Children of James and Martha Bennett

01. Eliza Bennett

1805-10-13 bapt. Chatham, Kent British Vital Records Index, 2nd edition
before 1813-07-04 presumably d. bennett family 2014

 


02. Diana Ann Bennett

1807-06-26 bapt. Chatham, Kent British Vital Records Index, 2nd edn; GRO suggests cal 1808; censuses suggest cal 1812/3 or 1817, Gravesend or Chatham
1841 milliner, living with her brother George and family at Upper Kempthorne Street, Gravesend, Kent TNA: HO 107/458/7 f44 p22
1843-12-12 m. Richard Speight (1818–1896, cab master, b. Northfleet, Kent), at Gillingham, Kent GRO index; TNA: HO 107/1608 f140 p43; "England Marriages, 1538–1973," database, FamilySearch: 10 February 2018, Richard Speight and Diana Ann Bennett, 12 Dec 1843, citing Gillingham, Kent, reference 80, index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City, FHL microfilm 1,042,493; bennett family 2014
1851 living with her husband, niece, and an errand boy, at 71 New Road, Gravesend, Kent HO 107/1608 f140 p43
1861 wife, but sole member of the household present at 15 Victoria Place, Gravesend TNA: RG 9/471 f133 p45
1871 living with her husband and a visitor at 15 Victoria Place; widowed lodger with two children also in the house RG 10/893 f26 p44
1881 living with her husband and a servant at 15 Stone Street, Gravesend RG 11/874 f28 p8
1886 Q2 d. Gravesend RD GRO index

 


03. James William Bennett

cal 1808 b. Chatham, Kent censuses
1808-12-04 bapt. Chatham "England Births and Christenings, 1538–1975," database, FamilySearch: 10 February 2018, James William Bennett, citing item 7, index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City, FHL microfilm 1,469,178
1831-11-27 m. Mary Ann Stephens (1810–1886, b. Gillingham), at Frindsbury, Kent GRO index; censuses; Kent marriages and banns; "England Deaths and Burials, 1538–1991," database, FamilySearch: 10 February 2018, Emily Bennett, burial 17 Aug 1853, citing Chatham in the District of Chapelry of Luton, Kent, index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City, FHL microfilm 1,473,673; bennett family 2014
Children: Rachael (1834–1908), Mary Ann (1835–1928), James Thomas (1837–1901), William (1846 – after 1883), Eliza (1848–1936), Emily (1850–1853), all b. Chatham
1841 shipwright, living with his wife and three children at Adelaide Place, Gillingham, Kent TNA: HO 107/487/5 f30 p24
1851 shipwright, living with his wife, five children, and two nieces, in Adelaide Street, Chatham TNA: HO 107/1611 f201 p33
1853-05-03

PURSUANT to an Order of the High Court of Chancery made in a cause James William Bennett against Richard Henry Stone and others, the Creditors of RICHARD STEPHENS, late of the White Hart public-house, CHATHAM, in the county of Kent, Licensed Victualler, who died in or about the month of January, 1852, are by their Solicitors, on or before the 8th day of JUNE, 1853, to come in and prove their Debts or Claims, at the Chambers of the Master of the Rolls, in the Rolls' Yard, Chancery Lane, Middlesex, or in default thereof they will be peremptorily excluded from the benefit of the said Order.

FRIDAY, the Tenth day of JUNE, 1853, at Two o'clock in the Afternoon, at the said Chambers, is appointed for hearing and adjudicating upon the Claims.

Dated this 3d day of May, 1853,

GEO. WHITING, Chief Clerk.

NICHOLS and CLARK,                 

Plaintiff's Solicitors,           

9, Cook's Court, Lincoln's Inn.

Kentish Gazette, 1853-05-17
1853-08-02 Rochester and Chatham:

COUNTY PETTY SESSIONS.—We are requested by Mr. James William Bennett, in reference to a report which appeared in the Gazette of the 19th July, concerning the opposition made by Mr. Stephenson, solicitor, to the transfer of the White Hart public-house license from Mr. Wm. H. Bennett to his brother, which opposition was said to be at the instance of Mr. Woodyer,—to state that on Friday, the 22nd, Mr. Woodyer called upon Mr. W.H. Bennett, and in the presence of ten or welve respectable persons whose names Mr. B. has, denied that he had ever authorised any person to make use of his name in the matter, and that he had never said or done anything calculated to injure Mr. Bennett's character. We are further informed that the Tories are resorting to vexations proceedings of this kind in order to intimidate publicans, and compel them, for their own protection, to become partisans of those who can grant or refuse licenses at their discretion. If similar annoyances are repeated, the whole of the circumstances with the parties concerned in them will be brought before the public. We may add that on Wednesday last the license of the White Hart was transferred to Mr. W.H. Bennett, without opposition.

South Eastern Gazette
1855-07-11 at Rochester County Court:

STEVENS v. MOODY.

Mr. Sharland was for the plaintiff. This was an action to recover £15, balance of account for money lent.

Mrs. Rachel Stevens, wife of the plaintiff, stated that in August, 1849, she lent the defendant's wife £20, of which sum she had since paid £5. Witness had authorised her son, Richard, to employ Mr. Stephenson to get the money, but had never authorised him to take a bill or promissory note for it. She had not received any portion of the £15. Her son was since dead, and she had instructed her son-in-law, Bennett, to apply for the money about 15 months ago. In consequence of what she told him, he went to Mr. Stephenson. She had never seen any promissory note or bill of exchange for the amount, nor heard of such a thing till Bennett told her.

By Defendant—You did not bring me any money. You came and wanted my husband to sign a paper, but I told you he should not, as the case was in Mr. Stephenson's hands. You did not offer me ten shillings.

James William Bennett stated that he went to Moody and told him that as his father and mother-in-law were now without protectors in consequence of the death of their son, he wanted to know what he meant to do about the money.

[coverage continues, but no further reference to JWB]

Maidstone Journal and Kentish Advertiser, 1855-07-17
1861 licensed victualler, living with his wife, three children, and a grandson, at the White Hart public house, 238 High Street, Chatham TNA: RG 9/482 f79 p20 & f80 p21
1865-06-20 at the annual prize shooting of the Kent Volunteer Association, at Milton-next-Gravesend:

Messrs. H. Bennett, of the Swan Inn, Parrock-street, C.B. Bennett, New Inn, and J. Bennett, Fountain Hotel, supplied the dinners and other refreshments to the Volunteers.

Maidstone Journal and Kentish Advertiser, 1865-06-26
1865-11-21 of Chatham Maidstone Journal and Kentish Advertiser, 1865-11-27
1871 retired victualler, living with his wife and daughter at Constitution Hill, Chatham RG 10/911 f79 p5
1875-11-14 d. Chatham GRO index; Find a Grave
1875-11-22 bur. St Mary's, Chatham "England, Kent, Parish Registers, 1538–1911," database with images, FamilySearch: 10 December 2017, James William Bennett, 22 Nov 1875, citing Burial, St Marys, Chatham, Kent, Kent Archives Office, Maidstone, FHL microfilm 1,473,663; Find a Grave

 


04. George Henry Bennett

cal 1811 b. Chatham, Kent British Vital Records Index, 2nd edn; censuses
1811-03-17 bapt. Chatham "England Births and Christenings, 1538–1975," database, FamilySearch: 10 February 2018, George Henry Bennett, citing item 7, index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City, FHL microfilm 1,469,178
1836-10 at West Kent Quarter Sessions:

JOHN JOHNSON, for stealing one coat, value 15s., the property of George Henry Bennett, at Gravesend.—Three months' hard labor.

South Eastern Gazette, 1836-10-25
1838-05-17 m. Mary Ann Hallsey (1817–1890, b. Gravesend, d. of Daniel and Harriott Hallsey), St Peter and St Paul, Gravesend, Kent "England Marriages, 1538–1973," database, FamilySearch: 10 February 2018, George Henry Bennett and Mary Ann Hallsey, 17 May 1838, citing Milton-Next-Gravesend, Kent, reference 26, index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City, FHL microfilm 992,512TNA: HO 107/487/7 f7 p6 (wife Ann); HO 107/1608 f251 p5; GRO index; "England Births and Christenings, 1538–1975," database, FamilySearch: 11 February 2018, Mary Ann Hallsey, 30 Nov 1817, citing index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City, FHL microfilm 0992511, 0992512-13
Children: Mary Ann (1839–1918), George Adolphus (1841–1897), Henry William (1843–1851), Ellen Sophia (1845–1847), Alice Martha (1847–1921), Frank Richard (1853–1857), Edmund John (1857–1923); all b. Gravesend censuses; GRO index
1841 painter, living with his family and his sister Diana at Upper Kempthorne Street, Gravesend, Kent TNA: HO 107/458/7 f44 p21
1849 plumber, of 28 Queen Street, Gravesend Kimber and Bell Family Tree No2, citing Hall's Gravesend Directory
1851 master painter, living with his family and one house servant at 28 Queen Street, Milton next Gravesend, Kent HO 107/1608 f251 pp5-6
1855, 1859 plumber, of 28 Queen Street, Gravesend Kimber and Bell Family Tree No2, citing Hall's Gravesend Directory
1861 plumber and painter, living with his family and one domestic servant at 28 Queen Street, Milton, Gravesend TNA: RG 9/470 f38 p16
1865, 1870 plumber, of 28 Queen Street, Gravesend Kimber and Bell Family Tree No2, citing Hall's Gravesend Directory
1866-01-05

THE LATE CHARGE OF ROBBERY AT HUGGENS'S COLLEGE.—Yesterday (Friday) week, at the quarter sessions, Maidstone, Alfred Stedman, on bail, was charged with stealing 5 taps, and 160lbs. of leaden piping, the property of George Henry Bennett, Gravesend, on the 30th November. Mr. Smith appeared for the prosecution, and Mr. Addison defended. The prisoner is the son of a builder at Northfleet, and an apprentice of the prosecutor's, a plumber, &c., at Gravesend. In November last, prosecutor had some work at Huggens's College, Northfleet, and the prisoner was put on that work, but in about three weeks he was taken off. On the evening of the 30th, a day or two after his being taken from the work, he was seen on the premises of the College, near to house No. 25, which was unoccupied, and used as a store-room and workshop. On the morning  of the 1st ult., some brass taps were missed from the house, and early next morning prisoner went to an eating-house in Gravesend, kept by a Mr. Hodgkin, and left a parcel, which was afterwards given up to P.C. Norris, who found it contained the brass taps in question. The prisoner was taken into custody, and in a cupboard in the cellar of his father's house was found a quantity of leaden piping cut into pieces. As regarded this piping, however, there was really no evidence to show that any had been stolen. The brass taps found in the bundle resembled those missed, but they could not be sworn to. Several witnesses were called who had known the prisoner from childhood, and they gave him an excellent character. The jury acquitted the prisoner. There was another indictment against him for stealing three other taps that were found in the bundle left at Hodgkin's, but the jury acquitted him on this charge also.

Gravesend Reporter, North Kent and South Essex Advertiser, 1866-01-13
by 1869-01-05 of Queen-street; had donated 10s. to the Town Soup Kitchen and Provident Relief Society Maidstone Journal and Kentish Advertiser, 1869-01-11
1871 plumber, living with his family and one general servant at 28 Queen St, Milton, Gravesend RG 10/890 f60 p51
by 1872-12-21 had subscribed 5s. for the Christmas Dinner to the Poor Gravesend Reporter, North Kent and South Essex Advertiser, 1872-12-21
1873-06-05 d. Milton-next-Gravesend GRO index; National Probate Calendar

On the 5th inst., after a short illness, at his residence, 28, Queen-street, Gravesend, Mr. George Henry Bennett, aged 62 years.

Gravesend Reporter, North Kent and South Essex Advertiser, 1873-06-07
1873-06-12 bur. Plot 1354 Section A, Milton Cemetery, Old Road West, Gravesend "England, Kent, Parish Registers, 1538–1911," database with images, FamilySearch: 8 December 2017, George Henry Bennett, 12 Jun 1873, citing Burial, Gravesend, Kent, Kent Archives Office, Maidstone, FHL microfilm 992,673; Kent burials; Kimber and Bell Family Tree No2
1873-07-21 will proved at the Principal Registry by Mary Ann Bennett of 28 Queen-street Milton-next-Gravesend Widow the Relict the sole Executrix National Probate Calendar

 


05. Eliza Bennett

1813-07-04 bapt. Chatham, Kent Kent baptisms
1813-09-02 bur. St Mary, Chatham Kent burials

 


06. Henry Richard Bennett

cal 1815 b. Chatham, Kent censuses; Kent baptisms
1815-08-18 of Chatham; bapt. there Kent baptisms
1838-05-17 m.1. Mary Anne Elizabeth Kennedy (1818–1840, b. Deptford, Kent), at SS Peter and Paul, Milton by Gravesend, Kent GRO index; Kent marriages and banns
Child: Mary Ann (1839–1888, b. Chatham) TNA: RG 9/470 f126 p12; GRO index; Kent burials; bennett family 2014
1841 publican, living with his wife and daughter in High Street, Chatham TNA: HO 107/587/8 f8 p8
1851 gentleman, widower, living with his brother, sister, one servant, and a lodger at 51 Queen St, Milton next Gravesend, Kent HO 107/1608 f206 p9
1861 licensed victualler, living with his daughter, sister, niece, and two servants at "Swan", 173 Parrock St, Milton, Gravesend RG 9/470 f126 p12
1865-06-20 at the annual prize shooting of the Kent Volunteer Association, at Milton-next-Gravesend:

Messrs. H. Bennett, of the Swan Inn, Parrock-street, C.B. Bennett, New Inn, and J. Bennett, Fountain Hotel, supplied the dinners and other refreshments to the Volunteers.

Maidstone Journal and Kentish Advertiser, 1865-06-26
1865-08-03 licensed victualler, of Henry Street; m.2. Emily Ravenor (1841–1867, of Henry Street, b. Dartford, Kent, d. of Henry John Ravenor, plumber), at Holy Trinity, Grays Inn Road, London, after banns GRO index; parish register
Child: Fanny (1865–1937, b. Gravesend) GRO index; RG 10/1639 f5 p2; bennett family 2014
1866-04-27 at Gravesend Police Court:

The license of the Swan was provisionally transferred from Mr. Henry Richard Bennett to Mr. John Cockburn.

Gravesend Reporter, North Kent and South Essex Advertiser, 1866-04-28
1867-02-28

COMPLIMENTARY DINNER.—On Thursday a complimentary dinner to Mr. Henry Bennett, late of the Swan, Parrock-street, came off at the Railway Tavern, Northfleet. The dinner was originated by a number of gentlemen of Gravesend, who had known Mr. Bennett as a tradesman of the town of Gravesend for the past twenty-four years. Upwards of forty tradesmen sat down to an excellent dinner, provided by the host, Mr. W.H. Bennett, under the presidency of Mr. Charles Bennett, of the New Inn, Gravesend, who was faced by Mr. Herbert, governor of the Licensed Victuallers' School. After the cloth was removed several capital songs were sung by the company, and the health of the host and hostess was cordially drank [sic] and respectfully responded to by Mr. Bennett.

Maidstone Journal and Kentish Advertiser, 1867-03-02
1871 licensed victualler, living with his daughter and one servant at Title Deeds, Queens Road, Chigwell, Essex RG 10/1639 f5 p2
1876-04-30 licensed victualler, of Trinity parish; m.3. Evangeline Joseph (1853–1930, of Trinity parish, b. Bow, d. of David Joseph, builder), Holy Trinity, Grays Inn Road, London, after banns RG 11/374 f45 p18; GRO index; parish register
1881 liscend victr, living with his wife, daughter, three servants, a porter, and a lodger at 16 Farringdon St, St Sepulchre, London (next property is the Old Bailey, and next to that Newgate Prison) RG 11/374 f45 p18
1891 licenced victualler, employer, living with five servants at 28 Farringdon St, St Sepulchre Newgate, London RG 12/237 f32 p3
1896-12-30 d. Hackney RD; as Richard Henry Bennett GRO index

BENNETT.—On the 30th ult., at 53, Amhurst-road, Hackney, Henry Richard Bennett, late of Farringdon-street, London, E.C., and formerly of Gravesend; in his 82nd year.

Gravesend Reporter, North Kent and South Essex Advertiser, 1897-01-09
shortly before 1899-01-06

AN OLD MEMBER OF THE CITY CORPORATION.

At the Hackney Coroner's Court, Dr. Wynn Westcott held an inquest as to the death of Henry Richard Bennett, aged 83, a licensed victualler, late of Amherst-road, Homerton. For some time the deceased had suffered from illness, and on Friday died suddenly. The deceased had for some years been an active member of the City Corporation, and on the day of his sudden death one of his daughters was married.

Dr. Beale said that the cause of death was sudden failure of the heart's action, and the jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Islington Gazette and Hackney and Kingsland Gazette, 1899-01-06

 


07. Eleanor Charlotte Bennett

1818-05-27 of Chatham, Kent; bapt. St Mary's, Chatham Kent baptisms
before 1841 (presumably before 1839, possibly before 1837 Q3) m.1. John Clifford (1814–1842, publican, b. Boughton-Monchelsea, Kent, s. of Thomas and Elizabeth Clifford) GRO index; TNA: HO 107/407/3 f39 p7; "England, Kent, Parish Registers, 1538–1911," database with images, FamilySearch, John Clifford, 12 Aug 1814, citing Christening, Boughton-Monchelsea, Kent, Kent Archives Office, Maidstone, FHL microfilm 1,473,726; parish register of Wye, Kent
Child: John (cal 1839 – ?), b. Kent TNA: HO 107/407/3 f39 p7
1841 living with her family at the Little George, High Street, Chatham; a seven-year-old Alfred Bennett also recorded there, presumably her brother
1845-06-01 widow, of Bear & Staff Public House, St Margaret's, Rochester, Kent; m.2. William Merralls (1823–1861, carpenter, of Bear & Staff Public House, St Margaret's, Rochester, b. Chatham, s. of Jesse Merralls, carpenter, deceased, and his wife Sarah, née Elmore), at St Margaret's pc, Rochester, by licence GRO index; parish register; HO 107/1611 f198 p28; Kentish Mercury and Penny Illustrated Paper, 1861-10-19; Merralls Family Tree
1851 living with her husband and son, with a lodger, in Rhode Street, Chatham HO 107/1611 f198 p28
1861 living with her husband and a 23-year-old John le Mills [possibly an alias for her son?], at 4 Rhode Street, Chatham TNA: RG 9/482 f9 p9
1861-10-12 husband committed suicide by hanging Kentish Mercury and Penny Illustrated Paper, 1861-10-19
1871 widow, dressmaker and milliner, living with a lodger at 4 Rhode Street, Chatham RG 10/910 f86 p24
1875 Q4 d. Medway RD GRO index

 


08. Charles Benjamin Bennett

cal 1820 b. Chatham, Kent TNA: HO 107/1608 f206 p9
1821-01-03 of Chatham, Kent; bapt. St Mary's, Chatham Kent baptisms
1841 not found in census  
1851 victualler, living with his brother, sister, one servant, and a lodger at 51 Queen St, Milton next Gravesend, Kent TNA: HO 107/1608 f206 p9
1851-06-15

TOWN ARMS HOTEL, GRAVESEND.

MR. CHARLES BENNETT, PROPRIETOR.

Gentlemen and Visitors to Gravesend are respectfully informed that they will find superior accommodation at this superb Establishment, situated in QUEEN-STREET, near the Market Place, and only two minutes' walk from the Terrace and Town Piers. Commodious and well-aired Bed-rooms. Hot and cold Luncheons, Soups, Fish, &c.. Wines and Spirits of the best quality, and the prices moderate. Fine Ales and Bottled Stout.      An Ordinary every day at Two o'Clock.

Private Dinner and Supper Rooms. Bed and Breakfast Half-a-crown.

The Era
Q4 1852 m. Elizabeth Marklew (cal 1828 – 1889, b. Watlington, Oxfordshire), Greenwich RD GRO index; TNA: RG 9/470 f71 p18; RG 11/1383 f121 p30
Children: Charles Robert John (1853–1921), Arthur Marklew (1855–1887), Ernest Grissell (1856–1941), Frederick Butler (1857–1944), Caroline Elizabeth (1860 – ?), and Ada Marklew (1867–1943), all b. Gravesend censuses; GRO index
1859-07-18 at Gravesend Police Court, John Hastings charged with wilful damage for destroying a valuable kite, the property of C.B. Bennett:

Charles Benjamin Bennett, examined by Mr. Fenton, deposed—I am a licensed victualler, carrying on business at the Town Arms, in Queen Street. On Monday last I was on Windmill Hill, with some friends, flying a kite which I had constructed with great pains for the amusement of my children. The kite was in the form of a sailor, and had occupied all my leisure time for upwards of a month to make it; it was handsomely decorated and was very large. The sketch now produced is an accurate representation of it. It had glass eyes; and the words, "Town Arms," were inscribed on the riband round the hat of the sailor. While the kite was flying, the tail broke, which caused the kite to pitch and toss about and ultimately to fall into the defendant's garden. The defendant was working in the garden, and on seeing the kite fall he immediately left his work and commenced destroying the kite and kicking it to pieces. The bystanders called out "shame" and hooted at him. The value of the kite was 20s. The boys who hooted the defendant were not with me. I distinctly saw the defendant destroy the kite.

Cross-examined by defendant—I was on the hill when I saw you destroy it.

[Defendant ordered to pay 10s. for the damage done to the kite and 9s. 6d. costs.]

Kentish Independent, 1859-07-23

DESTROYING A KITE.—John Hastings, a gardener, was charged with destroying a fancy calico kite, the property of Mr. Bennett, landlord of the Town Arms, Queen-street, value 20s. Mr. Fenton appeared for the complainant,—who, in opening the case, said he would proved that wanton and malicious damage had been done to the property of his client by the defendant. The kite was a fancy one made by Mr. Bennett in his leisure time, for the amusement of his children; it was made in the form of a sailor-boy. He here submitted to the Magistrates a drawing of the kite in question. The complainant went to the Windmill-hill to fly it, and the tail came off, and the kite fell on the defendant's land. He came up and jumped on it, and tore it to pieces. Mr. Bennett did not use any abusive language to him, and did not incite others to do it.

Charles Benjamin Bennett, the complainant, sworn, stated that he went to the hill for the purpose of lying his child's kite, and from some accident, the tail came off, and the kite fell on to a market-gardener's garden. He ordered the string to be cut immediately the kite fell. Defendant instantly left his work, in a distant part of the garden, and came up to the spot where it was lying and destroyed it. The defendant went back to his work and would not come near witness for a long time. The boys who were on the hill, hooted at the defendant, but witness told them not to do so. He afterwards came near witness, and on his enquiring why he had destroyed his kite, he said he had his own business to attend to and if he had received any injury he was to seek reparation at the proper place.

Samuel Parker, currier, living in Queen-street, stated that he was with the complainant on the hill flying the kite in question, when the tail broke off, and the kite fell. it fell upon some fruit bushes. The defendant was in the garden and came from another part, and witness saw him do something with the kite. He was some distance from the kite when the defendant destroyed it. Witness did not see the cord cut. He saw it afterwards a complete wreck. The injury was not such as might have been done by the fall. The boys who hooted the defendant did not belong to the complainant. There were a great number of persons on the hill, who seemed greatly annoyed at the defendant's conduct. The kite fall on to defendant's garden was purely accidental.

Cross-examined by the defendant.—The complainant did not treat the boys with beer to insult the defendant. He did not encourage them in any way to commit a breach of the peace.

The defendant said the kite was destroyed before he touched it. Some one had pulled it along his crop of valuable Egyptian peas, which were growing for seed.

Mr. Bennett recalled.—The string was cut, and therefore he could not draw it.

John Holdaway, in the employ of the defendant, stated that he was in the garden when the kite fell; he was nearer to it than the defendant. It fell on the potatoes, and was dragged on to the peas; it had crossed two rows and was on the third, when defendant went up to it, and seeing that it was injuring his property, he put his foot on it for the purpose of breaking the string.

Cross-examined by Mr. Fenton.—Was about fifty yards off the kite. Did not go any nearer to it. Saw it move over the peas; it was dragged over for about ten or twelve yards.

Fined 10s. for the kite, and the costs 9s. 6d.

Gravesend Reporter, North Kent and South Essex Advertiser, 1859-07-23
1861 victualler, living with his family, one servant, and a lodger, at "Town Arms", 51 Queen Street, Milton, Gravesend RG 9/470 f71 p18
1861-10-19

We learn by an announcement in another part of our columns, that our fellow townsman, Mr. C.B. Bennett, late of the Town Arms, Queen Street, has become the host of the New In.. We have no doubt that under his management, although the bowling green is no more, and neat post chaises are things of the past, a very social game at "bowls" may still be played and a "neat" article be furnished, although not in the shame of a post chaise.

Kentish Independent
1861-12-06 licence for the New Inn transferred from J.W. Clunne to C.B. Bennett, of the Town Arms from C.B. Bennett to B. Cooper Gravesend Reporter, North Kent and South Essex Advertiser,
1864-02-28 at Gravesend Police Court, two men charged with disorderly conduct at the New Inn:

Charles Benjamin Bennett deposed that he was landlord of the New Inn public house. He was in the coffee room talking to several gentlemen, when his attention was drawn to the bar by the violent conduct of the prisoners. Witness told them he could not allow such conduct in his house, and on their refusing to leave, he, with assistance, put them into the street. Taylor then deliberately smashed the windows. The prisoners were then taken to the station, Taylor resisting very much.

[Taylor fined £2 11s including damage and costs, or one month's imprisonment; Blackman fined 5s or seven days' imprisonment; both fines promptly paid.]

Kentish Independent, 1864-03-04
1865-02-27 at Gravesend Police Court:

William Taylor, and Henry Blackman, two young men described as painters, were charged with disorderly conduct at the New Inn public-house. Taylor was also charged with assaulting the barmaid, and also with wilfully breaking two squares of glass at the same house.—Blanche Emily Dunkley deposed that she was barmaid at the New Inn public-house. The prisoner Taylor, on Saturday night about eleven o'clock, came into the New Inn and called for a glass of ale and a half-ounce of tobacco, for which she charged him 4d.; her attention was then drawn to another part of the bar to serve some customers, and whilst serving them Taylor came to her and wished for his money back again, which she refused to give him; on her refusal Taylor called her a thief, and a rogue, and used other filthy language, and at the same time threw a sugar crusher at her, which struck her on the shoulder; she felt so annoyed at this that she slapped his face; the prisoner again struck her, and she, witness, then threw part of a glass of ale over him, and whilst she was going out of the bar into the bar-parlour he threw part of a glass of ale over her, and at the same time threatened to smash her head with a glass.—Charles Benjamin Bennett deposed that he was the landlord of the New Inn public-house; he was in the coffee-room talking to several gentlemen, when his attention was drawn to the bar by the violent conduct of the prisoners; on going into the bar he told the prisoners he could not allow such conduct in his house, and on their refusing to leave the house, he, with the assistance of several customers, put them out into the street. Directly witness got inside the door, the prisoner Taylor deliberately smashed the windows in the doors; they were of great thickness, and were engraved with the Freemason's Arms; the value of the windows was £1 6d. 6d. Witness's hand was cut by the falling glass, the prisoner then tried to smash another window, value £3, but could not succeed; the window was all smeared with blood, and his (the prisoner's) hand was most frightfully cut; the prisoners were then taken to the police-station.—Mr. Supt. White deposed that he was at the station when the prisoners were brought in; the prisoner Taylor was very drunk, and made use of most foul language; he bled very profusely from a wound in the hand; the place was like a slaughter-house with blood. Drs. Whitcombe and Sanders were sent for, and attended and dressed the wounds, which were considered very dangerous at the time.—The prisoner Taylor said he did not assault the barmaid till she assaulted him; he was then so exasperated, that he did not know what he did.—The prisoner Blackman had nothing to say.—The bench after consulting, inflicted a fine of 10s., together with the damage of £1 6s. 6d., 10s., for the attendance of the medical men, and 4s. costs, making £2 11s., or one month's imprisonment. Blackman was fined 5s., including costs, or seven days. The fines were paid in both cases.

Gravesend Reporter, North Kent and South Essex Advertiser, 1865-03-04
1865-06-20 at the annual prize shooting of the Kent Volunteer Association, at Milton-next-Gravesend:

Messrs. H. Bennett, of the Swan Inn, Parrock-street, C.B. Bennett, New Inn, and J. Bennett, Fountain Hotel, supplied the dinners and other refreshments to the Volunteers.

Maidstone Journal and Kentish Advertiser, 1865-06-26
1866-09-06 present at the fete organised by the licensed victuallers of Gravesend and Milton, and played for Milton in the cricket match Maidstone Journal and Kentish Advertiser, 1866-09-10
the cricket match and the following dinner had been organised by Mr C.B. Bennett, of the New Inn Maidstone Journal and Kentish Advertiser, 1866-09-08
1867-02-28 of the New Inn, Gravesend; presided at the complimentary dinner to his brother Henry, at the Railway Tavern, Northfleet, Kent Maidstone Journal and Kentish Advertiser, 1867-03-02
1867-04-13

WANTED, a GENERAL SERVANT, with a Good Character, who understands plain cooking; a man-servant kept.—Apply at Mr. C.B. Bennett's, New Inn, Gravesend.

Gravesend Reporter, North Kent and South Essex Advertiser
1867-09-28 one of the organisers of the Gravesend and Meopham Races Morning Advertiser
1868-05-02

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC!

CHARLES BENNETT,

WINE AND SPIRIT MERCHANT, "NEW INN," GRAVESEND,

AGENT TO THE

Licensed Victuallers' TEA ASSOCIATION,

And Appointer of Agents for Gravesend and District.

In reply to numerous enquiries, GROCERS ARE NOT supplied by the Association or its Agents.

The TEA can only be obtained of Licensed Victuallers.

Tae-Ping, the finest strong Black Tea......................2s. 6d. per lb.

EQUAL TO GROCERS' TEA AT FOUR SHILLINGS.

Tae-Ping, the finest Green Tea................................3s. 6d. per lb.

EQUAL TO GROCERS' TEA AT FIVE SHILLINGS.

Gravesend Reporter, North Kent and South Essex Advertiser
1868-11-19 at Gravesend Police Court:

Charles B. Bennett, of the New Inn, was charged with casing fireworks on the 9th inst.—P.S. Martin proved the offence.—Defendant was fined 10s.

Gravesend Reporter, North Kent and South Essex Advertiser, 1868-11-21
1869-07-12 licence of the Cubitt Arms, Manchester-road, Poplar, transferred from Henry Smallman to Charles Benjamin Bennett East London Observer, 1869-07-17
1871 licensed victualler, living with his family, a barmaid and a housemaid, at the Cubit Arms, Poplar RG 10/588 f52 p49
1881-03-07 at the Tower Hamlets licensing sessions, the licence of the Cubitt Arms, London-terrace, Poplar, was transferred from Charles Benjamin Bennett to George Arthur Saunders East London Observer, 1881-03-12
1881 commercial traveller, living with his family and one servant at 7 Stonebridge V[illas], Townshend Rd, Tottenham, Middlesex RG 11/1383 f121 p30
1883-08-03 commercial traveller, formerly of 7 Stonebridge-villas, South Tottenham, but late of 62 Campbell-road, Bow, Middlesex; d. at the University College Hospital, Gower-street, St Pancras, Middlesex RG 12/468 f26 p43; GRO index; National Probate Calendar
1883-09-03 will proved at the Principal Registry by his widow, the sole executrix; personal estate £117 9s. 3d. National Probate Calendar

 


09. Richard Sutton Bennett

cal 1823 b. Chatham, Kent Kent baptisms; TNA: HO 107/1611 f29 p30
1823-07-27 of Chatham; bapt. St Mary's, Chatham Kent baptisms
1841-04-25 gave evidence in assault case at Rochester Petty Sessions:

Richard Bennett of Rhode street, Chatham, said I am a shipwright in the Dock Yard, myself and two other young men were walking down the street, near to the Globe inn, we saw four four gentlemen going up the street, they were walking together on the pavement, the same side of the way as the Globe, one of the gentlemen had a yellow stick in his hand, and one of them broke one of the Globe windows. I saw the officer Dudgeon shove his stick into it, one of my companions named Terry, immediately went into the Globe and told Mr. Jenner of the circumstance; I and the complainant went directly upwards to the Aun [sc. Sun] hotel, the gentlemen were not in uniform, myself and Terry saw the four gentlemen in the hall of the inn, heard one of the officers swear very much; Mr. Dudgeon is the person who struck me, I can only recognise Mr. Dudgeon and Mr. Puleston, but the whole four officers came out to the door, and they offered to fight. Mr. Dudgeon had a stick in his hand, and he offered to fight any one or all, several persons answered him, and one man, named Mott, said he would fight him, Mr. Dudgeon then run into Mott, and afterwards Mr. Dudgeon struck me on the shoulder, I ran away towards Mr. Wells; I saw Mr. Dudgeon strike the ostler Attersall, with a stick twice across the head, the last time Attersall fell down into the horse road, I did not see Mr. Prettyman do anything, but the whole of the four officers went out of the door of the Aun [sc. Sun] inn, a young man named Rigby picked up the end of the stick and gave it to me, Attersall was in the horse road, near to Mr. Wickham's when he was knocked down, I cannot say where Mr. Prettyman was, Attersall did not say anything to provoke the officer.—

Cross examined by Mr. Hills:—I was struck both times by Mr. Dudgeon, whilst I was standing near to Mr. Hollicks, the linen draper, I saw Attersall struck, and as I was going down the street homewards, I met with the gentleman, and they said you are one of them, and Mr. Dodge struck me across the face. It was about 25 minutes to 10 o'clock at night, the affair took place.

By the court:—They did not make a noise, but they laughed after they broke the window. The mob did not molest the officers, Mr. Dudgeon brought out of the Inn a poker, and said "I am the one come along," and run after the people, the persons were frightened and run away, when he had the poker he was in his uniform.

Henry James Rigby sworn said, I live in the High-street, Chatham, I saw the ostler at the Globe Inn, struck on the night of Thursday week, near the Sun hotel, Chatham, I think the officer that struck him was Capt. Pulleston, he also struck me and the young man Bennett.

West Kent Guardian, 1841-05-01
1841 shipwright ap., living with his family in Rhode St, Chatham TNA: HO 107/487/4 f23 p12
1844-03-18 gave evidence in the dockyard robbery case, at the County Police Court

Richard Sutton Bennett, an apprentice to a shipwright, stated that he attended the Dockyard school, and had a set of mathematical instruments furnished to him by the master, those instruments belonged to the Crown, they were given to him in brown paper, he did not use them as he had a case of instruments of his own. The Government instruments, are missing. Witness missed them on the 22d of last month, on the 8th of February he went to Killick's shop in the High-street of Chatham, to purchase some webbing. It was about 8 o'clock in the evening. Killick is a general dealer, in the shop he saw the prisoner and his boy Gates, on the counter he perceived lying on brown paper two pair of compasses, a small pair of dead-eye sweeps, and one pen holder fit for the use of compasses. Witness asked the prisoner where he got these instruments from, he said he had bought them of a little boy, three or four nights or a week back. Witness told the prisoner they belonged to the Dockyard school, he asked the prisoner if he knew the boy. The prisoner then said he did not buy them himself but his boy, he afterwards said his father-in-law had bought them. The prisoner then said to his shop boy why did you not put the things away and not let them lay about on the counter. Witness afterwards acquainted the master of the school what he had seen. The master and himself then went to the prisoner's house, witness went into the shop and spoke to the prisoner, and asked him the price of the instruments he had seen lying on his counter previously. Prisoner said he had not them, as he had sold them to a boy named Fox and they had been bought of a boy named Wright, witness told the prisoner that if he had sold them, he would have to find them again as they belonged to the school, and that the master was coming to him about them. Prisoner said he could not help that. The master then came into the shop.

By the Court: The instruments were exposed on the counter lying in brown paper and appeared as if fresh bought. Witness examined only one pair of compasses and they had the mark cross-ways on the top, witness believes the apprentices put their private marks on the instruments furnished to them.

[Killick discharged, Fox committed for trial on four different counts of felony.]

West Kent Guardian, 1844-03-23
1846 Q2 m. Mary Ann Terry (cal 1820/1823 – 1900, b. Chatham), Medway RD HO 107/1611 f29 p30; GRO index; information from Mike Morson
1851 shipwright, living with his wife in Rhode Street, Chatham HO 107/1611 f29 p30
Child: Catherine Esther Rachel Maud (1853–1929, b. Chatham) TNA: RG 9/482 f51 p9; London Standard, 1874-02-26; information from Mike Morson, citing Le Petit Gironde, at www.retronews.fr
1860-05-18

ACCIDENTS IN CHATHAM. [ . . . ] A second accident also happened to Richard Bennett, leading-man of the shipwrights employed breaking up the two mortar vessels, who was struck by the end of one of the beams, and thrown into the hold, sustaining a very severe injury to the spine and also to the front part of the skull.

Dover Express, 1860-05-19
1861 leading man shipwright, living with his family, one servant, and a lodger, at 34 Gibraltar Place, Gillingham, Kent RG 9/482 f51 p9
1864-08-10 gave evidence in an assault case at the County Sessions:

Richard Bennett, shipwright, said he was at work on the staging of the ship, where the defendant also was. The plank was rocking about, and suddenly the witness heard the complainant call out. The defendant then got off the stage, and witness saw the blood rolling down his head. The piece of wood fell about three feet.

Mr. Nicholson asked the witness if a piece of wood falling that depth would cause a wound of the nature now shewn on the complainant's head?

The witness said it would. The piece of wood was hard African oak, the witness had received a similar wound from of piece of wood which fell off the stage. He was within 12 feet of the defendant at the time of the occurrence.

South Eastern Gazette, 1864-08-16
1869-05-15 leading man of shipwrights at Chatham Dockyard; superannuated on £30 per annum Army and Navy Gazette
1871 superannuated shipwright, living with his family at 34 Gibraltar Place, Gillingham RG 10/910 f21 p7
1874-02-19 of Gibraltar-terrace, Chatham; daughter married at St John's Church, Chatham Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette, 1874-02-26
1876-11-07 gentleman, of 34 Gibraltar-place, Chatham; d. there GRO index; Kent burials; National Probate Calendar
1876-11-13 bur. grave 538C, Section N, Maidstone Road & Palmerston Road Cemetery, Chatham Kent burials
1876-12-16 will proved at the Principal Registry by Mary Ann Bennett and William Henry Bennett, executors National Probate Calendar


10. William Henry Bennett

cal 1826 b. Kent TNA: HO 107/487/4 f23 p12; HO 107/1611 f156 p31
1826-03-10 bapt. St Mary's, Chatham, Kent Kent baptisms
1841 living with family in Rhode St, Chatham HO 107/487/4 f23 p12
1851 not found in census  
1852 Q1 m. 1. Emma Bingham Moverly (cal 1825 – 1870, b. Chatham), St Mary the Virgin, Chatham TNA: RG 9/482 f74 p9; RG 10/910 f35 p1; GRO index; Marriage Locator
Children: William Henry (1853–1921), James Robert (1854–1894), Emma Ellen Susannah Moverly (1856–1948), Susannah Isabella (1858–1908), all b. Medway RD RG 9/482 f74 p9; GRO index
1853-08-02 Rochester and Chatham:

COUNTY PETTY SESSIONS.—We are requested by Mr. James William Bennett, in reference to a report which appeared in the Gazette of the 19th July, concerning the opposition made by Mr. Stephenson, solicitor, to the transfer of the White Hart public-house license from Mr. Wm. H. Bennett to his brother, which opposition was said to be at the instance of Mr. Woodyer,—to state that on Friday, the 22nd, Mr. Woodyer called upon Mr. W.H. Bennett, and in the presence of ten or welve respectable persons whose names Mr. B. has, denied that he had ever authorised any person to make use of his name in the matter, and that he had never said or done anything calculated to injure Mr. Bennett's character. We are further informed that the Tories are resorting to vexations proceedings of this kind in order to intimidate publicans, and compel them, for their own protection, to become partisans of those who can grant or refuse licenses at their discretion. If similar annoyances are repeated, the whole of the circumstances with the parties concerned in them will be brought before the public. We may add that on Wednesday last the license of the White Hart was transferred to Mr. W.H. Bennett, without opposition.

South Eastern Gazette, 1864-08-10
1861 grocer &c., living with his family and one servant at 261 High St, Chatham, Kent RG 9/482 f74 p9
1863-07-04

THE

Cheapest House in the Towns for Grocery.

GOOD SWEET BUTTER........................................6d. per lb.

NEW BACON—prime cuts.......................4½d. & 5d.      "

HAMS—"perfectly sweet"................................3½d.      "

A Choice lot of York and Irish Hams.

We give the public the full benefit of the reduction on "Tea."

GOOD BLACK AND MIXED TEA from 2s. 4d. per lb.

AT

W. H. BENNETT'S.

(One door below Clover Street.)

HIGH STREET, CHATHAM.

Chatham News
1867-02-28 host for the complimentary dinner to his brother Henry, at the Railway Tavern, Northfleet, Kent Maidstone Journal and Kentish Advertiser, 1867-03-02
1870-02-26 grocer, of High Street, Chatham Chatham News
1870-12-02 of 261 High-street, Chatham, at the date of his wife's death Maidstone Journal and Kentish Advertiser, 1870-12-12
1871 grocer employing 1 boy, widr, living with his family and sister-in-law in High St, Chatham RG 10/910 f35 p1
1876 grocer, of High-street, Chatham; co-executor of his brother's will National Probate Calendar
1877 Q4 m. 2. Emma S. Westlake (cal 1843 – ?, b. Pembroke), Medway RD RG 11/893 f158 p8; GRO index
1881 grocer, living with his wife and father-in-law at 68 New Road, Chatham RG 11/893 f158 p8
1886-12-31 grocer and provision merchant, of New Road, Chatham; adjudicated bankrupt Yorkshire Post and Intelligencer, 1887-01-01
1887-05-04 provision merchant, of Chatham; notice of a dividend of 1s 7¾d Public Ledger and Daily Advertiser
1891 agent, boarding with his daughter in 3 rooms at 1 [Station Road], Gillingham, Kent RG 12/661 f10 p14
1901 retired grocer, widower, living with his daughter at 29 Station Rd, Gillingham; two visitors present RG 13/733 p49 p16
1903 Q2 d. 29 Station Rd, Gillingham GRO index; Kent burials
1903-05-31 bur. Grange Road Cemetery, Gillingham Kent burials


11. Martha Ann Bennett

cal 1827 b. Kent censuses; Kent baptisms
1827-12-26 of Chatham, Kent; bapt. St Mary's, Chatham Kent baptisms
1841 living with her family in Rhode St, Chatham TNA: HO 107/487/4 f23 p12
1851 housekeeper, living with her brother, sister, one servant, and a lodger at 51 Queen St, Milton next Gravesend, Kent TNA: HO 107/1608 f206 p9
1852-10-14 m. John Braddy Jessup (1830–1871, b. Gravesend, s. of James and Sophia Jessup), at Holy Trinity, Milton next Gravesend TNA: RG 9/470 f126 p12; RG 10/891 f31 p1; GRO index; Kent marriages and banns; Kent baptisms
Children: Ellen Martha (1853–1943, b. Gravesend), John James (1856–1856), Martha Ann (1857–1917, b. Chatham), Herbert John (1860–1887, b. Rochester), Sophia (1862 – after 1871, b. Rochester), William Henry (1862–1894, b. Rochester), John James (1864–1941, b. Chatham) censuses; GRO index; National Probate Calendar
1861 living with her daughter, brother, niece, and two servants at "Swan", 173 Parrock St, Milton, Gravesend RG 9/470 f126 p12
1871 living with her family and two lodgers, in Parrock St, Milton, Gravesend RG 10/891 f31 p1
1871-05-26 husband formerly of the 'Britannia' Inn, Bath-street, but late of 35 Parrock-street, both in Gravesend, at the date of his death National Probate Calendar
1871-07-08 admon with will granted at the Principal Register to Martha Ann Jessup of 35 Parrock-street, widow, the relict, the universal legatee for life
1872-03-08 at Gravesend Petty Sessions: license of the Rose and Crown, Windmill-street, transferred from Alfred Beard to Mrs. Martha Ann Jessup Maidstone Journal and Kentish Advertiser, 1872-03-11
1874-09-09 of the Rose and Crown; license renewed after being cautioned, following having been conviced for allowing gambling Maidstone Journal and Kentish Advertiser, 1874-09-12
1881 formerly licensed victualler, living with her daughter and granddaughter at 12 Wellington St, Milton in Gravesend RG 11/871 f101 p6
1891 living on her own means, with two of her sons, at 59 Peacock Street, Milton, Gravesend RG 12/645 f104 p9
1901 living with her daughter and son-in-law at 14 Watcombe Ter., Enfield, Middlesex RG 13/1273 f99 p17
1908 Q2 d. Edmonton RD GRO index


12. Alfred Richard Bennett

cal 1831 b. Chatham, Kent TNA: HO 107/1611 f156 p31; Kent baptisms
1831-04-24 of Chatham; bapt. St Mary's, Chatham Kent baptisms
1841 living at the Little George, High Street, Chatham, apparently with the family of his sister Eleanor TNA: HO 107/407/3 f39 p7 [age given as 7]
1851 shipwright ap, living with his parents at 7 Rhode St, Chatham HO 107/1611 f156 p31
1855-11-04 m. Amelia Mary Ann Tuck (1831–1898, b. Yarmouth, Norfolk, d. of John and Mary Ann Tuck), All Saints, Frindsbury, Kent RG 10/907 f95 p8; GRO index; Kent marriages and banns
Children: Alfred James (1857–1903), b. Chatham; Henry (1860 – after 1879), Eleanor Amelia (1865–1944), Minnie (1870 – after 1895), Florence Maud (1875–1937), all b. Gillingham, Kent censuses; GRO index
1861 shipwright, living with his family at 14 Fox Street, Gillingham RG 9/480 f53 p3
1871 shipwright, living with his family at 33 Charlton St, New Brompton, Kent RG 10/907 f96 p8
1881 shipwright, living with his family and parents-in-law at 65 Saxton St, New Brompton RG 11/891 f96 p8
1891 shipwright, employed, living with his family and a granddaughter in 4 rooms at 65 Saxton St, New Brompton RG 12/660 f113 p7
1901 shipwright pension, living with his granddaughter at 65 Saxton St, New Brompton RG 13/735  f106 p17
1904 Q3 d. Medway RD GRO index


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