Children of Edward and Rebecca Brady

01. Charles Brady, JP

1832-05-02 b. Dewsbury, Yorkshire TNA: PRO RG 6/495, /885; Annual Monitor; Ackworth Old Scholars' Association Annual Report 26, 1907
1841 of Market Str., Barnsley, Yorkshire, living with his family, three female servants, and a young draper PRO HO 107/1325/5 f46 p34
1842/1845 of Barnsley; at Ackworth School Ackworth School Centenary Committee (1879) List of the Boys and Girls Admitted into Ackworth School 17791879. London
1851 draper's apprentice, one of four such in the household of John Whiting, linen draper, of Leeds Bridge, Leeds, Yorkshire HO 107/2319 f141 p21
1861 woollen draper, living at 4 Market Hill, Barnsley, with his sister Marian and a domestic servant RG 9/3444 f54 p2
1862-06-13 draper, of Barnsley; m. Hannah Chipchase (1835–1913, b. Lathbury, near Cotherston, Romaldkirk, Yorkshire, d. of John and Alice (Robinson) Chipchase), at Cotherston fmh GRO index; censuses; Teesdale Mercury, 1862-06-18; Annual Monitor; Edward H. Milligan (2007) Biographical Dictionary of British Quakers in Commerce and Industry 17751920. York: Sessions Book Trust
  "his wife was a complete invalid for nearly the whole of their married life" Milligan (2007)
1865-06-29 gave evidence to the House of Lords committee on the Midland Railway (Barnsley to Kirkburton) Bill:

Mr. Charles Brady, draper, at Barnsley, stated that his goods were frequently brought from Huddersfield by the common carrier, in consequence of the delay which occurred when they were transmitted by railway. The present feeling at Barnsley was in favour of the line.

Cross-examined by Mr. Merewether—There are ten trains a day each way between Huddersfield and Barnsley.

Huddersfield Chronicle, 1865-07-01
1871 draper, of 24 Market Hill, Barnsley, living with his wife, a housekeeper, a cook, two other domestic servants, and a visitor RG 10/4644 f118 p6
1871-10-31 draper, of Market hill, nominated for the municipal election in East Ward, Barnsley Sheffield Independent
1872-11-01 Mr Charles Brady, draper, Market hill, the retiring member, returned unopposed Sheffield Independent, 1871-11-02
by 1876-04-04 had subscribed £8 for the Swaithe Main Colliery Explosion Relief Fund Sheffield Independent, 1876-04-04
1880-04-27 alderman, of Barnsley; a witness in a case at Easingwold (North Riding) Petty Sessions Leeds Mercury, 1880-04-28
1881 master draper employing 6 assistants, living at 2 Beech Grove, Barnsley, with his wife, a housemaid, and a cook RG 11/4603 f133 p48
1881-11-09 elected (Liberal) Mayor of Barnsley Yorkshire Gazette and Leeds Times, 1881-11-12
1883-09-08 draper, of 2 Beech-grove, Barnsley; co-executor of his father's will National Probate Calendar
1884-10-09

FRIENDS' SUNDAY SCHOOL TEMPERANCE MISSION.—The temperance mission was continued last night, Mr. Charles Brady, ex-Mayor of Barnsley, presiding.—The Chairman, in an earnest address, pressed home the fact that there was no neutral ground in this cause, that their influence must tell on one side or on the other. He spoke of the value of total abstinence in his own case, and called upon his hearers as citizens to join the side of social morality and order.

Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 1884-10-10
1887-09-12 gent; departed Liverpool for New York, aboard the SS Etruria, with four pieces of luggage; apparently travelling with another Quaker, George Gillett New York, passenger lists
1888-10-08 one of many signatories to a nonconformist declaration on marriage with a deceased wife's sister Leeds Mercury
1889-01-26 gentleman (L), of The Limes, Gawber, near Barnsley; elected unopposed for Barnsley East in the West Riding County Council election Leeds Times
1891 not found in census  
1891-11-28

Ald. Charles Brady, J.P., was elected a councillor at the first election after the incorporation of the borough, and six years later was elected an alderman in the room of the late Mr. Henry Richardson. A Liberal in politics, he has also had great influence on the Council, and has been Mayor two years. As chairman of the Water Committee he has been looked on as "the" authority on that subject, and as chairman of the Finance Committee his influence has led to the adoption of many an economy in the works of the Corporation. He resigns because of the increasing calls upon his time as chairman of the Finance Committee of the County Council, as treasurer of the Friends' School, Ackworth, and as auditor to the Friends' Insurance Society. An able man, of a somewhat reserved temperament, Mr. Brady has evidently been somewhat out of sympathy with his party, especially since the blunder of giving notice to the out-townships of intention to cut off supply, was made on his advice. The resignations will be accepted with regret, and it is certain that it will be some time before their places will be filled by men of such ability. It is satisfactory to know that personal considerations have nothing to do with the resignations, Mr. Brady having disclaimed anything of the kind [ . . . ]

Sheffield Daily Telegraph
1892-05-19 gentleman, of Barnsley; co-executor of the will of Hannah Brady York Herald, 1892-10-31
1894-06-16 presided at a special meeting of the executive committee of Barnsley Division Liberal Association, held a few days previously Leeds Mercury
1894-11-05 one of the speakers at the annual meeting of the Friends' Afternoon Adult School, in the Temperance Hall at Sheffield Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 1894-11-03
1896-01-27 gentleman, chairman of the Barnsley Division Liberal Association; already a county magistrate, now also appointed as a borough magistrate Sheffield Daily Telegraph
1896-08 living with his wife at The Limes, Barnsley Proceedings of the Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, Part XV, Eighth Month, 1896
1899-11-09

BARNSLEY MAGISTRATE BITTEN BY A DOG.

The Mayor (Ald. Wilkinson), Mr. H. Pigott, Mr. W. Jackson, and Councillor Rideal at Barnsley yesterday heard a charge against Mr. Herbert Crawshaw, architect, Gawber Road, that he was the owner of a ferocious dog which was dangerous and not kept under proper control.—Mr. Charles Brady, J.P., of The Limes, Gawber, who looked far from well, said that as he was returning home from the West Riding Court on Wednesday, the 1st inst., he noticed defendant's dog standing in front of his (defendant's) house on the footpath. Knowing the dangerous character of the dog from past experience he crossed the road in order to avoid it, and thought he had been successful, but was rudely awakened from that thought by feeling a terrible scrunch at the calf of his right leg, behind, and found that the dog had bitten him severely. On two previous occasions he had been attacked by this dog, but it was muzzled then and could not do a great deal of harm. On a third occasion his wife and her sister, Mrs. Walker, of Harrogate, were seriously alarmed by the conduct of the same dog, and had to use their umbrellas to drive it from them. He had called on one of these occasions and told Mrs. Crawshaw that the dog was of such a character that he should have to apply to the magistrates for an order for its destruction unless it could be kept up: but he could get no satisfaction. From what he knew personally the dog had been a complete terror to the neighbourhood for some time, and was an animal which never ought to be allowed at large. He respectfully asked the Bench to order it to be destroyed in the public interest and for the safety of himself and family.—Defendant said he had never known the dog was dangerous, and since Mr. Brady had told his wife the dog had attacked him when muzzled it had never been loose until the 1st November. On that day it was all right when he left home, but afterwards it was let out. He was sorry for what had happened, but could not but think the dog had had some provocation. The dog was not ferocious if let alone. He had disposed of it.—The Mayor said that made it worse, to let it go away to bite other people.—The Bench ordered the dog to be destroyed, defendant to pay the costs and be fined £1 a day if the dog was alive after to-day.

Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 1899-11-10
1901 retired draper, living at The Limes, Barugh, Yorkshire, with his wife, a cook, and a visitor RG 13/4316 f160 p9; Proceedings of the Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, Part XX, Eighth Month, 1901
1904-07-28 presided at the annual speech day of the Archbishop Holgate's Grammar School, Barnsley Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 1904-07-29
1905-01-24 presided at a public meeting at York fmh, in connection with Yorkshire QM Leeds Mercury, 1905-01-25
1905-07-21 presided at the annual meeting of the Governors of the Beckett Hospital, Barnsley Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 1905-07-22
1906-02-08 presided at the annual licensing sessions for the borough of Barnsley, at the town hall Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 1906-02-09
1906-04-19 re-elected as a vice-president of the Barnsley Tradesmen's Benevolent Association Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 1906-04-20
1907-03-25

ILLNESS OF MR. C. BRADY, J.P., BARNSLEY.

Mr. Charles Brady, J.P., of the Limes, Barnsley, lies at his home in a very serious condition, the bulletins issued during Saturday and yesterday giving rise to feelings of considerable anxiety.

Sheffield Daily Telegraph
1907-04-02 minister, of 'The Limes', Gawber, Barnsley, Yorkshire; d. there GRO index; Annual Monitor; National Probate Calendar; Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 1907-04-04

BRADY.—On April 2nd, at his residence, The Limes, Barnsley, in his 75th year, CHARLES BRADY, J.P. (Interment at three o'clock on Saturday afternoon, at Friends' Meeting-house. No flowers, by request.)

Leeds Mercury, 1907-04-04
1907-04-06

THE LATE MR. C. BRADY, J.P.

FUNERAL AT BARNSLEY.

With the simplicity and entire absence of rigid formula characteristic of the Society of Friends, the remains of Mr. Charles Brady, J.P., of The Limes, Gawbey, near Barnsley, were on Saturday interred in the ground adjoining the Meeting House, Huddersfield Road, Barnsley. Yet, by reason of its very simplicity, the ceremony was a deeply impressive one. There was a large attendance, representative of many of the societies and bodies to which the late Mr. Brady had been connected, and the silent tribute of respect and honour to his memory was deep and sincere. There were no flowers. The unwritten law which makes it necessary that people should grieve in a garb of black, is not recognised by Friends, and mourning attire was conspicuously not universal, but to those of other religious persuasions, the cemetery, though it might appear quaint, was nevertheless marked by much genuine sorrow, and the feeling that there was being put aside a man who can ill be spared from the circle wherein he wielded such a great influence for good.

A short service was held in the Meeting House, Alderman J.F. Clarke (Doncaster) reading a biblical extract, and Mr. J.B. Hodgkin followed in prayer. Subsequently, two short panegyrics were delivered by Mr. Wallis and Mr. Hodgkin.

Mr. Wallis spoke of the loss their own religious society had sustained with Mr. Brady's death, and Mr. Hodgkin also paid a warm tribute to the deceased gentleman's life and work. One nowadays, he said, heard much of the trimming of opinions and the loose holding of convictions to be changed as one wave of thought succeeded another, weakening the fibre of moral character, and lowering the standard of unselfishness, that the memory of the late Mr. Brady's life came as a refreshing and healthy tonic. He was content to worship in a meeting house, with all its simplicity, and cared nothing for the attractive externals which sometimes tempted men away from their sect. It would be a help and stimulus to them to remember how true Charles Brady was, and how unselfishly he lived his whole life.

At the graveside the ceremony again was of the utmost simplicity. A portion of Scripture was read by Mr. Andrews, and Alderman Clarke offered the concluding prayer.

The family mourners were Mrs. Charles Brady, widow; Dr. G. Brady (Sheffield), cousin; Mrs Walker, sister-in-law; Miss Thorp, Mr. Ed. and Mrs. Brady, Mr. O. Brady (London), brother; Miss R. Brady (Scarborough), sister; Mr. E. and Mrs. Watson (Newcastle) sister and brother-in-law; Mr W. and Mrs. Brady, brother; Mr. F.E. and Mrs. Brady, nephew; Mr. W.E. and Mrs. Brady, nephew; Mr. W.B. Brady, Miss Brady Webster, Mr. W. Brady, Miss Marjorie Brady, Mr. W.B. and Mrs. Webster, and Mrs. J.J. Armitage (Nottingham).

[numerous others present also listed]

Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 1907-04-08
1907-04-24 will proved at Wakefield by Hannah Brady, widow; effects £15,335 7s. National Probate Calendar

WILL OF MR. C. BRADY, BARNSLEY.

Mr. Charles Brady, J.P., of the Limes, Gawber, Barnsley, for many years in business as a draper at Market Hill, Barnsley, a former Mayor of the Borough, and until lately an alderman of the West Riding County Council, who died on the 2nd April last, aged 74 years, left estate of the gross value of £15,335 7s., of which the net personalty has been sworn at £11,690 7s. Probate of his will, dated 1st April, 1905, has been granted to his widow, to whom as she survived him, he left the whole of his property. If she had not survived him, he had bequeathed £100 each to the Beckett Hospital and Dispensary at Barnsley, Barnsley Tradesmen's Benevolent Institute, British and Foreign Bible Society, Yearly Meeting Fund of the Society of Friends, and Friends' School at Ackworth.

Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 1907-05-09
 

Charles Brady, of Barnsley, was the eldest son of Edward and Rebecca Brady, and was born at Dewsbury on the 2nd of 5th mo., 1832. As a youth of a quiet and studious disposition, he received his education first at Ackworth and afterwards at Benjamin Abbott's school, at Hitchin; and after an apprenticeship to Hotham & Whiting, of Leeds, he joined his father's business in Barnsley in 1853, remaining closely associated with it until his retirement in 1885. In 1862 he married Hannah Chipchase, daughter of John Chipchase, of Cotherston, an union which greatly conduced to his happiness, she proving a loving and true helpmeet through the long period of nearly forty-five years.

In 1869 Charles Brady became prominently associated with the local government of the town, being elected a member of the Town Council, of which body he remained a member until 1891, and during that period was twice Mayor. On the formation of the West Riding County Council in 1889, he was elected an Alderman of that body, and within a year was appointed chairman of the County Finance Committee. He continued to fill this onerous post with conspicuous ability until his retirement in 1895; declining meanwhile the chairmanship of the Council, which he was strongly urged to accept, on the resignation of that office by the Marquis of Ripon.

For the greater part of his life he was an active politician. No Liberal demonstration in the district during the past thirty years was considered complete without him, and had he consented he might have been returned un-opposed as the first member for the Barnsley Division.

In later years he was widely known as a borough and county magistrate. Gifted in a remarkable degree with the faculty of grasping clearly the essential points in the most intricate cases, to which he added a knowledge of the law such as is possessed by few justices, it would be difficult to speak too highly of the manner in which he discharged his magisterial duties. His colleagues fully recognised his ability and absolute impartiality, and after his decease touching testimony was borne by several to the great loss which had been sustained by the Bench.

Although it is not possible to dwell upon—barely even to epitomise—the many-sided activities of Charles Brady's long public career, mention should at least be made of his keen interest in education. For many years he was Treasurer of Ackworth School, and also a Governor of the Barnsley Grammar School; he was for twenty-two years President and Treasurer of the Friends' Adult Schools at Barnsley, which institutions owe much to his untiring attention and generosity. Temperance, the Anti-Opium Movement, and the work of the British and Foreign Bible Society, claimed in an especial manner his interest and sympathy; to the latter he was Treasurer of the local auxiliary, and at its annual meeting in Second Month, 1907, he gave a reception to the President and other friends of the cause, hoping thereby to stimulate interest in the Society's work locally; this was almost his last public act.

During the greater portion of his life, matters connected with the Society of Friends took up a large share of his time. An extract from his Journal may here throw light upon his earlier religious impressions; he writes:—

"In 1856 I first attended the Yearly Meeting, and I can never be thankful enough to my Heavenly Father for it and its results. It was the turning point of my life. Up to this time, though my outward conduct had been fairly moral and orderly, I knew nothing of the power of religion. Cold indifference, perhaps even secret cynical scepticism, was my real condition towards serious things. I was living in darkness, and, sad confession! practically without God in the world. Infinite mercy, however, so ordered that I was now arrested in this course of life; under, I consider, the influences of this Yearly Meeting, and principally by means of an address of the late John Pease, I became awakened to my true condition in God's holy sight, and the need of reconciliation and pardon. My hard, proud nature was measurably broken down, and I returned home an altered man. I record this experience in deep humility, and am very conscious of my shortcomings since that day, but with the thankful recognition that the Lord thus met with me, and has enabled me, though with many alternations of religious experience, never entirely to forsake Him in the interval. My thoughts, tastes and life were from that time changed. The Bible and serious books, especially those of Friends, became, from being my aversion, my great comfort and solace. I recall with wonder how happy I felt for weeks after my return home. Passages of Scripture never yet understood and long forgotten were opened to my understanding, and my soul was habitually filled with joy in the new found sense of reconciliation and peace. I felt it clearly required of me to identify myself fully with the Society of Friends, of which I had hitherto been a nominal member only, and that to this end I must take up, not as a tradition, but as an individual testimony the plain dress and language of the Friends of that day. I felt that I was willing to become a fool for Christ's sake and was, I have not the least doubt, led by the Spirit of God into the adoption of these things. It is right here to say, that a few years after, when these peculiarities ceased to be the outward badge of Quakerism, I felt released from continuing them in my own case. Knowing, however, how imperative they once were to my own conscience, I have always felt bound to respect the convictions of others with regard to such matters. I am quite aware that there may seem to some who read these words some inconsistency in adopting a course at one time and relinquishing it a few years later. I do not attempt any explanation, but simply record facts and impressions. If I were to say anything more it would be to advise close attention to convictions of duty, even in matters which appear to be trivial. The same Apostle who said, 'Why is my liberty judged of another man's conscience?' also wrote 'Let every man be fully persuaded in his own mind.' The reading of Wm. Penn's ' No Cross, no Crown ' was blessed to me at this juncture, and though it was no small trial to me to put on the plain coat of a Friend, and to address everyone as 'thee' and 'thou,' when I had been used to a different course, I felt peace in yielding my will to what were undoubtedly the Lord's requirings in my new condition. Since the period here spoken of, although sometimes prevented by special circumstances, I have always felt the importance to me of a regular attendance at the Monthly, Quarterly and Yearly Meetings of the Society of Friends."

For several years he acted as Clerk to his own Monthly Meeting, to Yorkshire Quarterly Meeting, and for fourteen years was one of the Assistant Clerks to London Yearly Meeting. He was also one of the delegates to the Richmond [Indiana] Conference in the autumn of 1887. A few months previously he, with other Friends, went as a deputation from the Society to Windsor Castle to present an address of congratulation to Queen Victoria on the occasion of her Jubilee.

Charles Brady was decidedly a man of faith and prayer, and habitually waited upon God for guidance in the many weighty matters that from time to time came before Friends; thus his thoughts were matured and the expressions of his opinion valued by his friends. A member of his Monthly Meeting writes, "It is only since I have been brought into closer touch with Charles Brady that I have at all realised what he was to the Monthly Meeting. He was emphatically the wise counsellor and friend to the whole meeting, guiding the discussions and decisions with ripe wisdom, and with an evident desire that a right conclusion should be arrived at, even if at times it did not entirely run in accordance with his personal preferences. This influence was acquired by his long and consistent life, and his efforts to invigorate and raise the tone of our meetings."

In 1878 he was recorded a Minister, after having filled the office of Elder for some time. Frequent in the exercise of his gift in his own Meeting, in Monthly and Quarterly Meetings he was ever willing to take his full share in the meeting's responsibility, as also in visitation and other appointments. He paid many visits in England and Scotland (in several of which he was accompanied by his wife), on behalf of the Home Mission Committee, a branch of the Society's work in which he had been actively interested since its formation.

In 1893 Chas. Brady visited with a minute from his Monthly Meeting, the counties of Essex, Suffolk and Norfolk. Of this visit he records: "I met with great kindness from Friends, and though feeling rather painfully at times the responsibility undertaken, was favoured to get through with a sense of Divine help and restfulness."

The closing weeks of his life were spent in his own home; he had for some time felt his strength failing. A trying disorder which kept him a good deal in the house and sometimes from meeting, was borne in a spirit of meekness that impressed those who came into contact with him. He had for many years believed it to be the duty of the head of the house to offer vocal prayer daily in the family reading. His gentle and humble spirit was noticeable in his prayers at these times, and how deeply he felt his unworthiness in his Heavenly Father's sight was manifest. Frequent and earnest were his prayers during his last few days for the members of his own meeting, for the Society of Friends, and for a blessing upon his country; nor were the missionaries in far distant lands forgotten.

He died in the faith and hope of the Gospel, resting alone on the merits of his Redeemer; he said he could adopt the words as his own:—

"I stand upon His merit,

I know no other stand."

And also the lines from Whittier:—

"I have but Thee, my Father, let Thy Spirit

  Be with me then to comfort and uphold;

No gate of pearl, no branch of palm I merit,

  No street of shining gold.

 

"Some humble door among the many mansions,

  Some sheltering shade where sin and striving cease,

And flows for ever through heaven's green expansions,

  The river of Thy peace."

Peace was his continual portion, and he passed gently to his rest on the night of the 2nd of Fourth Month, 1907.

1908 Annual Monitor
 

CHARLES BRADY (scholar 1842–5), son of Edward and Rebecca Brady, née Foster, was born at Dewsbury, on the 2nd of May, 1832.

Nine years after this, his parents removed to Barnsley, where his father founded a drapery business, still carried on by members of the family. From this town, Charles was sent to Ackworth, and from thence to Hitchin School. He was apprenticed to Hotham & Whiting, of Leeds, in the drapery trade, after which he returned to Barnsley, and ultimately became partner in his father's business, from which he retired in 1883.

On the 13th June, 1862, he married Hannah Chipchase (scholar 1845–7), daughter of John and Alice Chipchase, of Cotherston.

Charles Brady was possessed of sound judgment and great business capacity, which he placed ungrudgingly at the service of his fellows. He was a staunch Friend and an active citizen. He acted as Clerk of Yorkshire Quarterly Meeting with ability, showing a genius for gathering the sense of the Meeting, and embodying it in a minute, while in his own Monthly Meeting he was the authority on all points of constitutional procedure. He was from 1880 to 1896 one of the Assistant Clerks of London Yearly Meeting, also a member of the Home Mission Committee, and one of the delegates to the Richmond Conference of American Friends, held in the autumn of 1888.

Charles Brady was fully forty years old before he took vocal part in Meetings for Worship. His gift was soon recognised, and he was recorded a minister in 1878. He visited frequently in company with his wife the meetings in his own Monthly and Quarterly Meeting, and at times he paid visits to Meetings in different parts of the country. Retiring from business in the prime of life, he gave much time to civic and public affairs. He was twice Mayor of Barnsley, 1881 to 1883, and for five years Chairman of the Finance Committee of the West Riding County Council, in which capacity he had to deal with an annual revenue of a quarter of a million, and his yearly budget statements were so masterly as to attract special attention.

In later years, with the exception of magisterial duties and educational interests, and as Treasurer of Ackworth School, and in 1893–4 as President of the Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, of which he was one of the 168 original members, he devoted himself almost wholly to religious and philanthropic work.

Charles Brady held decided views on certain questions, especially as a strong promoter of Temperance, but his main and sincere anxiety was to be absolutely fair and unbiassed. As the Mayor said on the Borough Bench the day after his death. " Charles Brady was perhaps the most eminent, most talented and most capable townsman Barnsley had ever produced."

He died on the 2nd of April, 1907, in his seventy-fifth year.

Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, Annual Report, 1907, xxvi.89–90
  local obituaries Yorkshire Evening Post, 1907-04-03; Sheffield Independent, Leeds Mercury, and Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser, 1907-04-04


02. Edwin Brady

1834-04-16 b. Dewsbury, Yorkshire TNA: PRO RG 6/885, /895
1835-05-29 of Dewsbury; d. Pontefract MM PRO RG 6/886, /916
1835-06-01 bur. Dewsbury


03. Edward Brady

1836-03-27 b. Dewsbury, Yorkshire TNA: PRO RG 6/885, /896
1841 of Market Str., Barnsley, Yorkshire, living with his family, three female servants, and a young draper PRO HO 107/1325/5 f46 p34
1846/1850 of Barnsley; at Ackworth School Ackworth School Centenary Committee (1879) List of the Boys and Girls Admitted into Ackworth School 17791879. London
1851 scholar, of Tulketh Hall, Ashton, Lancashire HO 107/2268 f550 p2
1858-06-23 confectioner, of Barnsley; m. Catharine Richards (1830–1913, b. Cambourne, Cornwall, d. of Richard and Mary (Edmunds) Richards), at Redruth fmh, Cornwall GRO index; censuses; Annual Monitor; AOSA Annual Report 27, 1908; Edward H. Milligan (2007) Biographical Dictionary of British Quakers in Commerce and Industry 17751920. York: Sessions Book Trust; Cornwall OPC marriage database
Children: Foster Edmunds (1859–1944), William Edward (1862–1949), Harold (1848–1868), Arthur Charles (1865–1868), and John Henry (1868–1868), all b. Barnsley GRO index; censuses
1860-12-15

C H R I S T M A S.

EDWARD BRADY, Jun., Confectioner and Pastry Cook,

54, CHURCH STREET, BARNSLEY,

BEGS respectfully to announce that he has just received a Large and Choice Assortment of Fancy Confectionary Bon Bons, suitable for the approaching season. Also, a large variety of Fancy Articles, suitable for furnishing Christmas Trees, Presents, &c.

E.B. solicits a trial of his celebrated PORK PIES, admitted to excel Melton Mowbray.

Bride Cakes, Funeral Biscuits, superior British Wines. Ornamental Confectionery always on hand, suitable for Parties.

N.B.—CHRISTMAS CAKES OF EVERY VARIETY.

Barnsley Chronicle, etc.
1861 not found in census  
1863-01-10

CHRISTMAS HAS COME ! ! !

AND

EDWARD BRADY, JUNR.,

54, CHURCH-STREET,

HAS just received a large and well-assorted Stock of FANCY GOODS, TOYS, &c. Suitable for PRESENTS and the Decoration of CHRISTMAS TREES, which are to be cleared off at prices defying competition.

AN EARLY INSPECTION OF THE SHOW ROOM RESPECTFULLY SOLICITED.

CHRISTMAS CAKES ON HAND AND MADE TO ORDER.

FOWLS, DUCKS, GEESE, TURKEYS, AND OTHER POULTRY.,

ON THE SHORTEST NOTICE.

BRIDE CAKES IN ALL SIZES.

N.B.—The Season having set in, E.B. has commenced making his Celebrated PORK PIES.

ALL SIZES IN STOCK.

Barnsley Chronicle, etc.
1871 confectioner employs 3 girls 1 boy, of 1 Queen Street, Barnsley, living with his family and a domestic servant RG 10/4645 f7 p8
1881 confectioner, of 1 Queen Street, Barnsley, living with his wife and his son William, with three general servants, four confectioner's shopwomen, and three confectioner's assistants RG 11/4601 f111 p1
1883-09-08 confectioner, of Queen-street, Barnsley; co-executor of his father's will National Probate Calendar; Barnsley Chronicle, etc., 1883-12-01
1885-03-14

See the British and Foreign Confectioner for March, 1885, for a favourable review of Edward Brady's 6d. cocoa-nut cakes.


READ what the British and Foreign Confectioner says about Edward Brady's famous 6d. cocoa-nut cakes. "The cocoa-nut cake is decidedly a good thing. Fresh and sweet is the flavour of the nut, and the whole blend is a happy one."

Barnsley Chronicle, etc.
1885-03-21

EDWARD BRADY'S 6d. Madeira Cake. The British and Foreign Confectioner says; "It is a good cake."

Barnsley Chronicle, etc.
1886-03-25 confectioner; co-executor of the will of John Jubb Hinchcliffe, late of Barnsley, gentleman Barnsley Chronicle, etc., 1886-04-10
1886-12-11

CHRISTMAS PORK PIES. CHRISTMAS PORK PIES.

THE MOST ACCEPTABLE OF CHRISTMAS PRESENTS.

E D W A R D   B R A D Y'S

Original and Justly-celebrated

BARNSLEY PORK PIES ARE THE BEST.

CHRISTMAS CAKES. CHRISTMAS CAKES.

A large and skilfully-prepared stock to select from, all good value, including—

RICH PLUM CAKES,     BALMORAL CAKES, SPONGE CAKES,

GENEVA CAKES,          SEED CAKES,         MADEIRA CAKES,

RICE CAKES,               ORNAMENTED BRIDES' & CHRISTMAS CAKES.

The well-known favourite E. BRADY'S COCOA-NUT CAKES, 6d. & 1s. each.

CURRANT CAKE at 6d. and 8d. per lb., both good value and invaluable for family use.

COSAQUES in great variety. ORNAMENTAL GRASSES, &c.

EDWARD BRADY, CONFECTIONER, 1, QUEEN-STREET, BARNSLEY.

Barnsley Chronicle, etc.
1887-01-08

A MOST artistic selection of Dried Foreign Grasses, Leaves, &c., for Xmas decorations—Edward Brady, 1, Queen-street, Barnsley.

Barnsley Chronicle, etc.
1887-12-17

MEMORIAL WREATHS and Crosses in Artificial and Everlasting Flowers. A splendid assortment, marked off cheap, from 1s. 6d. each.—E. Brady, Confectioner, 1, Queen-street, Barnsley.


EDWARD BRADY'S latest addition to his list of famous Sixpenny Cakes is the "Ginger Cake," which is a worthy companion of the Cocoa-Nut, Seed, Jubilee, Sponge, and Madeira Cakes at 6d. each.—1, Queen-street, Barnsley.

Barnsley Chronicle, etc.
1888-04-07

EDWARD BRADY'S PORK PIES. The best obtainable; 30 years' good reputation; always reliable for freshness, purity, and flavour.—1, Queen-street.


MEMORIAL Wreaths and Crosses, in dried natural and artificial flowers, metal, porcelain, &c. Splendid assortment to select from. Prices from 1s.—E. Brady, Confectioner, 1, Queen-street.


SIMNEL CAKES.—For best quality and most striking designs, at moderate prices, buy from E. Brady, of 1, Queen-street, Barnsley, the Makers of the celebrated 6d. Cocoa Nut, Madeira Jubilee, Seed, Ginger, and Sponge Cakes.

Barnsley Chronicle, etc.
1891 confectioner, employer, of 4 Victoria Rd, Barnsley, living with his wife, a cook, a housemaid, and a visiting Albert Pollard RG 12/3772 f71 p21
1892-08-20

BARNSLEY FEAST.—Those who are expecting visitors, and those who are not, cannot do better than treat themselves to Edward Brady's Pies and Cakes.—E. BRADY, Confectioner, 1, Queen-street, Barnsley.

Barnsley Chronicle, etc.
1892-11-19

HOVIS BISCUITS! Richly nutritious, easy of digestion, appetising flavour. 6d. per lb. Made by EDWARD BRADY, Confectioner, 1, Queen-street, Barnsley.

Barnsley Chronicle, etc.
1894-07-06

MIDLAND INSTITUTE OF MINING ENGINEERS.—6th. The first meeting of this body was held in its rooms over the shop of Mr. Edward Brady, confectioner, Queen-street.

Barnsley Chronicle, etc.
1896-08 of Harwood House, Victoria Road, Barnsley Proceedings of the Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, Part XV, Eighth Month, 1896
1901 confectioner baker, living at 2 Victoria Rd, Barnsley, with his wife, a housemaid, and a cook RG 13/4314 f81 p11
of Harwood House, Victoria Road, Barnsley Proceedings of the Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, Part XX, Eighth Month, 1901
1911 retired confectioner, living in 11 rooms at 2 Victoria Rd, Barnsley, with his wife and two domestic servants RG14PN27575 RG78PN1578 RD507 SD2 ED16 SN336
  not closely connected with Quaker activities, but for nearly 30 years was active in the management of Barnsley adult school AOSA Annual Report 30, 1911; Milligan (2007)
1911-06-16 of 2 Victoria-road, Barnsley; d. there GRO index; Annual Monitor; National Probate Calendar
1912-11-16 will proved at Wakefield by Foster Edmunds Brady, organising secretary, and William Edward Brady, confectioner; effects £9273 6s. 8d. National Probate Calendar


04. Oswald Brady

1838-08-27 b. Dewsbury, Yorkshire GRO index; censuses; Margaret Page (December 1994) 'The Brady Bible', Quaker Connections 3:19–23
1841 of Market Str., Barnsley, Yorkshire, living with his family, three female servants, and a young draper TNA: PRO HO 107/1325/5 f46 p34
1851 scholar, of Ackworth School, Ackworth, Yorkshire PRO HO 107/2331 f56 p8
1854-03-15 removal to Albans Monthly Meeting West Yorkshire Non-Conformist Records
1861 not found in census  
1861-12-19

To Pontefract Mo Meeting of Friends

Dear Friends

                    Oswald Brady a member of this meeting has removed to Barnsley in the compass of yours; and upon inquiry made relative to his conduct and respecting debts nothing appears to prevent the issuing of a certificate on his behalf; we therefore recommend him to your Christian care and remain with love your

                                                                                                                 Your Friends

Signed in and on behalf of Mountmellick Mo Meeting held at Mount Rath the 19th of 12th Mo 1861         Richard Neale

Mountmellick MM births and burials 1799– , removals 1831–1865
1862-02-10 of Barnsley; member of Pontefract MM, following removal from Mountmellick West Yorkshire Non-Conformist Records
1862-11-25 unsuccessful candidate in the election of a collector of water rates, in Barnsley Sheffield Independent, 1862-11-26
1868-03-01 m. Elizabeth Kezia Seear (1836–1915, of Fulham, b. Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire, d. of Charles Robert and Elizabeth Seear), at All Saints pc, Fulham, Middlesex, after banns parish register; GRO index; censuses; Hemel Hempstead parish register
1868-07-20 resigned his membership of the Society of Friends West Yorkshire Non-Conformist Records
Children: Mabel (1871–1955), Charles Edward (1872–1956), and Marian Elizabeth (1876–1968), all b. Kilburn, London GRO index; censuses
1871 goods agent L. & N.W. Ry, of 54 Canterbury Rd, Willesden, Middlesex, living with his family and his brother-in-law RG 10/1329 f25 p44
1876-01-16 railway clerk, of 47 Chichester Road, Kilburn, Middlesex parish register
1881 railway clerk, living with his family at 97 5th Avenue, Chelsea, London RG 11/88 f67 p14
1891 not found in census  
1901 retired railway clerk, living with his family at 2 Hawthorn Villas, High St, Wealdstone, Middlesex RG 13/1209 f44 p10
1910-06-05 of 2 Hawthorn-villas, High-road, Wealdstone, Middlesex; d. Hendon RD GRO index; National Probate Calendar
1910-05-21 will proved at London by Elizabeth Kezia Brady, widow, and Charles Edward Brady, solicitor; effects £1526 8s. 6d. National Probate Calendar


05. Marian Brady

1840-05-22 b. Dewsbury, Yorkshire GRO index; censuses; Annual Monitor; West Yorkshire Non-Conformist Records; Margaret Page (December 1994) 'The Brady Bible', Quaker Connections 3:19–23
1841 of Market Str., Barnsley, Yorkshire, living with her family, three female servants, and a young draper TNA: PRO HO 107/1325/5 f46 p34
1851 with her sister Alice, one of six scholars in the household of Lucy Waterfall, schoolmistress, of 36 Woodhouse Lane, Leeds, Yorkshire PRO HO 107/2321 f592 p6
1861 housekeeper, living at 4 Market Hill, Barnsley, with her brother Charles and a domestic servant RG 9/3444 f54 p2
1871 living with her family at The Limes, Barugh, Yorkshire, with a housemaid and a cook RG 10/4647 f115 p34
1881 of The Limes, Barugh, Yorkshire, living with her widowed father, her brother Walter, her sister Rebecca, a cook, and a housemaid RG 11/4604 f169 p33
1891 own means, of 2 Cromwell Ter., Scarborough, Yorkshire, living with her sister Rebecca and a domestic servant RG 12/3967 f57 p20
1901 living at 2 Cromwell Terr., Scarborough, with her sister Rebecca and a cook RG 13/4532 f147 p33
1911 private means, of Rodslea, Wespowell Valley, Scarborough, living with her sister Rebecca and a domestic servant RG14PN28944 RG78PN1666 RD527 SD2 ED20 SN206
1912-11-16 of Rosslea, Weaponness Valley, Scarborough; d. Scarborough RD GRO index; Annual Monitor; National Probate Calendar
1912-12-04 will proved at London by Rebecca Brady, spinster, and Charles Edward Brady, solicitor; effects £1771 2s. 4d. National Probate Calendar


06. Alice Brady

1842-09-19 b. Barnsley, Silkstone, Yorkshire birth note; GRO index; censuses; Margaret Page (December 1994) 'The Brady Bible', Quaker Connections 3:19–23
1851 with her sister Marian, one of six scholars in the household of Lucy Waterfall, schoolmistress, of 36 Woodhouse Lane, Leeds, Yorkshire TNA: PRO HO 107/2321 f592 p6
1861 living at Jordan Hill, Barnsley, with her family, a cook, and a housemaid PRO RG 9/3445 f27 p47
1871 living with her family at The Limes, Barugh, Yorkshire, with a housemaid and a cook RG 10/4647 f115 p34
1872-08-22 of Barnsley; m. Edward Watson (1841–1929), at Barnsley fmh, Yorkshire censuses; GRO index; Quaker Connections 3:22; Newcastle Courant, 1872-08-30; marriage register
Children: Edward Joshua (1873–1935), Alice Foster (1876–1964), Hugh Carrick (1880–1948), and Noel Brady (1885–1958) GRO index; censuses; National Probate Calendar; Old York Scholars' Association (1971) Bootham School Register. London: Oyez Press; H. Winifred Sturge, ed. (n.d. [1932]) A Register of Old Scholars of The Mount School, York 1931–1932. Leominster: The Orphans' Printing Press; Quaker Connections 3:22
1881 living with her family at 12 The Crescent, Gateshead, with a cook and a nurse RG 11/5040 f44 p36
1891 living with her family at 12 The Crescent, Gateshead, with a cook and a house maid RG 12/4184 f77 p10
1901 living at West Over, Gateshead, with her family, a cook, and a housemaid RG 13/4760 f179 p61
1911 living with her family, a cook, and a housemaid, in 12 rooms at Westover Low Fell, Durham RG14PN30488 RG78PN1748B RD557 SD2 ED78 SN378
1921-05-31 of West Bank, Durham-road, Gateshead; d. Gateshead RD GRO index; National Probate Calendar
1921-11-22 will proved at London by Edward Watson retired surveyor, and Hugh Carrick Watson, chartered accountant; effects £1460 6s. 7d. National Probate Calendar


07. Lucy Brady

1846-08-10 b. Barnsley, Silkstone, Yorkshire birth note; GRO index; TNA: PRO HO 107/2332 f513A p40; Margaret Page (December 1994) 'The Brady Bible', Quaker Connections 3:19–23
1851 living in Market Hill, Barnsley, Yorkshire, with her family, a cook, and a housemaid PRO HO 107/2332 f513A p40
1860-01-11 of Barnsley; d. Barnsley RD GRO index; burial note; West Yorkshire Non-Conformist RecordsAnnual Monitor
1860-01-15 bur. Barnsley fmh burial note


08. Richard Brady

1848-04-14 b. Barnsley, Silkstone, Yorkshire GRO index; birth note; Margaret Page (December 1994) 'The Brady Bible', Quaker Connections 3:19–23
c. 1848-04-21 d. Ecclesfield, Yorkshire GRO index; Page (1994)


09. Walter Brady, JP

1849-05-13 b. Barnsley, Yorkshire GRO index; censuses; West Yorkshire Non-Conformist Records; Margaret Page (December 1994) 'The Brady Bible', Quaker Connections 3:19–23
1851 living in Market Hill, Barnsley, Yorkshire, with his family, a cook, and a housemaid TNA: PRO HO 107/2332 f513A p40
1860/1863 of Barnsley; at Ackworth School Ackworth School Centenary Committee (1879) List of the Boys and Girls Admitted into Ackworth School 17791879. London
1861 scholar, of Ackworth School, Ackworth, Yorkshire PRO RG 9/3440 f44 p4
1863/1864 educated at Bootham School, York Old York Scholars' Association (1971) Bootham School Register. London: Oyez Press; Bootham
1867-04-11 removed to Cheshire MM West Yorkshire Non-Conformist Records
1869-07-19 removed from Cheshire MM to Barnsley MM West Yorkshire Non-Conformist Records
  apprenticed to the drapery trade with Samuel Harlock, at Nantwich, but was called home before the expiration of his indentures so as to enter the drapery business his father had established in Barnsley in 1841 Edward H. Milligan (2007) Biographical Dictionary of British Quakers in Commerce and Industry 1775–1920. York: Sessions Book Trust
1871 draper, living with his family at The Limes, Barugh, Yorkshire, with a housemaid and a cook RG 10/4647 f115 p34
1881 draper, member of firm, of The Limes, Barugh, Yorkshire, living with his widowed father, his sisters Marian and Rebecca, a cook, and a housemaid RG 11/4604 f169 p33
1882 Q2 m. Maria Bowman (1852–1935, b. Monyash, Derbyshire, d. of William and Elizabeth (Armitage) Bowman), at Bakewell fmh, Derbyshire GRO index; censuses; Derbyshire registrars' marriage index
Children: Dorothy (1883–1890), Walter Bowman (1884–1962), Marjorie (1887–1972), and Maurice (1891–1976), all b. Barnsley GRO index; censuses
1885-10-21 of Barnsley; removal to Pickering MM West Yorkshire Non-Conformist Records
1885-11-24 of Barnsley; seconded a nomination for Barnsley Division Sheffield Independent, 1885-11-26
1889-03-05 presided at an election meeting in Barnsley Sheffield Independent, 1885-03-06
1891 linen and woollen draper, employer, living at Oakfield House, Barnsley, with his family, a cook, and a nurse RG 12/3773 f74 p56
1892-09-09 re elections for the town council: "The Radicals of the West Ward had a meeting on Friday night, and adopted Mr. Walter Brady, draper, of Market hill, and Oakfield, Pogmore, as their candidate, and according to present feeling he will not be opposed." Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 1892-09-12
1892-09-15 elected unopposed; had claimed just 9s. 6d. in expenses Leeds Mercury, 1892-09-16; Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 1892-10-15
1892-11-10 presided at a tea and meeting given by the Barnsley Women's Liberal Association Sheffield Independent, 1892-11-11
1893-11-01

After 12 months' service with general satisfaction, Mr. Walter Brady, the Liberal representative in the West Ward, was opposed by Mr. Walter Dunk another "Independent" candidate and nominee of the Master Builders' Association. Though Mr. Brady has not had a long spell of office, he has already given indications of his business abilities in dealing with several questions which should have secured for him the support of the electors in the ward generally.

 

elected by 454 votes to 333
Sheffield Independent, 1893-11-02
1895-10-01 councillor, recommended by Barnsley Town Council for appointment to the borough bench Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 1895-10-03
1896-08 living with his wife at Oakfield, Barnsley Proceedings of the Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, Part XV, Eighth Month, 1896
1897-04-05 councillor, JP; presided at a meeting of the Barnsley Chamber of Commerce, at the Town Hall Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 1897-04-06
1899-10-18 meeting held under the auspices of the Barnsley Town Liberal Association:

The Chairman said they had not come to find fault with any, or to abuse those who differed from them, but to show their appreciation of the services of Councillor Walter Brady. He did not anticipate Mr. Brady would be opposed in the coming election. They knew if he was opposed it would be politics pure and simple, because apart from that there was not a Conservative or Liberal, a man or a woman, who could say a word against the conduct of Mr. Brady in the nearly nine years he had sat in the Council. If he was opposed it would not be because the Conservatives did not know his value—they knew that as well as he. He did not care whether a man was Conservative or Liberal so much, but they could not afford to lose such a man as Mr. Brady, especially from the Park and Lighting Committee, when they were just going into the electric lighting.

Mr. Harral, Mr. Peace, and Mr. Wheelhouse spoke to a resolution of thanks to Mr. Brady, which was carried.

Councillor Brady, replying, said he was prepared to fight anyone who came against him. This was not a challenge, but he wished it to be known that he should not retire without doing his best to hold the seat.

Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 1899-10-19
1901 draper JP West Riding & Boro, employer, living with his family at Oakfield House, Barnsley RG 13/4314 f151 p31
1902-10-08

. . . it may be taken for granted that Mr. Brady will also seek re-election. Mr. Brady is the only Radical representative for the West Ward, which is unquestionably the most Conservative in the town. The members of that Party have, as a body, great regard for Mr. Brady's abilities as a member of the Town Council, and would be—indeed, they are—willing to allow him an unopposed return under ordinary circumstances. But if the Radicals and Free Church Council persist in thrusting the Education Bill forward, and making it a test question, then the very acceptance of this challenge will render opposition to Mr. Brady necessary, and he will be opposed.

Sheffield Daily Telegraph
  served as a JP and on the Town Council, being an Alderman and member of the Education and Finance Committees Milligan (2007)
1902-11 had been returned "by an overwhelming majority" over his Conservative opponent Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 1902-12-02
1903-12-03 of Crescent House, Barnsley; a member of the Grand Jury at the Leeds Autumn Assizes Leeds Mercury, 1903-12-04
shortly before 1904-06-01 promoted to the Aldermanic bench Leeds Mercury, 1904-06-01
1907-08 chairman of the Finance Committee Sheffield Independent, 1907-09-18
1911 shopkeeper (draper), employer, living in 9 rooms at Crescent House, Barnsley, with his family, a general servant, and a visitor RG14PN27572 RG78PN1578 RD507 SD2 ED13 SN76
on retirement, moved to Badsey, near Evesham, Worcestershire Milligan (2007)
1930-10-12 of Badsey, near Evesham; d. Bretforton Road, Badsey GRO index; National Probate Calendar; Milligan (2007)
1931-04-24 will proved at Birmingham by Maria Brady, widow; effects £222 13s. 6d. National Probate Calendar


10. Rebecca Brady

1853-03-17 b. Barnsley, Silkstone, Yorkshire GRO index; censuses; birth note; West Yorkshire Non-Conformist Records; Margaret Page (December 1994) 'The Brady Bible', Quaker Connections 3:19–23
1861 living at Jordan Hill, Barnsley, with her family, a cook, and a housemaid TNA: PRO RG 9/3445 f27 p47
1871 living with her family at The Limes, Barugh, Yorkshire, with a housemaid and a cook PRO RG 10/4647 f115 p34
1881 of The Limes, Barugh, Yorkshire, living with her widowed father, her brother Walter, her sister Marian, a cook, and a housemaid RG 11/4604 f169 p33
1885-10-21 of Barnsley; removal to Pickering MM West Yorkshire Non-Conformist Records
1891 own means, of 2 Cromwell Ter., Scarborough, Yorkshire, living with her sister Marian and a domestic servant RG 12/3967 f57 p20
1901 living at 2 Cromwell Terr., Scarborough, with her sister Marian and a cook RG 13/4532 f147 p33
1911 private means, of Rodslea, Wespowell Valley, Scarborough, living with her sister Marian and a domestic servant RG14PN28944 RG78PN1666 RD527 SD2 ED20 SN206
1912-12-04 co-executor of the will of her sister Marian National Probate Calendar
1931-01-04 of Ivyholme, Allonby, Cumberland; d. Wigton RD GRO index; National Probate Calendar
1931-02-03 will proved at London by Hugh Carrick Watson, accountant, and Charles Edward Brady, solicitor National Probate Calendar


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