Children of William Hugh and Elizabeth Jane Jarvis

01. Hugh Alfred Jarvis

1873-08-12 b. Skinner's Cottages, Chatham Hill, Gillingham, Kent birth certificate; bishop's transcript; censuses
1875-06-24 bapt. Upwell St Peter, Norfolk bishop's transcript
1881 scholar, of 2 Middle Street, Gillingham, living with his family and sister-in-law TNA: RG 11/896 f67 p28
1891 assistant baker, employed, living with his family and aunt at 33 Old Kent Road, St George the Martyr, Southwark RG 12/344 f183 p4
1892 baker, of High Road, Leytonstone Old Bailey online
1899-08-07 baker, of 14 Broad St, Teddington; m. Eleanor Crabb (1874–1959, of 49 Hollydale Rd, d. of William Crabb, tailor, and his wife Charlotte), at St Mary Magdelene's, Peckham, London, after banns; Eleanor, aged 7, had been his next-door neighbour in 1881 GRO index; censuses; wife's death certificate; parish register; marriage certificate
Children: Eleanor May (1900 – after 1927, b. Teddington, Middlesex) and Hugh F. (1907 – after 1959, b. Canada) GRO index; daughter's birth certificate; RG 13/673 f25 p41; 1911 Census of Canada; wife's death certificate; daughter's marriage certificate
1901 baker (shopkeeper), employer, at home, living with his wife, daughter, and sister, at 14 Broad St, Teddington, Middlesex RG 13/673 f25 p41
1904 immigrated to Canada, with his family 1911 Census of Canada
1906 living with his wife and daughter in Bartlett St, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada 1906 Canada Census of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta
1911 living with his wife and two children at 375 Prud Homer, Jacques-Cartier, Quebec, Canada; employed 60 hours a week as "stuart" on the railroad, for which he had earned $1200 in 1910; held $1000 insurance, at a premium of £30 in 1911; Anglican 1911 Census of Canada
1928-08-21 of #135 Rodney St, West St John, N.B. US/Canadian border crossings
c. 1936 of St John, New Brunswick, Canada information from Andrew Jarvis, 2009
1939 retired, after 38 years at his occupation death certificate
1945 retired; living with his wife at 135 Rodney Street, West, St John-Albert, New Brunswick voters list
c. 1947 moved to Grand Bay, Kings County, New Brunswick death certificate
1952-12-02 dining car agent, C.P.R, of Grand Bay; d. at St John General Hospital, of hypertensive heart disease death certificate; Brenan's Funeral Home
1952-12-05 bur. Cedar Hill Cemetery


Albert Jarvis02. Albert Jarvis

1876-05-22 b. Docking, Norfolk censuses; Harold Jarvis (1980) 'From Whence We Came. The Life Story of Albert Jarvis (1877-1966)'—file on Jarvisdescendants Yahoo group; Ancestry; Ontario, Canada, Marriages; UK, Incoming Passenger Lists, gives date as 1877-05-21
1876-06-11 of Upwell St Peter, Norfolk; bapt. there parish register
1881 scholar, of 2 Middle Street, Gillingham, living with his family and sister-in-law TNA: RG 11/896 f67 p28
1888 enrolled in the Rochester Cathedral Choir School, Rochester, East Kent; enjoyed and profited immensely by his association with the other school pupils, masters and singing master. Rochester Cathedral was a source of many fond memories for Albert, and he was very proud of his association with this venerable Cathedral.

spent four years at Rochester and obtained an excellent grounding in music. All through his life music was to be one of, if not his favourite hobby. His training at Rochester proved invaluable in later years because of the sight reading and his choir work there.

Jarvis (1980)
1891 scholar, living with his family and aunt at 33 Old Kent Road, St George the Martyr, Southwark RG 12//344 f183 p4
  put to work in the bakery as soon as possible

apprenticed as a baker

Jarvis (1980)
1897 applied for a position with the P. & O. Steamship Lines
1897-06-04 appointed baker's mate and told to report the next day to the Royal Albert Dock, London East, where he would find the steward-in-charge. At the age of 19, Albert was off on a great adventure which was to last 10 years of round the world travel with the P. & O. boats, and he loved to talk about his travels to Africa, Australia, New Zealand, India and the Far East. His work with P. & O. must have been excellent, because he received a number of promotions.
1901 baker bread and confect[ioner]y, worker, living with his family and a servant at 1 St James Bldgs, High Rd, Leyton, Essex RG 13/1617 f44 p26
1904-07-16 arrived Quebec aboard the Parisian Border Crossings
1904-11-19 crossed from Canada to US at Niagara Falls, via. Allan Line SS. Co.; baker; last residence Twickenham / Orangeville Ont.; destination New York; in possession of $40; never visited US before Border Crossings and Border Crossings
1907 arrived in Canada to start a new phase Jarvis (1980)
  tried to find work in Toronto, but the "Chirpers" (English) were not too popular as there had been a big influx of them into Toronto and the locals felt they were competition for jobs, of which there weren't too many.

Albert then answered an ad for a farm hand. Although he did not have any experience, he landed a job with Oliver Sproule and his family, in the Orangeville district. He was welcomed into the family, and they became life long friends.

  after three years, got itchy feet to go out for himself. Before he took the big plunge, he went to work for Albert Jones Bakery in Caledonia for about a year. He then went to Stoney Creek where he started a small bakery. He worked very hard and built it up to a point where he could sell it and then moved to Hunter Street, Hamilton.
1915-02-13 baker, of Hamilton, Ontario; m. Annie Runciman (1889–1951, of Manchester, d. of William Runciman), at St Peter's church, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; Anglican GRO index; Jarvis (1980); Lynda Rooke gedcoms, 2008 & 2009; marriage certificate on Jarvisdescendants Yahoo group; Ontario, Canada, Marriages
  Annie worked at Meakins Ltd, a Hamilton manufacturer of brushes Jarvis (1980)
Children: Albert (1916–1975), (William Hugh) Harold (1918–2007), Irene (1919–2013), Norma (1921–1997), Lloyd (1923 – after 2019), Gloria (1930–2015) US cemetery and funeral home collection; Lynda Rooke gedcoms, 2008 & 2009
1915/1917 while the couple lived at 241 Hunter Street business was slowly but surely building up Jarvis (1980)
  bought a very large McLaughlin Buick from Rocco Perri, bootlegger and rum-runner
1917 built the Hunter Street business up and sold to Canada Bread, then opened up a bakery on Wilson Street. For the next four years Albert and Annie worked their heads off in the bakery.
1921-01 sold his business to a Jewish family headed up by Max Ellenzwieg, who became very successful as bakers of hearth baked bread
1921 living with his wife and four children at 367 Wilson St, Hamilton East, Ontario; baker, own account (bread) 1921 Census of Canada
1921-11 Albert, on the sale of Wilson Street, had so much money that he even thought he might retire, and he bought a home on Maple Avenue with about three-quarters of an acre of strawberries. After eleven months of puttering around, the urge to get back into the baking business became so strong that in November 1921, after checking out many small town bakeries, he made the big plunge and bought the bakery in Grimsby.

The bakery was located at 11 Depot Street (later Ontario Street) in a run-down dilapidated two-storey brick building. It had very rough wood floors, one brick oven (with the fire right in the oven), an old three bag bread mixer, and old divider and an old panner. On the property was a large two-storey frame barn and a four-bedroom storey-and-a-half house, in front of which was a stockroom where certain baking supplies such as chocolate, nuts, raisins, etc. were kept. The house needed a lot of work done on it to make it half liveable, and must have been rather difficult after the nice home on Maple Avenue.

Jarvis (1980)
  When Albert took over the Grimsby business there were four bread routes and some retail selling from the shop. Albert opened a store on the Main Street and expanded this into an ice cream parlour and then a candy department as well.
  The first few years were years of 80-plus hour weeks, but the business prospered for a number of reasons, namely much effort and personal sacrifice, quality products, modern methods of production, good sales training in the store and delivery vans, good public relations in the community, and being innovative. The effort was provided by both Albert and Annie. Albert insisted on quality ingredients and workmanship. Having an inquiring mind, he insisted on knowing not just baking, but the chemistry of baking, and was always attending test kitchens along with some of his staff to study new methods and products. He insisted that his staff be courteous, reasonably knowledgeable and neat. The Jarvis family supported the community both financially and with their presence. Albert was definitely innovative, producing and patenting a gluten loaf for diabetics, making whole wheat bread from grain ground in his own bakery (a super hit), having the first soft ice cream machine in the Peninsula, bringing it in from Chicago at a cost of $10,000, putting in high speed machinery for bread making, using tons of fresh produce such as potatoes, peaches, raspberries, strawberries, blueberries, apples, as baking ingredients, instead of the usual canned produce. advert for Jarvis bakery Jarvis (1980); image from Andrew Jarvis
  Another area Albert showed his aptitude for business in was sales. Decorum of staff was important, but he also kept his delivery equipment up-to-date and clean, and for the first few years in Grimsby, as he expanded his delivery service, he had up to 20 horses available. This included a number of teams used in country delivery, and they were used every other day in order to rest them. Albert liked and knew good horses and they were a pretty sight in front of the familiar yellow and black delivery wagons. The horses were eventually replaced by Model T trucks and one McLaughlin Buick, and a full time mechanic was eventually hired to keep these delivery vans on the road.

Deliveries for the first 15 years were confined to a radius of ten miles of the bakery, but eventually two trucks delivered in Hamilton. Two more stores were opened, one on Ottawa Street in Hamilton, and one in the village of Vineland.

Jarvis (1980)
  Somehow Albert found time to feed his love of music by rejoining his two favourite choirs—the Elgar and Centenary United, both conducted by his good friend Dr Howlett, and he remained associated with these choirs as chorister and tenor soloist for a number of years. Eventually he became a member of the newly formed Trinity United Church choir and was a valued member of the choir for many years. Although Albert and Annie were Anglicans when they arrived in Grimsby, they lived next door to the Methodist parsonage and church and, because of the convenience, they sent their children to the Methodist Sunday School and felt duty bound to support that church in return. Eventually when the Methodist Church joined with the Presbyterian and Congregationalists to form the United Church of Canada, the family joined Trinity United, although Albert left eventually to become a valued lay reader in St Andrew's Anglican Church in Grimsby.
  Albert was also a staunch Freemason, being a member and past member of No. 7 Union Grimsby, continuing his affiliation with Strict Observance Lodge in Hamilton, and being a member of the Scottish Rite Consistory, as 32 degree mason. He was honoured by being appointed district-deputy grand master of the area and his speeches were very well received. He was much interested in the music of the lodge and his influence in this respect showed.
  After church union, their home was the former Methodist Church Parsonage, a handsome five-bedroom two-storey gabled centre hall plan house on a large lot. Beside the house were some fruit trees and two tennis courts, which Albert eventually converted into a very large vegetable garden.
  After the collapse of his sister and brother-in-law's fuel business, their creditors prevailed on Albert to take it over. He did so, appointing a manager and running the business for three years, changing the name to the Jarvis Coal Company. All the creditors, except Albert himself, were paid off during this time. Eventually, with fuel oil taking over, Albert decided to put all his energies into the bakery.
  was a frustrated inventor, always thinking up something he was going to patent or introduce to the world
c. 1936 of Grimsby, Ontario, Canada information from Andrew Jarvis, 2009
  In the post-war period Albert increased his activities in Masonic work, visited England a couple of times, including a reunion for the Rochester Cathedral Old Boys, worked as a volunteer for the Bible Society, did a lot of gardening, went through an operation to correct circulation in his legs after two or three doctors said they would have to amputate, grew terrific raspberries which his grandchildren ate by the basket, and generally seemed to enjoy good health and life. Jarvis (1980)
 

"5'3 of vitality, humour, ego, concern for others, strong religious feelings" . . .

1944-04-21 crossed into US at Niagara Falls Border Crossings
1949 living with his wife and two of their children at 13 Depot, Lincoln, Ontario voters list
of Grimsby, Ontario; District Grand Superintendent for Niagara District, No. 7—gave a report on the condition of Royal Arch Masonry in the district Proceedings of Grand Chapter Royal Arch Masons of Canada, Ninety-First Annual Convocation
1955-08-11 arrived Liverpool from Montreal, aboard Cunard RMS Ivernia; address in UK 65 Bibby Rd, Southport; retired; intending to stay 4 months in UK UK, Incoming Passenger Lists
1956-08-24 arrived Liverpool from Montreal, aboard Cunard RMS Carinthia; address in UK 14 Wellington St, Chatham, Kent; retired; intending to say 11 weeks in UK UK, Incoming Passenger Lists
1957 retired, living with his son Lloyd and daughter Gloria at 11 Depot St, Lincoln voters list
1957-08-30 arrived Liverpool from Montreal, aboard Cunard RMS Carinthia; address in UK 14 Wellington St, Chatham, Kent; retired; intending to say 5 months in UK UK, Incoming Passenger Lists
1958 retired, living with his son Lloyd at 13 Depot St, Lincoln voters list
1966-03-03 when driving to Hamilton for a lodge meeting, was killed instantly when his car crashed into a pole, near the Innsville Hotel, Winona, Ontario, Canada; died the same day as his brother Will Jarvis (1980)
1966-03-07 very large funeral held at old St Andrew's Church; bur. beside his wife at Queen's Lawn Cemetery, Grimsby, Ontario, Canada The Ottawa Journal, 1966-03-07; Jarvis (1980)


03. William Henry Jarvis (Will, Willie)

1880-12-01 b. 2 Middle Street, Chatham, Kent birth certificate; WWI CEF personnel files; censuses
1881 of 2 Middle Street, Gillingham, living with family and sister-in-law TNA: RG 11/896 f67 p28
1891 scholar, living his with family and aunt at 33 Old Kent Road, St George the Martyr, Southwark RG 12//344 f183 p4
1901 not found in census  
1904 Q3 m. Amy Mary E. Newland (1879–1950), Camberwell RD GRO index; RG14PN2524 RG78PN85 RD27 SD4 ED5 SN163; 1921 Census of Canada; Find a Grave
Children: Gwendoline Emily (1905–1946), Ruby (1909 – after 1986), Clifford Henry (1913 – after 1921) RG14PN2524 RG78PN85 RD27 SD4 ED5 SN163; GRO index; 1921 Census of Canada
1911 tripe dresser, shop assistant, worker, of 46 Peckham Grove, Peckham, Camberwell, London; 4 rooms RG14PN2524 RG78PN85 RD27 SD4 ED5 SN163
1913-06-23 with his family, arrived in Quebec from Liverpool, aboard the Tunisian, bound for Hamilton, Ontario; shop assistant, nonconformist; travelled inland on C.P.R. Canadian Passenger Lists
1913 emigrated to Canada 1921 Census of Canada
1913-11-14 baker, of 81 Frances St, Hamilton, Wentworth, Ontario Canada births
1916-02-05 baker, of 81 Francis St, Hamilton, Ontario; had served 4 months in the 13th Royal Regt, Hamilton, Ontario; enlisted at Niagara Camp Unit as Private 757788 in Canadian Over-Seas Expeditionary Force; 5 ft 3 in, chest girth 36¾ in with 3¾ in expansion, dark complexion, blue eyes, brown hair; Church of England; 3 vaccination marks on left; small varicose vein behind left knee WWI CEF attestation papers; WWI CEF personnel files
1916-04/1917-12 wife paid $20 per month separation allowance WWI CEF personnel files
1916-07-11 admitted to hospital, and operated on for varicose veins the next day; good result
1916-08-09 discharged from hospital
1916-09-06 is insured with Prudential
1916-10-17 paid from 1916-02-05 to October 1916; had had 2 days leave; [apparently July 1916] transferred to Casualties for two days in August; unit sailed on 1916-10-17, first part per SS Matagama, second part per SS Corsican
1916-10-28 disembarked England
1916-12-31 transferred to 116 Bn, Bramshott, and taken on strength at Witley
1917-02-11 of 131 Birge St, Hamilton; with 116th Bn CAN [illegible word], proceeded on service overseas, with 116th Overseas Battalion C.E.F.; arrived Boulogne
1917-12-09/-23 on 1st army cookery course
1917-12-30/1918-01-13 on leave
1918-03-16 awarded 1 Good Conduct badge
1918-11-23/-12-14 on leave to UK
1919-01-17 dental certificate issued
1919-02-12 proceeded to England
1919-02-27 weight 135 lb; medical examination found defective vision: congenital compound myopic astigmatism, from childhood; "Has always had poor eyesight. Has worn glasses since about a year before enlistment"; "Seen by specialist at Witley who rec'd operation on tear duct but went to France soon and has had no further treatment"
1919-03-17 proceeded to Canada
1919-03-28 discharged at Hamilton; "four scars of operation for varicose veins left leg"; proposed residence after discharge 131 Birge St, Hamilton
1921 driver (baker), living with two daughters and a son at 131 Birge St, Hamilton East, Ontario, Canada; Church of England 1921 Census of Canada
c. 1936 of Montreal, Quebec, Canada information from Andrew Jarvis, 2009
1966-03-03 d. Queen Mary Veterans Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, of a stroke—the same day as his brother Albert WWI CEF personnel files; Harold Jarvis (1980) 'From Whence We Came. The Life Story of Albert Jarvis (1877-1966)'—file on Jarvisdescendants Yahoo group


04. Elizabeth Emily Jarvis (Lizzie)

1883-03-28T05:00 b. 12 Middle Street, Brompton, Kent birth certificate; censuses
1891 scholar, living with her family and aunt at 33 Old Kent Road, St George the Martyr, Southwark TNA: RG 12//344 f183 p4
1901 shop assistant (baker), worker, living with her brother's family at 14 Broad St, Teddington, Middlesex RG 13/673 f25 p41
1905-12-25 as Elizabeth Emma Jarvis, m. William Clark (cal 1885 – ?), at Brentford GRO index; Ontario births; 1921 Census of Canada
1907 emigrated to Canada 1921 Census of Canada
Children: Hugh (1910–1996), Charles Henry (cal 1916 – ?) Lynda Rooke gedcoms, 2008 & 2009; 1921 Census of Canada; Canada, GenWeb Cemetery Index
1921 living with her husband, two sons, and mother, at 41 Francis St, Hamilton East, Ontario 1921 Census of Canada
c. 1936 of Hamilton, Ontario, Canada information from Andrew Jarvis, 2009


05. (Rosetta) Maud Jarvis

1887-10-07 b. 12 Middle Street, Brompton, Kent birth certificate; censuses
1891 scholar, living with her family and aunt at 33 Old Kent Road, St George the Martyr, Southwark TNA: RG 12//344 f183 p4
1901 living with her family and a servant at 1 St James Bldgs, High Rd, Leyton, Essex RG 13/1617 f44 p26
1906 emigrated to Canada 1921 Census of Canada
1910-05-28 m. Frank Henry Richardson (1884 – ?, in trucking), at Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada Harold Jarvis (1980) 'From Whence We Came. The Life Story of Albert Jarvis (1877–1966)'—file on Jarvisdescendants Yahoo group; information from Andrew Jarvis, 2009; 1911 Census of Canada; 1921 Census of Canada; Border Crossings from Canada to U.S., 1895–1956, entry for Philip; British Columbia marriage index
1911 living with her carpenter husband in Block 'C' Fruitlands, Kamloops, British Columbia 1911 Census of Canada
Children: Ethel Muriel (cal 1911 – after 1952) and Philip Harold (1914 – c. 1992) 1921 Census of Canada
1921 living with her husband and two children at 972 Wentworth N., Hamilton East, Ontario, Canada; Church of England 1921 Census of Canada
  Frank and Maud Richardson had a very active fuel business in Hamilton, and borrowed some $50,000 from Maud's brother Albert to expand the business. However they absconded, disappeared and surfaced some months later in Toronto operating an exterminating business. Though Albert felt this as a severe blow, and "couldn't believe that his sister would turn out to be a thief and scoundrel", they were eventually reconciled. Jarvis (1980)
1931 of 215 Caroline St S., Hamilton, Ontario Border Crossings from Canada to U.S., 1895–1956, entry for Philip
c. 1936 of Toronto, Ontario, Canada information from Andrew Jarvis, 2009


06. son Jarvis

  b. Harold Jarvis (1980) 'From Whence We Came. The Life Story of Albert Jarvis (1877–1966)'—file on Jarvisdescendants Yahoo group
  d. in infancy


07. son Jarvis

  b. Harold Jarvis (1980) 'From Whence We Came. The Life Story of Albert Jarvis (1877-1966)'—file on Jarvisdescendants Yahoo group
  d. in infancy


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This page was last revised on 2020-01-30.

 

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