Children of William and Lucy Pollard

* An asterisk beside the name means the photo identification is not certain. *

Mary Sophia (Pollard) Sparkes 01. Mary Sophia Pollard (Sophie)*

1854-11-26 b. Ackworth, Hemsworth, Yorkshire Pollard book, Illustrated London News family record, both now at West Sussex RO; birth certificate
1861 scholar, of Rd leading to Carr Bridge, Low Ackworth, Yorkshire, living with her family, a house maid and a nurse maid TNA: PRO RG 9/3440 f25 p17
1865 to 1867 pupil at Ackworth School Ackworth School Centenary Committee (1879) List of the Boys and Girls Admitted into Ackworth School 1779–1879
after 1867 finished her education at a Friends' School at Lewes, Sussex, kept by Rachel Special and Mary & Catherine Trusted Ms notes on the family of William and Lucy Pollard, probably by Wilfred Sparkes; Dictionary of Quaker Biography
1871 of Holmesdale Rd, Reigate, Surrey, living with family and a general servant PRO RG 10/830 f83 p19
1874-08-01 . . . "Sophie goes off the same day to Darlington" . . . letter from William Pollard to William Henry Pollard, 1874-07-30, privately held
1874-08-03/–04 of Manchester; attended conference of Friends’ First-day School Association at Darlington The Friend XIV Aug:273
1880-08-25 of Sale, near Manchester; married Joseph John Sparkes (1848–1894, yarn salesman, of Rochdale), at Ashton-on-Mersey Friends' meeting house National Probate Calendar; The Friend XX Sept:252; The British Friend XXXVIII Sept: 238; DQB
1881 living with her husband and a general servant at 24 William Street, Castleton, Lancashire RG 11/4107 f74 p44
Children: Malcolm (1881–1933), Wilfred (1884–1958), Brian (1885–1955), Eric (1889–1949) National Probate Calendar; The Friend; The British Friend XXXIX Nov:291, XLII June:89, XLIII Oct:254; XLVII June ads:8; Old York Scholars' Association (1971) Bootham School Register; Edward H. Milligan (2007) Biographical Dictionary of British Quakers in Commerce and Industry 1775–1920
1883-07-04 with her husband, present at the wedding of Robert Foster Spence and Maria Dunning, at Middlesborough fmh York Herald, 1883-07-05
1891 living with husband, three children, servant and nurse at 36 William St, Castleton, Rochdale, Lancashire RG 12/3331 f108 p25
1891 moved with family to Reading DQB
c. 1892-09 staying c/o Mrs Parsons, May View House, Swanage, Dorset Pollard budget letter, note by Arthur B. Pollard
1894-08-31 co-executor of her husband's will National Probate Calendar
1894 of Whiteknight's House, Reading, Berkshire Proceedings of the Ackworth Old Scholars' Association. Part XIII. Eighth Month, 1894
1901 living on own means, of High Ackworth, Ackworth, Yorkshire, with a general servant RG 13/4306 f14 p19
1901/1930 of Wembley one of the Sparkes brothers, Ms notes on the family of William and Lucy Pollard
1904 of The Hawthorns, Wembley, near Middlesex [sic]; gave Frank & Mary Pollard a chair and a cushion, for their wedding present Mary S.W. Pollard, list of wedding presents
1910 of Wembley, Middlesex The Friend; The British Friend
1910 of The Hawthorns, Wembley S.O., Middlesex Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, Annual Report 29
1911 living with two sons and a servant in 9 rooms at The Hawthorns, Wembley, Middlesex RG14PN7095 RG78PN347 RD130 SD1 ED28 SN218
1917-07-04 of the Hawthorns Frank & Mary Pollard letters
1920 of Wembley, Middlesex The Friend; The British Friend
1930/1935 of St Albans, Hertfordshire Ms notes on the family of William and Lucy Pollard
1931-11-18 had recently moved house Frank Pollard, budget letter
  "She had a strong personality and faced all the trials of her life with unswerving courage." Dictionary of Quaker Biography
1935-02-11 d. at her home, 18, Battlefield Road, St Albans, Hertfordshire National Probate Calendar; The Friend 93:154, 1935-02-15
1935-02-12

Heard to-day that Sophie died yesterday. It is very sad. Fortunately F. saw her last week. He had been going to stay with her, but went to Winifred & Eric’s as she wasn’t well. She was so devoted to F. & so proud of him, & really caught cold ‘hardening’ herself in going out in cold winds, so as to hear F. speak on the 8th or 9th.

diary of Mary S.W. Pollard
1935-02-14 bur. at Jordans, Buckinghamshire The Friend

Sophie’s funeral at Jordan’s. Beautiful day, & all very nice & simple. All the Sparkes’s looked ill, but were extremely nice . . . Harry & Mrs Darbyshire spoke in meeting house—he about how well Sophie had brought up her 4 boys, & so on. She was rather wonderful, & a good head of the family. I was very fond of her. Many people there.

diary of Mary S.W. Pollard
1935-03-03

I thought the occasion at Jordans a beautiful one: we were I am sure grateful to Harry, & to Mary Darbyshire for their moving & feeling words in the meeting house. My own mind goes back not only to Sophie's years of widowhood thus spoken of, but of my own childhood at Sale under her special care, & to early visits to Rochdale after her marriage. The wedding photograph by the bye is of wondrous interest!

Frank Pollard, budget letter
1935-04-12 will proved at Bristol by son Wilfrid Sparkes and Philip Henry Darbyshire; effects £5061 5s. 3d. National Probate Calendar


Lucy (Pollard) Jackson 02. Lucy Pollard

1856-01-22 b. Low Ackworth, Hemsworth, Yorkshire

Pollard book, Illustrated London News family record, both now at West Sussex RO; birth certificate

1861 scholar, of Rd leading to Carr Bridge, Low Ackworth, Yorkshire, living with her family, a house maid and a nurse maid TNA: PRO RG 9/3440 f25 p17
1865-70 of Ackworth, a pupil at Ackworth school Ackworth School Centenary Committee (1879) List of the Boys and Girls Admitted into Ackworth School 1779–1879
1871 scholar, pupil, of 65 High Street, St Michael, Lewes, Sussex PRO RG 10/1067 f32 p4
1874-08-01 "Lucy returns on 7th day to her duties at I.B. Edmundson's" . . . [possibly John Beeby Edmondson, railway ticket printer, of Manchester] letter from William Pollard to William Henry Pollard, 1874-07-30, privately held

1881

teacher (school), living with her family and a general servant at 9 Holmefield, Sale, Cheshire RG 11/3506 f107 p9
1887-05-18 of Oak Cottage, Eccles; m. Harrison Jackson (1863–1955) of Manchester, at Eccles Friends' Meeting House, near Manchester The Friend
Child: Hugo Harrison (1890–1918) National Probate Calendar; The Friend; The British Friend; Annual Monitor
1891 living with husband, son, and one general servant at Albert Estate, Bollin Ter., Wilmslow, Cheshire RG 12/2820 f13 p15
1894 of Whack House, Yeadon, near Leeds, Yorkshire Proceedings of the Ackworth Old Scholars' Association. Part XIII. Eighth Month, 1894
1901 living with family at 4 Windermere Rd, Kendal, Westmorland RG 13/4913 f65 p1
1904 of Green Close, Kendal; gave Frank and Mary Pollard a paper rack, for their wedding present Mary S.W. Pollard, list of wedding presents
1910 of 3 Green Close, Kendal Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, Annual Report 29
1911 with son in father-in-law's household, in 6 rooms at Harrop Brow Farm, Pott Shrigley, near Macclesfield, Cheshire RG14PN21455 RG78PN1277 RD444 SD2 ED8 SN47
1918 of 1 West Grove, Kendal, Westmorland The Friend; Commonwealth War Graves Commission website
1937 to 1939 of 51 St Paul’s Road, Weston-super-Mare National Probate Calendar; The Friend
1939-01-18

d. Weston-super-Mare

National Probate Calendar; The Friend 97:84, 1939-01-27
1939-03-07 will proved at Carlisle by husband Harrison Jackson; effects £648 16s. 3d. National Probate Calendar


03. Ellen Pollard

1857-08-14 b. Ackworth Pollard book, Illustrated London News family record, both now at West Sussex RO; GRO index; The Friend XV.177:171
1858-03-13 d. Ackworth Pollard book, Illustrated London News family record, both now at West Sussex RO; GRO index; The British Friend XVI.IV:108


Bedford Pollard 04. Bedford Pollard

1858-12-28 b. Ackworth. "In a house facing the school cupola at Ackworth, on December 28th, 1858, I first saw daylight." His name, Bedford, "signified my father̓s esteem for the great-hearted philanthropist." The Friend XVIII.194:38; GRO index; Bedford Pollard (1937) Quaker Reminiscences, London: Headley Brothers
1861 of Rd leading to Carr Bridge, Low Ackworth, Yorkshire, living with her family, a house maid and a nurse maid TNA: PRO RG 9/3440 f25 p17
1860s With his brothers, loved to play cricket in grounds of estate of Joseph Crosfield, row on the little lake, even bath in swimming bath; with father, drove in dogcart of James Payne to Ifield monthly meeting.

The Friend 94:553, 1936-06-12

 

At about seven years of age I was installed in the bottom class of the "three lower" as day scholar. The "three lower" classes gathered in one schoolroom under separate junior teachers and one experienced master.

Pollard (1937)
1866 Spring lodger at Walker’s, Ackworth school baker
1866 Summer

with family, moved to Reigate

Here a happy boyhood was spent with certain ups and downs owing to rude street boy enmities.

In the grounds of Joseph Crosfield, whose estate was quite near, we three brothers often disported ourselves at cricket, boating, and even bathing in their swimming bath. Herbert and Margaret, younger members of the family, frequently played cricket with us; sometimes even the graver older members joined in.

The South country afforded great scope for butterfly hunting. Reigate Hills were the home of many varieties and often did we three brothers wander there with our nets.

"For some time my brother Albert and I went to Miss Watson̓s dame school, where we did Kindergarten work."

1867 to Croydon school. "As a little boy of nine sobbing in the darkness in the first night of absence from home . . ."

One memory of school time is of the only occasion when I cheated. It was a spelling lesson and not being satisfied with the look of "rubarb ", I glanced at the next boy̓s slate and added the "h".

Pollard (1937); The Friend XLV:120–1
1868/1870 at Croydon School A Complete List of Scholars Educated at Croydon School from the Opening of the Establishment in 1825 to its Final Removal to Saffron Walden in 1879
Jan 1871 to Ackworth

My last touch with Croydon School was a Bible, which I still possess, a good deal the worse for wear. "Presented by the Friends̓ School, Croydon, to Bedford Pollard on the occasion of his becoming twelve years of age." That is on the fly-leaf in my handwriting. I think it was really intended as a leaving gift as only three or four weeks later, January ’71, my brother Albert and I were established at Ackworth.

The journey north was broken for a few days at Leamington. Having no longer a home at Reigate and not yet in Sale, I wrote in my copybook, "Bedford Pollard, Leamington."

The Friend XLV:120–1; Pollard (1937)
1871 to 1873 scholar, of Friends' School, Ackworth

Of the remaining few months of my school life at Ackworth I will not speak. Painful memories of harshness and injustice towards myself, of absurd exaggerations of trivial misdemeanours on the part of many others are better consigned to oblivion.

PRO RG 10/4642 f148 p11; Pollard (1937)
1872 to Henry Thomson’s school, Stramongate, Kendal, for a brief period The Friend
"Then came summer vacation and after a few weeks at home, I began my apprenticeship to the grocery trade at John Rowntree̓s, in Scarborough." Pollard (1937)
c. 1878 It was while I was in my ’teens that I first met my wife. She was a member of a Good Templar lodge in which her father, Henry Merry Cross, and several other prominent townsmen were to be seen.

"It was near the close ’78 that I left Scarborough and came to my home at Sale, and after helping in a Friend̓s grocery shop with their Christmas trade" . . .

1879 present at Ackworth School Centenary, as observer

Early in ’79 Quaker influence again came to my assistance. From a wholesale tea merchant I received a note: "Take thy apron to St. Mary̓s Gate on second day at 8 o̓clock. Wages 24s. a week. Do thy best."

For two and a half years I worked for the firm, being shortly advanced to the post of traveller, and much better wages.

 

The Friend LXVIII:102, 1929-02-01; GRO index; Pollard (1937)

1881 retail grocery traveller, living with family and a general servant at 9 Holmefield, Sale, Cheshire RG 11/3506 f107 p9
 

Quaker influence again took me up the ladder. My father sounded James Reckitt and I was called to Hull. A new campaign was projected by the firm and presently I was sent to Birmingham to work under their head representative in introducing their manufactures widely, and creating a demand that wholesale houses could not ignore. In various towns I made my temporary abode: Wolverhampton, Dudley, Burton, Hanley, Leicester; working the districts round, returning to Birmingham later to give further impetus to the trade.

 

Pollard (1937)
1885-08-26 m. Emily Adelaide Cross (1958–1955, d. of Henry M. Cross, of York), at St Olave's, York The Friend; The British Friend; York Herald, 1885-08-28

Somewhat of a rolling stone after two or three years under Reckitts, I went into partnership with a Friend, in Hanley. Here we built up a wholesale drysaltery and confectionery business. Friends were few in the Potteries, and scattered, and before long I drifted and attached myself to the Wesleyans. Always musically inclined, I joined the choir. Anxious to do useful work, I helped to foster the Band of Hope and associated myself with other social interests of the Chapel. A non-sectarian children̓s service organization was then in existence locally, and with my name on the plan I occasionally gave my services. In 1885, one August day, the 25th, I journeyed to Ackworth, where Frederick Andrews had offered me hospitality, and the following morning, in the company of my brothers, Albert, then a teacher, and Frank; a little scholar, we took the train to York, where Emily Adelaide Cross and I were united in holy matrimony at St. Olave̓s Church. After the customary festivities, amid showers of rice (it was before the days of confetti), we departed for a Welsh honeymoon.

Pollard (1937); Christabel Pollard visitors' book
1887-03-04 of 15 Brunswick Place, Hanley. . . . "succeeding somewhat uneventful years in Hanley" . . . The Friend XXVII Apr:93; Pollard (1937)
Children: Edith Madeline (1887–1959), Mabel Constance (1889–1895), Reginald Sidney (1890–1982), Hubert Eugene (1893–1979), Elsie Lilian (1894–1981), Florence Mary (1897–1966), Christabel (1899–1987) The Friend; GRO index; Pollard book
 

Once again I sought "fresh woods and pastures new". I negotiated the turning over of my share in the business to my partner, and in Acocks Green, five miles south of Birmingham, we lifted up our eyes. An old-fashioned house with a delightful garden filled with fruit trees, and, at that time, in a charming suburb—all promised well. All went well. Another baby arrived as time went on. I undertook an agency for a special tea in which a brother-in-law and some of my family were interested, and began looking out for a business. We heard eventually of a grocery concern in Scarborough and after a good deal of correspondence we migrated thither and for eight years I put my nose to the grocery grindstone.

My chief outside interests during this period were connected with the choral society of the town, and the Congregational Mutual Improvement Society.

Pollard (1937)
1888-03-31 partnership dissolved, between Bedford Pollard and William Henry Brown, trading as Pollard and Brown, at Hanley, wholesale confectioners and drysalters; Bedford Pollard retires The London Gazette, 1888-06-19; Birmingham Daily Post, 1888-06-20; Liverpool Mercury, 1888-06-21
1889 published The God of the Children; or, how the voices of nature speak to us BL catalogue
1890 of Moss side, Shirley road, Acocks Green, Birmingham Kelly's directory
1891 [1890] published Every-Day Miracles; well received by the Daily News, Glasgow Herald, and the Leeds Mercury, which said of it that "It is one of the best books of the kind which we have met, and a child must be dull or hard to please whose interest is not awakened by Mr. Pollard's lively and pleasant chapters." The Graphic considered it "A work worthy of the highest praise" . . . . BL catalogue; Freeman's Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser, 1890-09-23; Glasgow Herald, 1890-10-23; Leeds Mercury, 1890-10-27; Daily News, 1890-11-11; The Graphic, 1890-11-22
1891 grocer, living with wife, three children and one general servant at 11 North Street, Scarborough, Yorkshire RG 12/3965 f22 p40
1892-07-11 grocer, of North-street; his assistant charged with embezzling £1 8s. 8d. from him; the case was brought in the Police Court, but was dismissed as it was felt that it should have gone to the County Court for recovery of the sum concerned Yorkshire Herald, 1892-07-12
1893-05–09

‘For the Young. A Wonderful Lesson-Book’ published in The Friend II May:129–30, June:199–200, Sept:250–1; of Scarborough.

 
1893-10 to 1894-04 ‘For the Young. The Voyage of Ulysses’ published in two parts, first in The Friend, then in The British Friend.  
1894-05 ‘Spring Thoughts’ For the Young, published in The British Friend III:130, 158.  
1894-09 poem ‘Summer Morning near Dolgelly’ published in The British Friend III:269  
1895-04 poem ‘Flamborough in a Storm. A Reverie’ published in Friends’ Quarterly Examiner XXIX:188–92  
1895-11-30 of North Street, Scarborough Yorkshire Herald, 1895-11-30
1897

As formerly in Hanley, and in Manchester, my interest in Band of Hope work was maintained. In 1897 I was invited to act as conductor at the Band of Hope Festival in the Circus. This was a great annual event in those days. It was a formidable responsibility. With 500 little faces before me and a broad flood behind—a crowded audience—I must have felt in a limelight such as erstwhile Horatius in Macaulay̓s ballad.

Pollard (1937)
1898 [1897] published Elsie's Adventures in Fairyland; The Graphic found it "a tempting little book" BL catalogue; Morning Post, 1897-12-10; The Graphic, 1897-12-18
1898

In 1898 foolish speculation having crippled me, I came to an arrangement with my creditors (some time later I was able to clear off the balances, receiving many acknowledgments of surprise and congratulations), and my brother-in-law took over the business. Influence again came to my aid and in the spring of ’98 I entered the service of the Co-operative Wholesale Society in Manchester

Pollard (1937)
1898 to 1923 worked at CWS in Manchester The Friend
1898-07 poem ‘At the Grave Side’ published in Friends’ Quarterly Examiner XXXII: 322–324  
1899-08

The last comer into the family, a girl, was born soon after we came to Manchester, and although established at work our home was changed several times as years went by.

Pollard (1937)
1899-09  ‘Ackworth School: Reminiscences and Reflections’ published in The British Friend VIII:252–3  
1900 ‘Shakespeare as a Religious Teacher’ published in Friends’ Quarterly Examiner XXXIV:353–372  
1900-02 'The Story of Andromeda' published in Little Folks Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald, 1900-02-17
1901 wholesale grocery packer, living with family in 4 rooms at 23 Dundonald Road, Didsbury, Lancashire RG 13/3669 f39 p23
1901-10 ‘Schopenhauer and Pessimism’ published in Friends’ Quarterly Examiner XXXV: 525–534  
1901/1902 gave lecture at Ackworth School, on "The Humour of Shakespeare" Ackworth Old Scholars' Association Annual Report, 1902
1903-12-03 of Didsbury; ‘The Great Revival Mission in Manchester’ published in The Friend XLIII:773–4  
 

For some time we attended Didsbury, or Mount Street Meeting, although I had resigned my membership soon after marriage. Eventually, while in Didsbury, we applied for admission, with the family; quite an occasion.

A most distressing time did we pass through in Didsbury. An outbreak of small-pox in the neighbourhood caught one of our daughters, and for some weeks we were all in quarantine, the victim being removed to the small-pox hospital.

 
Pollard (1937)
1905-02-24 ‘The Old and the New Schoolmaster’ published in The Friend XLV:120–1  
 

After moving to Longsight I was drawn into the Adult School at West Gorton. These was a fine opening here— a working-class district—for Band of Hope and Sunday School, and for some years my chief interest was in those. From the adult side I was able to gather a choir, and many musical entertainments were given as time went on.

Pollard (1937)
1905-08-14 of Manchester; letter on a Friends’ hymn book published in The Friend XLV:558, 1905-08-25  
 

My taste for literary work one day found me a successful contributor to T.P.̓s Weekly, and forwarding this article to the C.W.S. Secretary, I appealed for a more congenial post. A few days later I was called out and transferred to the staff of the Wheatsheaf, a monthly journal issued in the interests of the co-operative movement. This contained sixteen pages of general co-operative interest dealing with the various factories and other co-operative and general features, to which retail societies added their own local matter. This became an important instrument of propaganda, eventually reaching a circulation of a million a month. This change over was in 1905 and at last I seemed to have settled down. After twenty-five years on this work, contributing and sub-editing, mostly passed in the Longsight printing works, I was retired on pension.

Pollard (1937)
1906 published Angel or Terror Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser, 1906-08-23
1906-02-09 letter on Earl Roberts’s Military Mission published in The Friend XLVI:92–3  
1906-10 ‘Old Conceptions and New’ published in Friends’ Quarterly Examiner XL:469–477  
1908-07-03 ‘The Great Demonstration at Heaton Park, Manchester’—pro Licensing Bill—published in The Friend XLIX:448–9  
1908-11-20 ‘At Swarthmore’ published in The Friend XLVIII:784–5  
1909-12-17 letter on ‘"The Unchristian Christmas"’ published in The Friend XLIX:859  
1909-12-31 letter on ‘"The Unchristian Christmas"’ published in The Friend XLIX:894  
1910-01 ‘A Pioneer in Bible Criticism’ published in Friends’ Quarterly Examiner XLIV:119–125  
1910-02-04 ‘The Twofold Call’—poem—published in The Friend NS I:79  
1910-06-10 letter on ‘An "Unanswered Query"’ published in The Friend I:396  
1910-08-05 letter on ‘Outward Signs of Mourning’ published in The Friend I:527  
1910-08-26 silver wedding announced in The Friend I:574  
1910-09-16 & 1910-09-23 ‘Tramps in an Old Quaker Country’ published in The Friend I:616–7, 663–4  
1911 not found in census; wife living with four children in 5 rooms at 14 Portland Rd, Longsight, Manchester RG14PN23776 RG78PN1378B RD464 SD2 ED75 SN314
1912-08-16 ‘The Isle of Mist and Shine’ published in The Friend LII:539–40  
1912-09-13 one of five Manchester Friends offering to arrange debates on various subjects The Friend LII:604
1913-12-12 covering letter by BP, on ‘Dublin Labour Troubles’, published in The Friend LIII:842  
1914

Then came the War, which made havoc of many stereotyped beliefs. I confess my own inability to view with calmness the invasion of Belgium, and shuddered to think, as I do still, of a world at the feet of Germany.

For two years I served as a volunteer special constable.

Pollard (1937)
1915-01-05 of 14 Portland Road, Slade Lane, Manchester son's FAU personnel card
1915-04 ‘The Drastic Medicine of War’ published in Friends’ Quarterly Examiner XLIX:193–200. He went so far as to declare: 'The Quaker doctrine of non-resistance will never find a sympathetic acceptance' and to praise acts of 'saintly service' carried out on battlefields and in military hospitals. 'And yet we decide that war is wicked, stupid and futile!' FQE & The Friend LV:339; Journal of the Friends Historical Society 62.1:72, 2010
1915-07-21 of 14 Portland Road, Manchester, S.E. son's FAU personnel card
1915-11-13 gave a lecture at the Baths Institute, Tamworth, under the auspices of the Educational Department of the Tamworth Industrial Co-operative Society, entitled "Through France to the Pyrenees" Tamworth Herald, 1915-11-20
1915 published article on 'Some Ancient Civilisations and Their Lessons' The Co-operative Wholesale Societies Limited Annual
1920-12-03 ‘Ten Days in Southern France’ published in The Friend LX:766–7  
1923-03-30 ‘To Barcelona and Mallorca’ published in The Friend LXIII:234–7  
1923-09-21 ‘Across Southern France: Atlantic to Mediterranean’ published in The Friend LXIII:734–5  
1923/1924 of 8 Derby road, Heaton Moor, Stockport, Cheshire Kelly's Directory 1923 & 1924
1924-04-04 letter on The Child Offender published in The Friend LXIV:292; from Heaton Moor, near Manchester  
1924-04-20 wrote letter from Heaton Moor The Friend LXIV:396, 1924-05-09
1924-07 ‘Quaker Standards’ published in Friends’ Quarterly Examiner LVIII:252–256  
1924-07-05 ‘Over the Somport Pass’ published in The Friend LXIV:650–1  
1924-09-26 ‘’Through the "Garden of France"’ published in The Friend LXIV:822–4  
1925-04-25 wrote letter from Manchester on ‘The Revised Book of Practice and the Drama.’ The Friend LXV:377, 1925-05-01
1925-07 ‘Memories of Ackworth Fifty Years Ago’ published in Friends’ Quarterly Examiner LIX:264–272  
1925-07-31 wrote letter from Heaton Moor on ‘Shakespeare and the Inner Light.’ The Friend LXV:704, 1925-08-07
1925-08-28 ‘The "Isle of Beauty"’ published in The Friend LXV:750–1  
1925-11-06 "Bedford's photos of Corsica, Orange, Genoa &c are very interesting." Frank Pollard, budget letter
1926 published Cleveland Hall. A Story of School Life, described as 'A Book for Boys' Cleveland Hall; BL catalogue
1926-01-15 letter from Heaton Moor, Stockport The Friend LXVI:57–8
1926-02-06 of Heaton Moor; "They have a fine variety of musical instruments [ . . . ] which provided a good after-supper performance." Frank Pollard, budget letter
1926-03-15 ‘Lyons, To-Day and Yesterday’ published in The Friend LXVI:195–6  
1926-09-10 ‘Through the Rhone Valley’ published in The Friend LXVI:808–9  
1926-09-10 wrote letter from Heaton Moor, on Miners’ Debts The Friend LXVI:835, 1926-09-27
1926-11-19 ‘The Inner Light. The Still Small Voice: Conscience’ published in The Friend LXVI:1040–1  
1926-12-24 letter published in The Friend LXVI:1186; from Heaton Moor  
1927-01-23 wrote letter from Heaton Moor The Friend LXVI:113, 1927-02-04
1927-08-26 ‘The Great World’s Altar Stairs’ published in The Friend LXVII:772–3  
1927-08-28 had recently had photo in the Manchester Guardian Frank Pollard, budget letter
1927-10-07 to 1927-10-21 ‘A Monthly Meeting in the Early Days’, based on manuscript of his father’s lecture, published in The Friend LXVII:903–4, 956–7  
1927-12-10 wrote letter from Heaton Moor The Friend LXVII:1184, 1927-12-23
1928-10-05 ‘Through the Riviera to Corsica’ published in The Friend LXVIII:884–5  
1929-02-01 letter from 8 Derby Road, Heaton Moor, near Manchester The Friend LXIX:102
1929-03-22 letter on disarmament The Friend LXIX:256–7
1929-06-07 wrote letter from Heaton Moor The Friend LXIX:576, 1929-06-21
1929-06-28 letter on religious intolerance The Friend LXIX:600
1929-08-09 ‘Vesuvius and Pompeii Visited’ published in The Friend LXIX:717–8  
1929-08-23 ‘Round about Sicily’ published in The Friend LXIX:761  
1930-11-24 gave a lantern lecture entitled 'Round about Vesuvius and Etna' at the Circus-street Hall, Nottingham, under the auspices of the Educational Department of the Nottingham Co-operative Society Nottingham Evening Post, 1930-11-25
1931-05-01 ‘"Legendary Virtue"’ published in The Friend LXXI:386. Refers to letters from Peter Bedford to William Pollard, in his possession  
1931-08-15 of Heaton Moor, Stockport; daughter’s wedding at Manchester. The Friend LXXI:784, 1931-08-21
1931-09-11 letter from Derby Road, Heaton Moor, Stockport, on ‘Meetings for Worship and the Ministry.’ The Friend LXXI:843
 

Previous to the War I had made one or two journeys abroad, chiefly to Paris and the Pyrenees. After that four years̓ breaks, devoted of necessity in holiday times to home scenes, every season found me a wanderer in foreign lands. Several times I explored the beauties of the Pyrenees, ranging from the Biarritz-San Sebastian end to the Canigou and Perpignan in the east. From here we (there were three of us on that occasion) creased the frontier to Barcelona and sailed thence to Palma in Mallorca. From the outset I have avoided popular resorts. Several times I have been through Switzerland, but only passed one night there, except in the train.

As years went by I explored Brittany and the Chateaux country, revelled in the beauties of Corsica and the Riviera, sailed up the Rhone and wandered in some of its ancient towns. Two summers found me in Italy; the second in company of a fellow Ackworth scholar, visiting Elba and Sardinia Capri and Sicily, en route. Another summer I came to Lisbon so picturesquely situated on its great river and journeyed through Portugal to Oporto, which included Cintra, Cascaes, Batalha, Leiria, Coimbra, Bussaco. Five thousand miles on a P. & O. cruiser included a recent scene of fighting, Ceuta, also Malta and Gibraltar. Belgium, with a peep at Holland, and lastly, Hamburg, and a wonderful Baltic tour including Denmark, Sweden and Finland, brought my Continental wanderings to an end, a serious illness undermining my health.

For many years I had issued a lecture syllabus of travel, and of literary subjects. Particularly in schools and colleges, the "Wit and Wisdom of Shakespeare" with slides and recitals, had been chosen; sometimes "The Boyhood of Shakespeare" as given from Manchester Broadcasting Station. Eventually I was recommended as a desirable member of the Royal Geographical Society and became a Fellow.

 

Pollard (1937)
1931-10 ‘The Boyhood of Shakespeare’ published in Friends’ Quarterly Examiner LXV: 368–376  
1931-10-06 "Professor Bedford Pollard" gave a lecture on 'How nations need one another', to the Burnham branch of the League of Nations [Union] Western Daily Press, 1931-10-07
1931-11-27

Bedford Pollard, F.R.G.S., of Manchester, has been on a Peace tour in the south and west, visiting Bristol, Burnham, Torquay, Bath and Weston-super-Mare. The title of his lecture was "How the nations need each other," illustrated by many slides. The attendances have been good, over 500 being present at Bristol. At all the meetings Peace literature was distributed, supplied in some cases by Friends’ Peace Committee. Bedford Pollard has travelled much on the Continent and enlivened his address by many personal touches where he had made friendly contact with village folk, . . .

The Friend LXXI:1081
1931 published sheet music for "I'm Grandpapa Old", words and music by himself sheet music in my possession
1932-02-12 gave a talk at Plymouth, entitled 'Among the Islands of the Mediterranean' Western Morning News, 1932-02-13
1932-02-26 ‘News (80 Years Old) of Our Schools’ published in The Friend LXXI:176–7  
1932-05-50 letter from Derby Road, Heaton Moor, Stockport, ‘A Roman Catholic View of Quakerism’, published in The Friend 90:435  
1933-03-26 to give lecture on ‘How Nations Need One Another’ at Morecambe Friends' meeting house The Friend 91:252, 1933-03-24
1933-09-08 ‘Some Famous Critics of Quakerism’ published in The Friend 91:772–3  
1934 of 8 Derby road, Heaton Moor, Stockport, Cheshire Kelly's Directory 1934
1934-01-12 letter from Derby Road, Heaton Moor, on ‘Lourdes’ The Friend 92:42–3
1934-04-13 ‘Nature’s Silences and Sounds’ published in The Friend 92:311  
1935-02-15 ‘Things Old and New’ published in The Friend 93:136  
 

During the editorship of Edward Reynolds, many of my illustrated travel articles appeared in the Friend. Over a long period numerous local papers and other weeklies have printed similar contributions. The Manchester City News and the Stockport Advertiser have given space to definite Quaker articles on George Fox and William Penn anniversaries. Years ago Little Folks contained numerous mythological and other stories from my pen. At intervals, as years passed, various books of mine were published, The God of the Children, Everyday Miracles, Elsie̓s Adventures, Cleveland Hall.

Pollard (1937)
1935-08-30 Golden wedding announced; of 8 Derby Road, Heaton Moor, Stockport The Friend 93:794
1936-01-31 letter from Heaton Moor, on co-operation, published in The Friend 94:104, 106  
1936-02-14 letter from Heaton Moor, on co-operation, published in The Friend 94:138–9  
1936-05-21 spoke at London Yearly Meeting, on temperance The Friend 94:497, 1936-05-29
1936-06-12 ‘Recollections of Reigate’ published in The Friend 94:553  
1936-07-31 letter from Derby Road, Heaton Moor, Stockport, on ‘"The Whispering Gallery"’, published in The Friend 94:726  
1936-10 ‘Croydon School in the Sixties’ published in Friends’ Quarterly Examiner LXX: 375–380  
1937-01-29 letter from Heaton Moor published in The Friend 95:107.  
1937-04-23 review of BP’s Quaker Reminiscences published in The Friend 95:374. For 25 years h had been sub-editor of the Wheatsheaf, the co-op magazine  
1937-10-15 ‘The Spirit of Thanksgiving’ published in The Friend 95:948–9  
1938-12-30 ‘Our Heritage’ published in The Friend 96:1168  
1939-01 ‘Dreamers and Visionaries’ published in Friends’ Quarterly Examiner LXXIII:74–79  
1943-04 Poem ‘The World’s Agony’ published in Friends’ Quarterly Examiner LXVII:90  
1944-01 Poem ‘To a Child’ published in Friends’ Quarterly Examiner LXXVIII:10  
1944-07 ‘Thoughts on Conscience’ published in Friends’ Quarterly Examiner LXXVIII:211–216  
1945-03-22 of 8 Derby-road, Heaton Moor, Stockport, Cheshire; d. at Heaton Moor, aged 86 The Friend 103:201, 1945-03-30; National Probate Calendar
1945-03-25 funeral diary of Mary S.W. Pollard
1945-04-13 obit. in The Friend 103:228. For some years worshipped with Wesleyans; rejoined Friends in Manchester. At 9, to Croydon School, then Ackworth & Stramongate. Apprenticed to John Rowntree’s grocery business at Scarborough. Joined CWS Manchester in 1898, where he stayed till he retired. Funeral at Ashton-on-Mersey. In addition to other books, had recently published People in Other Lands, a Traveller’s Tale.  
1945-05-25 will proved at Llandudno by Reginald Sidney Pollard and Hubert Eugene Pollard; effects £1783 7s. 2d. National Probate Calendar


Albert Pollard 05. Albert Pollard, BA

1860-11-29 b. Ackworth, Yorkshire Bootham School Register; Pollard book; GRO index
1861 of Rd leading to Carr Bridge, Low Ackworth, Yorkshire, living with her family, a house maid and a nurse maid TNA: PRO RG 9/3440 f25 p17
  "For some time my brother Albert and I went to Miss Watson̓s dame school, where we did Kindergarten work."

Bedford Pollard (1937) Quaker Reminiscences, London: Headley Brothers

1871-01 to Ackworth school. There till 1876. Usual residence Sale, Cheshire Pollard (1937); Ackworth School Centenary Committee (1879) List of the Boys and Girls Admitted into Ackworth School 1779–1879
1871 scholar, of Friends' School, Ackworth PRO RG 10/4642 f148 p11
  capt. Ackworth football XI Edgar B. Collinson, ed. (1935) Bootham School Register
1876 to 1877 at Bootham

Bootham School Register

  at Bootham, "the most remarkable sporting feat was probably that of Albert Pollard, a former headmaster of Penketh, who once took six Badsworth wickets in six consecutive balls." The Friend 93:1025, 1935-11-08
1877 to 1878, and 1879 to 1880 at Flounders Institute, Ackworth Joseph Spence Hodgson (1895) Superintendents, teachers, and principal officers of Ackworth School, from 1779 to 1893. Ackworth Old Scholars' Association
1878-08 came 9th in BA (Hons) degree, U. of London, with £5 prize. Had studied at Dalton Hall, Manchester The Friend XVIII Aug:222; Bootham School Register
  after graduation, spent two years working at science on a free and independent basis at University College, London Collinson, ed. (1935)
1878 to 1882 apprentice, Ackworth School Hodgson (1895)
1879 in group photo of Ackworth staff at Centenary The Friend LXIX:590, 1929-06-28
1881 teacher/schoolmaster, of Friends' School, Ackworth RG 11/4597 f116 p1
1885 to 1892 master, Ackworth School Hodgson (1895)
1885-08-26 accompanied his brother Bedford at his wedding at York; teacher Pollard (1937)
 

At that time Albert Pollard was an "apprentice" and later returned as Science Master. Janet Wallis was warned against "her friendship with that very dangerous young man," but undaunted they became engaged and were married in 1889.

Ackworth Old Scholars' Association Annual Report 62 (1943-4)
1889 on the opening of the new laboratory at Ackworth, became the first full science teacher DQB
1889-07-04 married Jane Hallaway Wallis (1863–1942), eldest daughter of William G. Wallis, of Risehow, Maryport, at Cockermouth Friends' meeting house The Friend; The British Friend XLVII Aug ads:8; GRO index; Pollard book
1891 science teacher, visitor with Edward Brady and family at 2 Victoria Road, Barnsley, West Riding of Yorkshire; "away for a day or two" RG 12/3772 f71 p21; RG 12/3765 f11 p14
 

Shortly after their marriage Albert Pollard was appointed Headmaster of Penketh School and, together he and his wife tried educational experiments and gathered round them a loyal staff, many of whom are well-known at Ackworth [ . . . ] The Pollards won the respect and affection of boys and girls and though some Committee members were at times a little afraid of how far their progressive Headmaster would go, they eventually had complete confidence in him.

AOSA Annual Report 62 (1943-4)
1892 to 1901 superintendent, Friends' School, Penketh, Lancashire The Friend; The British Friend; Hodgson (1895)
1893-08

Penketh School.

Considerable improvement has recently been made in the Accommodation of this Institution.

There are a few vacancies for the children of Friends, or of those who attend our Meetings, but are not in membership.

The Committee invite Applications, especially on the girls’ side.

Apply—Albert Pollard, B.A., Penketh School, near Warrington.

The British Friend II Aug: Ads 3
1893-12-14 co-executor of his father's will National Probate Calendar
1894 of Penketh school, near Warrington Proceedings of the Ackworth Old Scholars' Association. Part XIII. Eighth Month, 1894
1896-05-22 letter on ‘Young Friends and Our Principles’ published in The Friend XXXVI:332  
1896 summer spent two months at Colwyn Bay (given respite from school duties), "recruiting after a serious illness"—a severe complication of pneumonia and pleurisy AOSA Annual Report 1903; Joseph Spence Hodgson (1907) A History of Penketh School, pp. 148-167
1898-01-12 to 1898-01-14

gave paper on ‘The Place of Science in the School Curriculum’ at Friends’ Guild of Teachers meeting at Birmingham

The British Friend VII Feb:34
1899 summer

Oh the Sunday I was at home at Ackworth (before the Summer School), Albert was there, and gave the school such a splendid talk at the evening reading on privileges and responsibilities—I seldom heard any thing of the kind better. He wound up with that grand old story about Henry IV of France and Crillon—‘Go and hang yourself, Brave Crillon, we have won the fight, and you were not there’.

letter from Frank Pollard to Mary Spence Watson
1901-01-11 ‘Penketh School. Albert and Janet Pollard’s retirement.’—¾ page, with much detail on AP at Penketh The Friend XLI:28
1901 schoolmaster (out of employment), with his wife, boarder with Robert Coultard, farmer, at Brush Farm, Worton, Yorkshire RG 13/4605 f27 p13
 

. . . resigned his post at Penketh to take up the First Class Mastership at Ackworth, but fell ill before he started there and died in 1902, after two years of illness.

AOSA Annual Report 62 (1943-4)
1902-05-09 of Ackworth, Yorkshire; d. of consumption at Grange-over-Sands, in his 42nd year. He had been about to be appointed first-class teacher at Ackworth. The Friend XLII:318, The British Friend XI June:152; Pollard (1937); National Probate Calendar; Hodgson (1907); In Memoriam card
1902-05-12T16:00 bur. Ackworth fbg A History of Penketh School, pp. 148-167; In Memoriam card
1902-06 obit. published in The British Friend XI Jun:135–6  
 

ALBERT POLLARD (scholar, 1871-6), son of William and Lucy Pollard, née Binns (scholar, 1839-45), was born at Ackworth, 29th Eleventh Month, 1860. After leaving Ackworth, he spent a year at Bootham, York, and a year at the Flounders Institute, Ackworth, for he had chosen the profession of a teacher from the first. He was apprenticed at Ackworth from 1878-82, and passed on to the Dalton Hall, Manchester, from which place he graduated as B.A. of London University, and afterwards spent two years working at science on free and independent lines at University College, London. He returned to Ackworth in 1885 as teacher of the fourth class. On the opening of the new laboratory in 1889 he became the first full science teacher.

In 1889 he married Jane Hallaway Wallis, eldest daughter of the late William Gray Wallis, of Maryport, and music mistress at Ackworth 1885-8, and again, after she had gone to reside in the village, until 1892.

Not only was Albert Pollard thorough and methodical in his science teaching, for which he had a special gift, but in school games he was equally clever. In the List of Ackworth Teachers, etc, it is said of him, "In cricket he was from 1878 to 1883 the best slow bowler in the School eleven or even in the district. He frequently bowled unchanged throughout an innings. He practically introduced the art of 'breaking' into Ackworth bowling," and as a further illustration may be noted the phenomenal achievement at a match against Badsworth, of taking six of the opponents' wickets in six successive balls.

In 1893 he became Superintendent of the Friends' School, at Penketh, near Warrington, which accommodates 50 boys and 30 girls, his wife taking the office of mistress of the family. Here it was that Albert Pollard did his best because most experienced work, and where he had full scope to carry out his great idea of the building up of character. To further this aim it was his constant care that the class work should be carried on by the best and latest approved methods. He kept a lookout for improvements in teaching music, drawing, French, and handicrafts, and athletics, in the widening influence of games by enlarging the area of the cricket field, and the playground, and the gymnasium.

Albert Pollard's health broke down under the strain of work and responsibility, and he only recovered from a very severe attack of pneumonia by his own unconquerable will. Yet still he worked on with reduced power for four years; desiring a life of less responsibility, one in which he could exercise the art of teaching alone. On the death of Albert Linney, at Ackworth, an opening seemed made for his long cherished wish of being first class master at Ackworth, but though he was chosen to fill the post he was not privileged to take it up, for signs of consumption alarmingly showed themselves, which obliged him to resign the position.

All possible means were tried by open-air life on the Sussex Downs, and in Wensleydale, and lastly at Grange-over-Sands; yet all proved unavailing.

"So passed the strong heroic soul away," ere the full meridian was reached at the age of forty-two on the 9th of Fifth Month, 1902. He was buried, by his own request, in his own native village of Ackworth, near the School he loved so well, and there amid the "fitful sunshine and sudden shower" of that spring afternoon were gathered round him a solemn living circle of those that held him dear.

AOSA Annual Report 18 (1902)
1902-06

ALBERT POLLARD

(Communicated).

We have lost a strong soul from amongst us. There were many outside his immediate circle to whom the news of the death of Albert Pollard brought a keen sense of personal loss; many who felt that a light had gone out of their lives with the withdrawal of his joyous and radian presence. We do not feel so much that he has entered into rest, as that he has been transferred to a higher sphere of service, for no idea of weariness could ever be connected with him. "Languor was not in his heart," or weakness in his word. He seemed to be one of those born to encourage the waverer and refresh the outworn.

Upon the incidents of his life there is little need to dwell at length. The son of the lat William Pollard, he was born in 1860. He was educated at Ackworth and Bootham, proceeding in due course to the Flounders Institute and Dalton Hall, for the profession of teaching was his choice from the first. From the latter place he graduated as B.A. of London, and afterwards spent two years working at science on free and independent lines at University College, London. Meanwhile, between his studying times he had put in some years as an apprentice at Ackworth, to which place he returned in 1885, as Science Master and Teacher of the Fourth Class. In 1892 he was appointed to the Headmastership of Penketh School, and held that post until 1900. In that year through the death of Albert Linney a vacancy occurred in the highest form at Ackworth. To teach that class had always been a cherished ambition with Albert Pollard, and with that unconventionality which was one of his especial characteristics he resigned the headship of Penketh, in order that he might give his whole time and energies to the work of teaching, which was his heart's first love.

But before this plan could take effect his health broke down. A severe attack of pneumonia a few years previously had sapped his strength, and now signs of consumption showed themselves. All possible means were employed to combat the disease, and for a time it seemed as if its ravages were stayed and that we might still have kept him with us. But this was not to be, and on the 10th of this month the Home call came. The last winter had been spent at Grange-over-Sands, but by his own wish the funeral took place at Ackworth; and there, in the fitful sunshine and sudden shower of a Spring afternoon, he was committed to earth surrounded by a large company of relatives, friends, scholars, fellow students, those who had served with him and those who had served under him, all alike eager to show their love and loyalty and deep sorrow. Strong and earnest words were spoken in loving appreciation of him who had left us, emphasising his especially fearless whole-hearted determination to follow the truth wherever it should lead him; and his steadfast faith that he would see "his Pilot face to face when he had crossed the bar."

In 1889 Albert Pollard married Jane H. Wallis of Maryport, who proved herself a true helpmeet to him in all his works and ideals. They had no children. It is not easy to make any estimate of his character, especially thus early, while our hearts are sore with a sense of loss, and moreover while the charm of his sunny temper and the mirthful tones of his voice, and his ringing laugh, as he told a good story or poked fun at all and sundry, are still fresh in our memories. It was at Penketh perhaps that his best, because his ripest, work was done, and here his wife's name is associated with his in a singularly happy and successful term of service. A. Pollard's, teaching was arousing and truly educative in its character; he had made a thorough study of the art, and took every opportunity of improving the working of the School wherever weakness seemed shown, or where speculation in new methods promised increased success. In this way the School work seemed always pulsating with healthy vigour. He would freely give his scanty leisure to take the children on natural history excursions, and would spend hours in helping them with their collections. He would encourage them in the love for good reading, in the formation of libraries of their own, in the taking up of hobbies, etc. "Mr. Pollard was the only one who ever spoke to me who made me wish to do right," says one. "Personally I owe everything that is good in me to his influence," says another. A well known Friend, an expert in educational matters, writes: "I regard the death of Albert Pollard as a great blow to his profession. He undoubtedly took a much higher view of it and saw its possibilities with a clearer intelligence than most of us; and we looked to a time when, having matured and wrought into form his accumulated thought on educational subjects, he would become the instrument of a distinct elevation of the attitude of Friends to their Schools and of teachers to their service."

Space will only allow of the most cursory and inadequate allusion to the highest part of his work, the training of character and the fostering of the spiritual life in those under his care. His addresses in Meeting and on other occasions were fresh, suggestive and powerful. Children and teachers alike felt them to be inspiring and helpful in no ordinary degree. Having gained, now without effort and struggle, a firm foothold, we may surely believe that "to him it was given, many to save with himself." A few words from his farewell address to the Penketh scholars shall conclude this short notice: "The greatest fact of your lives is that the infinite God dwells within you, and dwelling there He breathes into your hearts longings and aspirations which only infinite goodness can satisfy. . . Nothing but the service of the infinite God can satisfy the infinite soul of man."

The British Friend, 1902-06
1902-07-10 will proved at London by Jane Hallaway Pollard, widow; effects £1824 10s. 5d. National Probate Calendar
1903 Albert Pollard's collected Essays on Education & Life were printed for private circulation Albert Pollard (1903) Essays on Education & Life
  see also the chapter 'Albert Pollard, B.A.', in Joseph Spence Hodgson (1907) A History of Penketh School A History of Penketh School, pp. 148-167

 


William Henry Pollard 06. William Henry Pollard (Revd William Henry Pollard, Father Pollard, Will)

1862-11-03 b. Ackworth The Friend 1862-12-01:309; GRO index; Bootham School Register
1871 of Holmesdale Rd, Reigate, Surrey, living with family and a general servant TNA: PRO RG 10/830 f83 p19
1874 to 1878 at Ackworth School; usual residence Sale, Cheshire Ackworth School Centenary Committee (1879) List of the Boys and Girls Admitted into Ackworth School 1779–1879; Joseph Spence Hodgson (1895) Superintendents, teachers, and principal officers of Ackworth School, from 1779 to 1893. Ackworth Old Scholars' Association
shortly after 1874-08-03 received a letter from his father:

My very dear Boy,

We were glad to find that thou hadst reached thy destination at last & we have been since often picturing thee at thy work, which I have no doubt seems very strange & novel to thee. But this will be soon got over & things will become easy & natural, as thou perseveres & does thy best—We shall hope to hear in a few days, a little account of thy first week's experience in learning business. I suppose thou wilt write on 1st day—

. . .

Thou mayst be sure, my dear boy, we are often thinking of thee, & often pray for thee that thou mayst be strengthened to do what is right in all respects, & to persevere in those good resolutions recently renewed. Remember thou hast had lately a gracious Visitation of Heavenly love to thy soul, & be very careful to cherish it & obey the light that has been granted, & then more will be given. We are looking forward with bright hopes to thy future career as a Christian disciple, & pray that nothing may be suffered to hinder the Lord's work—Be very watchful in all things to keep a tender conscience & to do what is right without being watched & told; & the only way to keep a tender conscience is to obey conscience, & to keep up a regular plan of praying to thy Heavenly Father. Don't miss prayer on any account. Keep cheerful & hopeful, & never join in with any grumbling. Guard thy conversation & neither talk nor think anything thou would be ashamed for us to know. Try & be gentle & courteous in thy way of speaking, & try to overcome thy shyness & reserve. Be punctual. This will require an effort. Thou wilt have many difficulties, but there is no need to be discouraged. I have no doubt thou wilt succeed if thou keeps a good heart. Read this letter over 2 or 3 times.

Give our united dear love to cousin John & Eliza & believe me as ever Thy very affectionate papa.

letter from William Pollard to William Henry Pollard, privately held
1878 to 1879 at Bootham School, York Bootham School Register
1800 to 1881 at Flounders Institute, Ackworth Hodgson (1895); The Friend
1881 student, Flounders Institute, Ackworth PRO RG 11/4595 f35 p1
1881-08 of Flounders College. Gained First B.A., First Division, University of London The Friend XXI Sept:262; Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser, 1881-08-01
1884 BA, First Division Bootham School Register; Leeds Mercury, 1884-11-17
  junior teacher at Ackworth Edgar B. Collinson, ed. (1935) Bootham School Register
1885-01 of Dalton Hall, Owens College, Manchester. London U. B.A., 1st Division The Friend XXV.291:24
1886-07 ‘Lausanne: The View from the Beacon’ published in Friends’ Quarterly Examiner XX:447–450—had visited in January  
1888-09 ‘Socrates and Ruskin on State Economy’ published in Friends’ Quarterly Examiner XXII:584–590  
1890-04 ‘Browning and His Critics’ published in Friends’ Quarterly Examiner XXIV: 190–201  
1890

. . . master at Saffron Walden School until 1890, when he left and became a Roman Catholic. This was followed by a year as a master at a Catholic School in St. Paul, Minn. U.S.A—returning to Rugby, England, to teach in a Catholic House of the Rosminian Order. Then for 3 years as a Novice at Wadhurst, Kent, followed by 3 more at the Headquarters of the Order at Domo d'Ossola, Italy [ . . . ]. Novices studying for the R.C. priesthood had a strenuous time, and in his 3 years in Italy, Uncle Will had to attend lectures in Italian and take notes in Latin.

Ms notes on the family of William and Lucy Pollard, probably by Wilfred Sparkes; Collinson, ed. (1935)
1891 not found in census  
1892-03 ‘Neglected Standard Works. Sir Thomas More’s "Utopia"’ published in The British Friend NS I Mar:66–7  
1892-04 ‘Neglected Standard Works. Butler’s Analogy’ published in The British Friend NS I Apr:78–9; ‘The Divine Mystery’ published in Friends’ Quarterly Examiner 209–16  
1892-05-05

Friends' School

Saffron Walden

5th May, 1892.

 

Dear Sophie & Jo

                             I am writing to you, and to the other members of the family, to announce that I am probably leaving Walden next week; I think, on the Saturday. If you can get that week's budget to me by that time, well and good; if not, you'd better send direct to Emma, as I don't know where I shall be.

   I don't think it will surprise you very much to learn for certain what my intentions are. It is about a couple of years, I suppose, since I somewhat suddenly woke up to the fact that I was drifting towards the Catholic Church. That prospect, at first dreadful and apparently impossible, has since gradually become to me the whole hope and aim of my life. What the Church seems to me I can't tell you now, but there's all my lifetime to tell you in; how completely and incorruptibly She is the everlasting Bride of God, the Temple of the Holy Ghost. It would be wrong to say this is my opinion; I am so confident of its truth that I think I would die for it; for better for worse, I have submitted my whole soul to Her. My perpetual astonishment has come to be that none of my friends can see Her in all Her beauty and tenderness and wisdom, "the fulness of Him that filleth all in all".

—I know a thousand objections that leap to your lips. Believe me, I'm not going to buy pardon of sins, or to adore the Virgin Mary, or to think that baptism ensures salvation, or to advocate burning of heretics, or to say that all Quakers will go to Hell, or to believe that "dead works" have a merit of their own, or to put anyone between myself & God; all these things no Catholic does or can do.—Then again I am prepared to be blamed on all hands for precipitation. I think I have not been precipitate; no one but me knows what long weary hopeless months I have passed, or how slowly I have come to each conclusion. But now, I am sure; and that means that it would be a deadly sin for me to wait here longer.

Of course I have written to, and talked with, a priest,—a most delightful gentleman and scholar in Cambridge; and through his means I hope to enter the haven where I would be, probably on Sunday the 15th. I hope—in an obscure sort of way—that I shall after that spend a little time in some Catholic place to get a little initiated into my new duties.

   I need not say, surely, how dreadful the act of parting spiritually with all my dearest ones is to me; sometimes almost too dreadful to bear. But Quakerism is to me the City of Destruction; so what avails it to consider that side.

   Confident that you will sympathize with me in what you must see to be a somewhat trying time, I remain

                                       Yr loving brother

                                                                    W.H. Pollard.

 

letter to sister, in my possession
c. 1892-09 of St Thomas Seminary, (Catholic College), St Paul, Minnesota, USA Collinson, ed. (1935); Pollard budget letter, note by Arthur B. Pollard
1892

[He] began his teaching at Ackworth and [ . . . ] obtained his B.A. degree; later, a master at Saffron Walden. Here, to my father̓'s grief but his own spiritual gain, he became a convinced Roman Catholic and resigned post and membership. He would, he declared, have lapsed into agnosticism, had he not found this way out.

Bedford Pollard (1937) Quaker Reminiscences, London: Headley Brothers
1893-07 ‘Neglected Standard Works. No. 3—Crabbe’s Poems’ published in The British Friend NS II July:201–2  
1893-11 ‘Thomas a Kempis’ published in The British Friend NS II Nov:304–5  
1894 of St Maries', Rugby Proceedings of the Ackworth Old Scholars' Association. Part XIII. Eighth Month, 1894; Collinson, ed. (1935)
  member of Order of Institute of Clergy (Rosminian) Collinson, ed. (1935)
1894-08 ‘Keble as a Poet’ published in The British Friend III:232–4  
1895-10 ‘Bacon’s Essays’ published in The British Friend IV:259–61  
1896-05 ‘Young’s Night Thoughts’ published in The British Friend V May:104–6  
1897-02 ‘Dr. Johnson’ published in The British Friend VI Feb:36–8  
1901 not found in census  
1901 ordained at Ratcliffe College, Leicester Ms notes on the family of William and Lucy Pollard
1901 at Monte Calvasio, Domodossola Collinson, ed. (1935)
  "After various experiences in Catholic institutions in America and Italy, he was for some years practically headmaster of a Catholic College near Leicester." Pollard (1937)
1904-08-03 As 'Father Pollard', present at his brother’s wedding in Newcastle RSW Cuttings, Vol. 6
1904 of Ratcliffe College, Leicester; gave Frank and Mary Pollard The Invitation, for their wedding present Mary S.W. Pollard, list of wedding presents
1905/1917 master at Ratcliffe College Leicester Collinson, ed. (1935)
1910 of Post Office, Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, Annual Report 29
1911 not found in census  
  ordained as priest Collinson, ed. (1935)
1917/1919 at Rugby and assistant priest at Wadhurst
  was later given a church at Bexhill-on-Sea Ms notes on the family of William and Lucy Pollard; Edgar B. Collinson, ed. (1935) Bootham School Register
1919/1923 superior of Church of St Mary Magdalen, Bexhill-on-Sea Collinson, ed. (1935)
1923-10-25 d. suddenly, in his 61st year, at Crowhurst, Sussex; of the Catholic Presbytery, Bexhill-on-Sea National Probate Calendar; The Friend LXIII:876, 1923-11-02; GRO index
 

Finally, as chief priest at Bexhill-on-Sea, he died suddenly to the great distress of all his associates, and of his surviving brothers and sisters, by whom he was greatly beloved.

Pollard (1937)
1923-12-04 will proved at Lewes by Revd William Trevor Hughes; effects £777 6s. 6d. National Probate Calendar


Eliza (Pollard) Irwin 07. Eliza Pollard (Lillie)*

1866-07-15 b. Reigate, Surrey The Friend VI.69:203; The British Friend XXIV.9:236; GRO index
1871 of Holmesdale Rd, Reigate, living with family and a general servant TNA: PRO RG 10/830 f83 p19
1877 to 1879 at Ackworth School; usual residence Sale, Cheshire Ackworth School Centenary Committee (1879) List of the Boys and Girls Admitted into Ackworth School 1779–1879; Ackworth Old Scholars' Association Report No. 58 (1940)
  had to leave Ackworth early on account of a serious illness AOSA Report (1940)
1881 scholar, living with family and a general servant at 9 Holmefield, Sale, Cheshire RG 11/3506 f107 p9
1881-08 to 1883-06 at The Mount School, York The Mount School, York. List of Teachers and Scholars 1784–1816, 1831–1906 (1906) York: Sessions; H. Winifred Sturge, ed. (n.d.: 1932) A Register of Old Scholars of the Mount School York, 1931–1932, Leominster: Orphans’ Printing Press; AOSA Report (1940)
1883 to 1888 living with her parents at Eccles, near Manchester, where she was actively engaged in Sunday School and Band of Hope work AOSA Report (1940)
1889-05-15 of Oak Cottage, Eccles; m. John Thomas Irwin (1862–1936, chemist, of Church, near Accrington), younger son of Richard Irwin, of The Grange, Crumpsall, Manchester, at Eccles Friends' meeting house National Probate Calendar; The British Friend XLVII June ads:8; Bootham School Register; GRO index; AOSA Reports; British Army WWI pension records
Children: Cuthbert (1890–1971), Wilfred (1891–1956), Christine (1892 – after 1960), Hilda Mary  (1897–1984), Raymond (1902–1976), unnamed daughter (1906–1906); eldest b. Church, Lancashire, all other births registered in Huddersfield RD The Friend; The British Friend; Bootham School Register; H. Winifred Sturge, ed. (n.d.: 1932); GRO index; PRO RG14PN21712 RG78PN1293 RD447 SD4 ED10 SN107
1890-02-11 of Laurel Bank, Church, Lancashire The Friend XXX Mar:77; The British Friend XLVIII Mar:72
1890-10-20 of Holmfirth; removed from Preston MM Holmfirth membership register
1891 living with husband, son, and one general servant at Horsfield House, Cartworth, Holmfirth, West Riding of Yorkshire RG 12/3558 f32 p2
1891 and 1892 of Horsfield House, Holmfirth The Friend XXXI Oct:275, The British Friend XLIX Oct:257, II Jan:26
1897 of The Hays, Thongsbridge, Yorkshire West Yorkshire Archive Service C786//2/B/2
1897-09-13 resigned from the Society of Friends Holmfirth membership register
1898 of Heaton Road, Huddersfield parish register, Holy Trinity, Huddersfield
1901 living with family and a domestic servant at 6 Heaton Rd, Huddersfield, Yorkshire RG 13/4105 f125 p13
  with her children, left Friends while resident in the Huddersfield district and joined the Church of England AOSA Report (1940)
1902-04-23 of Glen View, Heaton Road, Huddersfield parish register, Holy Trinity, Huddersfield
1904 of Thursby, Carlisle; gave Frank & Mary Pollard 2 eiderdowns, for their wedding present Mary S.W. Pollard, list of wedding presents
1905 of Thursby, near Carlisle Ackworth Old Scholars' Association. Report No. 24 (1905) London & Ashford: Headley Bros
1911 living with husband (manager of a chemical manufacturing company), three children, and a housemaid, in an 11-room house at Cledford Lane, Kinderton, near Middlewich, Cheshire RG14PN21712 RG78PN1293 RD447 SD4 ED10 SN107
1915-07-16 of Bonshaw, Minehead, Somerset British Army WWI pension records
  her husband was engaged in the manufacturer of explosives, which necessitated much moving about the country as he took charge of different establishments, so that she lived at Holmfirth, Thongs Bridge, Huddersfield, Thursby, Minehead, Cockermouth and finally at Maryport AOSA Report (1940)
1932 of North Howe, Maryport, Cumberland Sturge (1932)
1932-05-26 sympathy expressed for "their anxiety & uncertainty"—not clear what this refers to Frank Pollard, budget letter
1933-05-23 "I hope Lillie's arm is well on the way to recovery, & will be a thing of the past when this reaches her: they must have had a fine time in Scotland." Frank Pollard, budget letter
1936-05-11

. . . to Maryport, not a very attractive little town, & John & Lily’s house, tho’ large, is not pretty . . . First time we have stayed with J. & L. Cuthbert & Ruth came in later. Lily has been ill, & little Chris’s death upset her greatly, but she is better. Both she & John are very deaf—J. uses a trumpet always. He is so interesting.

diary of Mary S.W. Pollard
1936-09-10 had recently moved house Frank Pollard, budget letter
1938-10-06 of Thaneville, Maryport, Cumberland; d. Cockermouth RD National Probate Calendar [as Elizabeth Irwin]; GRO index; Pollard Book
1938-11-14 administration granted at Carlisle to son Cuthbert Irwin; effects £248 19s. 4d. National Probate Calendar


Constance Pollard 08. Constance Pollard

1867-12-05 b. Reigate, Surrey The British Friend XXVI.2:50; GRO index
1871 of Holmesdale Rd, Reigate, living with family and a general servant TNA: PRO RG 10/830 f83 p19
1871-06-13 d. at Reigate The Friend XI July:184; GRO index; Annual Monitor
 

At Reigate, Constance, the beloved child of William and Lucy Pollard, aged 3½ years. "He gathereth the lambs in his arms, and carrieth them in his bosom."

The Friend XI July:184

"Of such is the kingdom of heaven."

The British Friend


Arthur Binns Pollard 09. Arthur Binns Pollard

1870-06-02 b. Reigate, Surrey The Friend X.Aug:205; GRO index; TNA: PRO RG 10/830 f83 p19
1871 of Holmesdale Rd, Reigate, living with family and a general servant PRO RG 10/830 f83 p19
1881 scholar, living with family and a general servant at 9 Holmefield, Sale, Cheshire RG 11/3506 f107 p9
1881 to 1885 at Ackworth School; usual residence Sale Ackworth School Centenary Committee (1879) List of the Boys and Girls Admitted into Ackworth School 1779-1879
after 1885 sent to Manchester Technical School and Queen's College, Manchester Dictionary of Quaker Biography
1887 apprenticed to Rowntree, Hill, & Co. of York one of the Sparkes brothers, Ms notes on the family of William and Lucy Pollard
1889/1910 engaged in grocery & tea business in Manchester, Leigh-on-Sea, and Kendal Ms notes on the family of William and Lucy Pollard
1891 tea merchant’s assistant, employed, living with his mother at Drayton Lodge, Barton upon Irwell, Eccles, Lancashire RG 12/3153 f43 p32
1894 of 22 Clarendon Road, Eccles, Manchester Proceedings of the Ackworth Old Scholars' Association. Part XIII. Eighth Month, 1894
  in Eccles, was engaged in Band of Hope and Sunday School work at Byrom Street, Manchester, where he met Edith Anne Jackson DQB
1896-04-02 tea dealer; m. Edith Anne Jackson (1867–1961), daughter of William Jackson of Manchester, at Eccles Friends' meeting house The Friend XXXVI:254, 1896-04-17, 119:1556, 1961-11-24; The British Friend V May:122; Pollard book; DQB; information from Colin Stirling
Children: Elsie (1897–1993), Ernest Binns (1899–1982), Philip Renshaw (1899–1899), Hubert Arthur (1901–1972), Lucy (1903–2001), William (1904–1964) The Friend; The British Friend; GRO index
  At Eccles, became interested in temperance—joined Friends Juvenile Temperance Society, then worked for Band of Hope and Sunday School at Byrom Street, Manchester The Friend 107:933, 1949-11-18
1897-05-27 of 3 Brighton Avenue, Flixton The British Friend VI June:180
1898-11-28 of 2 Brogden Grove, Brooklands, near Manchester; wrote to The Friend on ‘Friends and Ritualism.’ The Friend XXXVIII:822, 1898-12-16
c. 1899 became a grocer at Leigh DQB
1899 of High Street, Leigh-on-Sea, Essex The Friend XXXIX:1899-02-24, XXXIX:578; The British Friend VIII Mar:52, VIII Sept:258
1901-02-26 of 2 Gladstone Road, Urmston The Friend XLI:160, The British Friend X Apr:96
1901 not found in census  
1903-01-04 of 1 Lever Street, Flixton, near Manchester The Friend XLIII:48
  cashier at Flixton DQB
1903 tea merchant at Kendal; finally settled down as a grocer
1904 of 10 Ferney Green, Kendal; with wife, gave Frank & Mary Pollard a biscuit box, for their wedding present Mary S.W. Pollard, list of wedding presents
1905-01 of Littlemire, Skelsmergh, Kendal The Friend XLV:48, 1905-01-20, The British Friend XIV Jan:30
1907-01-22

Arthur’s folks have all had influenza and now Arthur has it. To-day’s report is that "his cough is bad & as his pulse is verylow" the Dr. says "he must not get up at all yet, as it is in the reaction after the fever in Influenza that people go about & then follows Pneumonia." So evidently he has a wise Dr."

letter from Lucy Pollard to Mary S.W. Pollard
1910-04-10 with two others, introduced evening session at Conference on Extension Work, Uffculme The British Friend XIX May:124
1910-09-29 ministered, as visitor, at Cumberland Quarterly Meeting at Cockermouth The Friend NS I:669, 1910-10-07
1910 of 4 Burlington Street, Ulverston Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, Annual Report 29
  became a worker for the Home Mission and Extension Committee in the area of Westmorland Quarterly Meeting DQB
1911 mission worker with Society of Friends, living in 6 rooms with wife and three children at 4 Burlington St, Ulverston RG14PN25623 RG78PN1469 RD481 SD3 ED10 SN221
1912-10-16 of 1 Newton Street, Ulverston; letter on ‘The Present Drift of Armaments.’ The Friend LII:704–5, 1912-10-25
1913-07-01 a co-opted member of the Northern Peace Board Frank Pollard, budget letter
1913-10-03 ‘Anti-Conscription Campaign in Westmorland Quarterly Meeting’ published in The Friend LIII:674  
1915-07-23 among signatories to petition to the Prime Minister, against war, proposed by Meeting for Sufferings, 1915-07-17, Newcastle The Friend LV:580
During WWI did much work to help aliens and conscientious objectors in and near Ulverston, where he was then working for the Home Service Committee The Friend 107:933, 1949-11-18
1919 worked for the YMCA at Barrow DQB
1921-04-02 silver wedding The Friend LXI:222, 1921-04-08
1921-07-03 of Sunny Bank, Three Bridges, Ulverston; wrote letter, published in The Friend LXI:467, 1921-07-15  
1921 became a member of the Northern Friends Peace Board DQB
1921-12-09

Arthur B. Pollard, of Ulverston, has recently addressed meetings in various towns under the auspices of the Northern Friends’ Peace Board. In October he visited Close House, Norton, and Stockton-on-Tees, Thirsk, Osmotherley, Acomb, Pickering and Pontefract, and in November Bishop Auckland, Earby, Burnley and Acomb for a second time. In each place he spoke upon the question of disarmament—occasionally in the open-air, but usually at indoor meetings, some of which had good press reports.

The Friend LXII:844
1922-03-14 with wife, party to a tenancy agreement on Rookhow Meeting House, until 1923-12-31 Cumbria RO catalogue
after 1921 became warden-caretaker of the meeting house at Rookhow, near Ulverston, where he remained until 1939 DQB
1922-10-27 report on Westmorland QM published in The Friend LXII:752 (as by 'A.B.P.')  
1927/1939 represented Westmorland QM on the Home Service Committee DQB
1927-07-23 wrote letter from Rook How, Haverthwaite, Ulverston The Friend LXVII:703, 1927-07-29
1927-07-30 wrote letter from Rook How, Haverthwaite, Ulverston The Friend LXVII:726, 1927-08-05
1928-05-11 spoke at Dublin Yearly Meeting The Friend LXVIII:427, 1928-05-18
1929-04-26 report on Westmorland QM published in The Friend LXIX:358  
1929-05-24 present at Dublin YM The Friend LXIX:453
1930-10-31 report on Westmorland QM published in The Friend LXX:995  
1931-04-06 wrote letter on the Trinity, from Rook How, Haverthwaite, Ulverston The Friend LXXI:319, 1931-04-10
1931-04-24 report on Westmorland QM published in The Friend LXX:362  
1931-05-11 had recently been in Dublin for YM Frank Pollard, budget letter
1931-08-15 of Rusland, near Ulverston; son’s wedding at Kendal The Friend LXXI:784, 1931-08-21
1932-09-08 . . . "how sorry we were to hear of Arthur's accident—it sounds nasty—I do hope he is going on all right." Frank Pollard, budget letter
1934-07-21 of Rusland; son’s wedding at Bolton

The Friend 92:744, 1934-08-10

1935-02-08 had recently visited Brighouse meeting The Friend 93:126
1936-06-08 of Rook How, Haverthwaite, near Ulverston Frank Pollard, budget letter
  30 years Secretary of Westmorland QM Extension Committee The Friend 107:933
1939 retired South. Continued on Extension Cmte of Bedfordshire QM The Friend 107:933
1939 became member of Watford Meeting, and was soon appointed an elder of Luton and Leighton Monthly Meeting DQB
1939/1940 of 87 Carpenders Avenue, Carpenders Park, Watford, Hertfordshire Ackworth Old Scholars' Association Report (1940/1941)
until 1941 member of the Friends Peace Committee DQB
1942-11-09 letter on ‘Armistice or Acquiescence?’, from 87 Carpenders Avenue, Watford The Friend 100:644
1946-03-01 letter on ‘Friends in the Forces’, from 87 Carpenders Avenue, Watford, Hertfordshire

The Friend 104:173–4

1946-04-02 Golden wedding. Now of 87 Carpenders Avenue, Watford The Friend 104:287
1949-06-25 Visited Westmorland QM at Kendal; former member of the QM The Friend 107:563
1949-11-01 of 87 Carpenders Avenue, Carpenders-park, Watford, Herts.; d. at The General Hospital, Edgware, Middlesex The Friend 107:907, 1949-11-11; GRO index; d. aged 79;
 

Wherever he found himself, he threw himself wholeheartedly into the work of the Society, sharing largely in the pastoral work of visitation and taking a lively interest in business meetings.

Many letters written at the time of his death bear witness to the wide range of his service and to the power of good which he became in the lives of so many in the course of his long and unwearying obedience to the call of Christ.

DQB
1949-11-18

ARTHUR BINNS POLLARD, who died on November 1, was born at Reigate in 1870, a son of William and Lucy Pollard. His parents moved north while he was at Ackworth, and on leaving school he went to live with them at Eccles. It was there that he first became interested in the temperance movement, first as a member of the Friends Juvenile Temperance Society and then as an energetic worker for the Band of Hope and the Sunday School at Byrom Street, Manchester. In this work he came to know Edith A. Jackson, whom he married in 1896.

Later years saw him actively engaged in work for peace. He was a member of the Northern Friends Peace Board from its inception to the time of his death, and for some years was a member of the Friends Peace Committee. During the first World War he did much to help aliens and conscientious objectors in and near Ulverson, where he was then working for the Home Service Committee.

A concern which lay very near his heart was the extension work of the Society, and during his 30 years' secretaryship of the Westmorland Q.M. Extension Committee he was a constant visitor among the small Meetings in that area. On retiring to the south in 1939 he continued this interest, serving on the Bedfordshire Q.M. Extension Committee and that of his Monthly Meeting; during these last 10 years he did much visitation of Meetings, often at considerable cost to his health and strength. He gave of his best in ministry and friendship in the service of Christ to the last.

His happy nature and confident faith endeared him to many, and there was an inspiring strength about his presence in Meeting for Worship whether or no he engaged in the vocal ministry.

The Friend 107:933
1950-02-27 will proved at London by Ernest Binns Pollard and Hubert Arthur Pollard; effects £917 18s. 5d. National Probate Calendar

 


Francis Edward Pollard 10. Francis Edward Pollard

 


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