier; effects £938 17s. 6d.


03. Margaret Binns

1854-04-20 b. Haslingden, Lancashire censuses; GRO index; Brian Davey: Thistlethwaite CD; David Binns gedcom
1861 scholar, of Regent St, Haslingden, living with her family TNA: RG 9/3060 f123 p31
1871 of Regent St, Haslingden, living with her family RG 10/4140 f122 p4
1881 not found in census  
1891 visitor with Thomas Jones and family at 6 Queen Street, North Bailey, Durham RG 12/4103 f8 p9
1901 living with her family and a servant at 27 Regent St, Haslingden, Lancashire RG 13/3990 f9 p9
1911 private means, living with her family and a general servant at 94 Aldcliffe Road, Lancaster, Lancashire; 8 rooms RG14PN25538 RG78PN1461 RD479 SD3 ED14 SN154
1913-12-16 co-executor of her mother's will National Probate Calendar
1929-10-29 of 5 Belle Vue-terrace, Lancaster; d. Lancaster RD National Probate Calendar; GRO index
1930-02-15 administration granted at Lancaster to William Leslie Crozier; effects £3906 National Probate Calendar


04. Herbert Binns

1857-08-21 b. Haslingden, Lancashire Brian Davey: Thistlethwaite CD; David Binns gedcom; GRO index
1861 of Regent St, Haslingden, living with his family TNA: RG 9/3060 f123 p31
1871 scholar, pupil at Spring Bank School, Over Darwen, Lancashire RG 10/4188 f44 p28
1881 not found in census  
1891
1901 living with his family and a servant at 27 Regent St, Haslingden, Lancashire RG 13/3990 f9 p9
1903-03-31 of 27 Regent-street, Lancaster; d. Durham National Probate Calendar; GRO index
1903-03-31

SUPPOSED SUICIDE AT DURHAM.

A melancholy affair is reported from Durham, where the dead body of a man in the prime of life was found this morning, with a bottle of poison lying near, in a field near the Pot and Glass Inn, and close the disused Mosley Banks Paper Mills, a mile or so outside the city. The body was identified as that of Herbert Binns, who was about 45 years of age. Thirty years or more ago these paper mills belonged to the deceased's mother, who occupied a good position in the city, and had a big trade at the mills. Change in the conditions of trade led to the disuse of the mills, and the family left Durham. The deceased, who in those days was very well known in the city, had been away from his native place for many years, and was well night forgotten when the distressing news spread that he had returned to come to a pitiful end where his youth was spent. The body was well dressed when found, and the label of a chemist in Lancashire was affixed to the bottle.

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1903-03-31
1903-04-01

MELANCHOLY SUICIDE AT DURHAM.

POISONED BY PRUSSIC ACID.

At the County Hospital, Durham, this morning, Mr Coroner Graham held an inquest on the body of Herbert Binns (46), of no occupation, of Regent Street, Lancaster, who was found dead in a field near the Pot and Glass Inn, Durham, yesterday morning.

Miss Binns, the sister of the deceased, said that many years ago her father carried on the Morsley Bank Paper Mill, near Durham. Her brother worked there as a youth, but for many years the family had lived in Lancaster. In 1891 the deceased returned from Africa, and since then he had been living with his mother, at Regent Street, Lancaster. He had not followed any occupation recently. He had lost money on horses, and had been in trouble lately and very much depressed. He left the house about eleven o'clock on Monday, saying that he was going to the other side of the town and would soon return. Before going he got a sovereign from his mother. That was the last time they saw him alive.

William Tarren, labourer, of Neville's Cross, gave evidence as the the finding of the body of the deceased in the Mill Field at Moorsley Banks. There was a small blue bottle beside the deceased labelled "Prussic Acid. R.S. Angus, chemist, Lancaster."

P.C. Cummings presented a report, from which it appeared that deceased bought sixpennyworth of prussic acid from the Lancaster chemist on Monday, saying that he wanted to poison a dog with it.

A verdict that deceased committed suicide whilst in an unsound state of mind was returned.

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1903-04-01

SUICIDE'S SENTIMENTAL JOURNEY.

FORMER DURHAM MAN RETURNS TO DIE

Mr Graham, the Coroner for the Chester Ward, held an inquest at the Durham County Hospital on Wednesday morning on the body of Herbert Binns, who was found dead lying in a field at Moseley Banks, having apparently committed suicide by taking prussic acid.

The deceased was very well-known in Durham, where he lived with his parents some years back, on Western Hill, during the time that his mother had the Moseley Banks Paper Mills, and some of the jurymen intimated to the Coroner that they had known him very well, and recognised the face again.

The Coroner said that removed all question of identity, even if there had been any, which there was not.

Mr William Dodd having been chosen foreman, and the jury sworn in, evidence of identification was given by

Miss Hannah Binns, sister, who stated that the deceased had lived with his mother and witness at 27, Regent Street, Lancaster. Her brother was 46 years of age, and had no occupation. During the time they had the paper mills at Moseley Banks, near Durham, and lived on Western Hill, the deceased worked there a little, but he had learned no occupation, and since coming back from South Africa in 1891 he had lived with his mother.

Questioned as to whether her brother had been in the army, Miss Binns said he had not been in any regular army, nor had he been in any yeomanry. On Monday morning he left home at eleven o'clock, stating that he was going to the other side of the town, and would be back in a very short time. His mother had given him a sovereign before he left the house. Witness knew that her brother sometimes went to the shop of Mr Angus, a chemist at Stonewell, Lancaster. He did not own a dog, nor did he mention the fact to them that he was going to poison anybody's dog.

The Coroner: Do you know if there is any reason for your brother poisoning himself?—No.

Has he been in any trouble? It is sufficient for you to say if he has or not without saying what it is?—He has been in trouble.

Lately?—Yes.

Did that have any effect upon him? Was he in a low, melancholy state of mind?—Yes, very much depressed, last week.

P.C. Cummings produced papers found on the body, and witness on being asked if some pencil marks on an envelope were his writing, said they were.

Was he a betting man?—Yes, he did bet.

I see some names of horses. Has he been losing on the turf?—He had been betting.

Was he betting on the Liverpool Grand National?—Yes, I think so.

And lost?—I don't know.

The Coroner, after looking at the names of the horses written on the envelope, said he should say they had nothing to do with the Liverpool Grand National. He was not a betting man, but one could not help seeing these things at times, and he did not think there was a Liverpool horse there.

Turning to the jury he said, "You can see them. Don't admit it if you don't like to," and to a reporter sitting at his right hand Coroner Graham remarked, "You are a sporting man," to which the individual addressed replied "I like to read them."

"Then you are troubled with my complaint and nothing more."

The envelope bearing the names of the horses written in pencil by deceased was laid on the table. It was evidently for races some time back, the names including those of First Principal, Jolly Tar, Electric Current, &c.

The Coroner said that if Binns had not been a regular soldier he had at any rate done some fighting as an auxiliary, and he had a very good character.

The character was as follows:—

THE AFRICAN LAKES COMPANY, LIMITED.

Mandala, E. Central Africa,

17 January, 1889

Mr Herbert Binns has been working and fighting against the Arabs in the service of my company at Karmgas, on Lake Nyassa, from June till December last, and has been perfectly steady and trustworthy during that time. I have to say it is with great regret that I see him leave, for he has proved himself a good worker and a brave fighter. Most heartily do I wish him success in the future.

JOHN W. MOIR."

Wm. Tarren, labourer, living at Neville's Cross, deposed that he found the body at a quarter to seven on Tuesday morning, lying in a field at the Moseley Paper Mills. An empty bottle labelled poison, and bearing a Lancaster chemist's name, lay beside him.

Dr. Pattullo, house surgeon at the Hospital, said there was no smell remaining in the bottle produced when he saw it on Wednesday night. Witness had no doubt the man died from the effects of prussic acid. There were no marks of violence on the body.

P.C. Cummings, the Western Hill district constable, deposed that at 7.45 a.m., he saw the dead body. By the side lay the small blue bottle now produced, labelled "Prussic Acid. Poison, R.S. Angus, Stonewell, Lancaster." Witness searched the clothing, and found 1s 11½d in the trousers pockets, and in the coat pocket he found a card case, containing some sporting papers. In the overcoat pocket witness found a dog chain, pipe, knife, and tobacco. There was also a letter addressed to Mr Herbert Binns, 27, Regent Street, Lancaster, which led to his identification. The deceased was lying stretched out full length on his back, with his hands clenched, and there seemed to have been very little struggling. Witness communicated with the Lancaster police, and had received the following report:

With reference to the telegram from Durham re Herbert Binns having died from the effects of supposed poison, and having a bottle labelled prussic acid, I beg to state I have seen Mr Angus, and he states that Binns came to his shop about noon yesterday. He appeared to be all right in his mind. He had a dog chain in his hands, and stated that he wanted some prussic acid to poison a large dog, but he replied that he wanted to preserve the skin. Mr Angus knew Binns, but to make quite sure he told him to bring a witness. Binns went out, and returned with a man named Albert Booth, fent dealer, Stonewell. Mr Angus then sold Binns sixpenny worth of prussic acid. Binns signed his name to the poison register, giving his correct name and address."

Having got such a very clear report from the police, said the Coroner, he did not think it was worth while to adjourn the inquiry and bring the police here.

Mr W.T. Bowden thought they had not a very clear case from the doctor. There were no symptoms of poisoning.

The Coroner said it was more negative, showing the absence of any marks of violence. To go thoroughly into the matter would require the man to be opened and the contents of the stomach analysed, and so on. He did not think it at all advisable in the circumstances. Death would be instantaneous if a man took it. It was a most deadly poison. If there had been any suggestion that anything was wrong about the case he would have adjourned it, but it did not occur to him as being necessary in this case. There was plenty of evidence to show the man was in possession of prussic acid, and that he must have taken it.

The Coroner proceeded to observe that the deceased had schemed throughout. He (the Coroner) had asked Miss Binns if her brother had had a dog, and she said he had not. But he had possessed himself of a dog chain, evidently to deceive the chemist, and it was a very well thought out and clever scheme to deceive a careful chemist.

Miss Binns: He had a friend who had a dog.

The Coroner said no doubt the deceased could get a dog chain from anybody. It was a strong chain, so as to give the idea that he had a powerful dog, and would require a good dose of poison to kill it. Nothing could be more clever than that to deceive the chemist, and get possession of the poison that otherwise would not have been sold to him. The chemist was not to blame in the slightest, because he was exceedingly careful. Deceased brought a witness and signed the poison book, and being known to the chemist the latter, no doubt, thought the story to be true.

Miss Binns asked if she could say something as to the state of mind her brother was in.

The Coroner said he did not think it was necessary. The jury would feel satisfied that he was not in his right mind.

Miss Binns said if they had seen him she did not think any of them could have thought him in his right mind.

The Coroner, in summing up, said there was a pathetic incident in this case, that Binns should have come back close to the old place where he worked in his younger and happier days, to die. He probably would not wish to commit the act near to Lancaster, where his mother probably would be horrified by his body being taken in home at once. There was that pathetic incident, that he travelled all that distance from Lancaster down to Moseley Banks, and in sight of the old mill there, should take his life. The Coroner added that he could not help feeling great regret that after having earned such a character in South Africa the deceased should not have done better. He seemed to have done no good after the end of that engagement, and if what they heard was correct, and he had taken to betting, they knew from sad experience what sad results follow from that.

Mr Gott: That has been the cause of it.

The Coroner: That no doubt has been the cause of it.

The jury returned a verdict that Herbert Binns committed suicide whilst in an unsound state of mind.

DECEASED'S ANTECEDENTS.

Coroner Graham said it was a matter of great regret to him to have to hold an inquest in this case, because although he did not know the deceased, he had a very high respect for his father, a gentleman he knew perfectly well years ago. In fact, to go back as far as his (the Coroner's) election the deceased's father took a considerable interest in that, and that was as long ago as 1873.

EPIDEMIC OF SUICIDES.

Coroner Graham remarked incidentally at the conclusion of the above inquest, that this was the first of five to be held by him that day, and three of them were cases of suicide.

Durham County Advertiser, 1903-04-03
1914-10-01 administration granted at Lancaster to sister Hannah Binns; effects £424 14s. 6d. National Probate Calendar


05. Lucy Binns

1867 Q1 b. Haslingden, Lancashire TNA: RG 10/4140 f122 p4; GRO index
1871 of Regent St, Haslingden, living with her family RG 10/4140 f122 p4
1881 not found in census  
1891 visitor with Thomas Jones and family at 6 Queen Street, North Bailey, Durham RG 12/4103 f8 p9
1901 not found in census  
1911
1933 Q2 d. Burnley RD GRO index


Children of George and Margaret Binns | Binns page | Family history home page | Website home page

 

This page was last revised on 2022-01-11.

 

© 2010–2022 Benjamin S. Beck

Web Analytics Made Easy - Statcounter