Children of Henry and Hannah Brady

01. Dr George Stewardson Brady, LSA, MD, MRCS, FRS

1832-04-18 b. Gateshead, Durham TNA: PRO RG 6/404; censuses
1841 living with his family in High Street, Gateshead, with three female servants, a governess, an assistant surgeon, and a surgeon ap. PRO HO 107/296/15 f46 p24
1843/1845 of Gateshead; at Ackworth School Ackworth School Centenary Committee (1879) List of the Boys and Girls Admitted into Ackworth School 1779 – 1879. London
1851 surgeon's app., of High Street, Gateshead, living with his family, a groom, two house servants, and an assistant surgeon HO 107/2402 f223 p46
1852-07-24 entered the examination held to determine the award of an exhibition of the Newcastle-upon-Tyne College of Medicine Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury, 1852-08-28
1852-08-07

The first exhibition of the Newcastle-upon-Tyne College of Medicine in connection with the University of Durham, value £15 per annum, and tenable for two years, has been awarded to George Stewardson Brady, of Gateshead.

Newcastle Journal
shortly before 1853-05-07 passed the examination in the science and practice of medicine, at Apothecaries' Hall, London, and received his certificate to practise Newcastle Journal, 1853-05-07
1869-09-28 surgeon, of Sunderland; m. Ellen Wright (cal 1834 – 1911, b. Chesterfield, Derbyshire, d. of Robert Wright, iron merchant, and his wife Sarah), at Chesterfield fmh GRO index; censuses; Annual Monitor; Derbyshire Times and Chesterfield Herald, 1859-10-01
Children: Alice (1861 – after 1901), Emily (1862–1941), Florence (1864–1952), David Stewardson (1867 – ?), and Llewellyn Stewardson (1868–1921), all b. Sunderland GRO index; censuses
1861 surgeon in general practice, MRCS Eng, of 247 High Street, Bishopwearmouth, Durham, living with his family, a general servant, and a nurse maid RG 9/3771 f76 p63
1871 surgeon, of 22 Fawcett Street, Bishopwearmouth, living with his family, a nurse maid, and a domestic servant RG 10/5004 f36 p65
1876 LSA and MD, St Andrews Wikipedia
1881 doctor of medicine, living at 22 Fawcett Street, Bishopwearmouth, with his family, a cook, and a housemaid RG 11/4993 f6 p5
1882 elected FRS Wikipedia
1887-10-15 MD, FRS, FLS, professor of Nat. Hist. at the Durham College of Science Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer
1889-04-18 MD, St Andrews University, conferred in absentia Morning Post, 1889-04-19
1891-02-19 of Mowbray Villas, Sunderland, Durham, M.D.; co-executor of the will of his brother Henry Bowman Brady National Probate Calendar
1891 MD, genl regd practitioner, living in Burton Rd, Bishopwearmouth, with his family, a cook, and a housemaid RG 12/4134 f15 p24
1896 living with his wife at Mowbray Villas, Sunderland Proceedings of the Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, Part XV, Eighth Month, 1896
1901 professor in College of Science, worker, of Mowbray Villa, Burdon Rd, Sunderland, living with his wife, his daughter Emily, a cook, and a housemaid RG 13/4716 f99 p16; Proceedings of the Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, Part XX, Eighth Month, 1901
1901-11-06 MD; co-executor of the will of Jane Carins National Probate Calendar
1911 doctor of medicine—retired, living in 13 rooms at 9 Endcliffe Grove Avenue, Sheffield, with his wife, a cook, and a housemaid RG14PN27750 RG78PN1588 RD509 SD2 ED30 SN190
  professor of natural history at the Hancock Museum in Newcastle-upon-Tyne; author of the 3-volume A Monograph of the Free and Semi-parasitic Copepoda of the British Isles for the Ray Society in 1880, but also publishing on the Challenger copepods and collections from different national expeditions; worked mainly on 'entomostracans'[Bradya Boeck, 1872, Bradyidius Giesbrecht, 1897, Bradycalanus A. Scott, 1909, Bradyetes Farran, 1905, Bradycinetus Sars, 1866, Bradycypris G.O. Sars, 1924, Bradypontius Giesbrecht, 1895, Bathycalanus bradyi (Wolfenden, 1905), Undinopsis bradyi G.O. Sars, 1884, Pareuchaeta bradyi (With, 1915), Scolecithrix bradyi Giesbrecht, 1888, Centropages bradyi Wheeler, 1899, Cervinia bradyi Brady, 1878 ex Norman MS, Peltobradya Mιdioni & Soyer, 1967, Neobradya T. Scott, 1892, Antarcticobradya Huys, 1987, Phyllopodopsyllus bradyi (T. Scott, 1892), Sarsicytheridea bradii (Norman, 1865), Bythocythere bradyi G.O. Sars, 1926, Sclerochilus bradyi Rudjakov, 1962, Paradoxostoma bradyi G.O. Sars, 1928, Diastylis bradyi Norman, 1879, Ilyocypris bradyi G.O. Sars, 1890, Coronida bradyi (A. Milne-Edwards, 1869), Bradyidius bradyi (G.O. Sars, 1884), Cycloleberis bradyi ] Biographical Etymology of Marine Organism Names
  achieved international recognition for his work on Ostracoda Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
1921-12-25 of Parkhurst, Endcliffe Grove Avenue, Sheffield; d. Ecclesall Bierlow RD GRO index; National Probate Calendar
1922-03-10 will proved at London by Emily Brady, spinster, and Jonathan Barber, solicitor; effects £22,430 3s. 2d. National Probate Calendar

WELL-KNOWN SCIENTIST LEAVES £22,430.

The late Professor George Stewardson Brady, Parkhurst, Endcliffe Grove avenue, Sheffield, formerly practising in medicine in Sunderland and honorary physician to the Sunderland Royal Infirmary, and for over 30 years professor of natural history at Armstrong College, Newcastle, who dies on 25 December last, aged 89 years, left estate of the gross value of £22,430 3s. 2d., with net personalty £18,971 11. 9d.

Probate of his will dated 23 May last has been granted to his daughter, Miss Emily Brady, of the same address, and Mr. Jonathan Barber, solicitor, 29, Bank Street, Sheffield. The testator left £500 to his daughter Mrs. Alice Atkin, stating that she was otherwise well provide for, and he left the residue of his property as to three-fourths to his daughter Emily Brady, and one fourth to his daughter, Florence Hubbersty or her issue.

Sheffield Independent, 1922-03-15
 

GEORGE STEWARDSON BRADY, 1832—1921.

G. S. Brady, M.D., M.R.C.S, D.Sc., LL.D., F.R.S., C.M.Z.S., Professor of Natural History, Armstrong College, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, and Consulting Physician to the Sunderland Infirmary, was born, he told me, April 18th, 1832. Presumably also on his authority we learn that the event occurred at Gateshead, and that he was the eldest son of Henry Brady, surgeon.

As his childish education began at the Friends' School, Ackworth, it is not improbable that he owed the name Stewardson to his parents' acquaintance with the Quaker family which gave the popular portrait painter of that name to the early part of the nineteenth century. Certainly the whole tenor of Brady's life seems to have been in tune with the principles of that peace-loving community, and even on the scientific side there are many indications that friendship was his delight. It has been already explained in 'Nature' (January 5th, 1922), among other details, that he became a member of the Tyneside Naturalists' Field Club in 1849. At that early period it is said that his interest was "with algae and other plant groups." Much later on he referred to these studies when pointing out in correspondence (November, 1902), that the organisms which I had described as gland-cells in the amphipod genus Urotlm, were, in fact, " parasites, probably algae."

With the Natural History Society of Northumberland, Durham, and Newcastle-upon-Tyne, of which the Tyneside Field Club was a branch, Brady had a long and distinguished connexion, both as a frequent contributor to its 'Transactions,' and twice President of the Field Club. The respect felt for him by fellow-workers in systematic zoology may be partially traced by the use of his name in classification. Thus among Copepoda Axel, Boeck names a genus Bradya in 1872, Thomas Scott supplies Neobradya in 1892, Giesbrecht Bradypontius in 1895, and Bradyidius in 1897, Vanhoffen Bradyanus in the same year, and G. O. Sars Pseudobradya in 1904. Sars had named a genus Bradycinetus in 1865. But this suggests a curious need for caution in that many generic names owe the commencing syllables Brady-, not to eminent zoologists, but to the Greek βραδύ, indicating some organic slowness, and very inappropriate to the scientific activities of George Brady and his brother Henry. For the use of the former's name in identifying species, his friend A. M. Norman led the way with the Ostracode Cythere Bradii in 1864. But this, for technical reasons, gave way to another species, the Marquis de Folin's Cythere Bradii in 1869. Norman, in 1878, named a Copepod Cervinia Bradyi, Sars in 1884 another of that group Undinopsis Bradyi, and Thomas Scott a third in 1892 as Tetragoniceps Bradyi, but this, later on, he found reason to place in a new genus with the long-flowing name of Phyllopodopsyllus, strictly meaning "a leaf-footed flea," the species being notable for "the large size and leaf-like form of the fifth pair of thoracic feet of the female." In a footnote to Tetragoniceps Bradyi, Dr. Thomas Scott remarks, "the name is given in compliment to Prof. G. S. Brady, who instituted the genus, and to whose untiring and disinterested kindness the author of these notes owes much of his success in the study of the Entomostraca." In 1879 Dr. Norman again pays his friend the compliment of using his name for a species, this time in the eccentric group of the Sympoda, to which he adds the description of Diastylis Bradyi.

In the previous year the Ray Society had published the first volume of Brady's "Monograph of the free and semi-parasitic Copepoda of the British Islands." As the uninitiated may be excused for wondering why men of ability should spend a considerable part of their lives in studying creatures so insignificant in size and so generally harmless to mankind, as the Entomostraca, it may be observed that, as in old Camden's phrase, "many a little makes a mickle," and as little grains of sand may make a mountain, so the stupendous multitudes in which some of the entomostracan species occur make them indirectly yet ultimately important contributors to human food and comfort. But, apart from economic values, the true lover of nature finds in this seemingly trivial study more than one source of aesthetic fascination. In the introduction to Brady's last-mentioned work he says:— "Some of the pleasantest and most profitable hours which I have ever spent have been when, after a day's dredging, I have set out at sunset on a quiet boating excursion for the purpose of capturing such prey as could be got in the surface net. Many hours of this kind, spent in the company of my old friend Mr. David Robertson, amongst the Scilly Islands, on the Firth of Clyde, on the sheltered bays of Roundstone and Westport, or on the stormier coasts of Northumbria, will long live in my memory, not only by their results in the acquisition of valuable specimens, but as times of unalloyed delight in the contemplation of nature under a different guise from that in which we usually see her." The David Robertson to whom he here alludes, otherwise known as "the Naturalist of Cumbrae " (see his 'Life by his Friend,' 1891), began a notable career as a penniless herdboy, and ended it an Hon. LL.D. of Glasgow University.

In the bibliography to his luminous work on the Ostracoda of the Bay of Naples and the adjacent seas (1894), G. W. Muller enumerates twenty-one contributions by Brady to this branch of Carcinology, together with seven others in which his was the leading name in a collaboration. Five of these were undertaken with David Robertson, one with Norman, and one with Crosskey and Robertson together. When the first volume of the "Challenger" Reports on Zoology was published in 1880 under the editorship of Sir C. Wyville-Thomson, Brady was already a recognised authority on the Ostracoda. He was among those specially consulted as to the disposal of the vast "Challenger " material, and his was the third memoir to appear. It was illustrated by forty-four quarto plates. For the comparative fewness of new species he explains that the "work of the 'Challenger' gave us no collections whatever from between tide marks, nor from the laminarian zone, and these two zones usually swarm with microzoic life of all kinds." A later work of much importance was that which he carried out in partnership with Canon Norman on "The Marine and Freshwater Ostracoda of the North Atlantic and of North-Western Europe," the first part appearing in 1889, the second in 1896. In this he gives a signal example of his scientific ingenuity which is worthy of additional record. He points out (p. 622) that "In consequence of the small size of Ostracoda it is extremely difficulty to procure spirit-preserved specimens from the deep sea, and although the Myodocopa, being much larger than the Podocopa, would be detected by the experienced eye of a Carcinologist who had studied them, yet the Zoologists usually attached to Government Expeditions cannot be expected thus to notice them. Hence it is that in a large number of cases the only examples which have come into our hands are such as have been picked out of dried material. It struck us that, notwithstanding their dried condition, it might yet be possible by maceration to get some idea of the withered inmates of the shells. We therefore made experiments, and succeeded in restoring the animals beyond our most ardent expectations. All the portions of the animals figured [in several genera and species mentioned] have been taken from dissections of animals which have been preserved in a dried state for very many, in one case, as long as twenty-three years, and we are satisfied that these drawings will be found to be almost as exact, so far as they go, as those taken from spirit-preserved examples."

In 1884, when the editing of the "Challenger" Reports had passed into the vigorous hands of John Murray, the eighth volume of Zoology appeared, having as its opening treatise Brady's Report on the Copepoda illustrated by fifty-five carefully drawn plates. Though the collection thus laboriously discussed presented many points of interest, Brady was forced to admit that it was far from representative of what the ocean's resources were likely to contain, and that the last word had not been said as to methods of preserving these organisms. In his Introduction he makes some remarks which bear on a subject previously mentioned:— "The appearance of these minute creatures at the surface depends upon conditions, the nature of which we scarcely at all understand. Night, on the whole, seems to be more favourable than daytime, but even during the day they sometimes appear in numbers so vast as to colour the sea in wide bands for distances of many miles. This appearance has been noticed, perhaps, most frequently in the tropics; but even in the Arctic seas some species, especially Calanus (Cetochilus) finmarchicus, are at times so abundant as to constitute, it is said, a most important item in the food of the whale. So far, indeed, as number and size of individuals are concerned, it would appear that the cold water of the Arctic and Antarctic seas are even more favourable to the growth of Copepoda than the warmer seas of the Tropics."

With his frequent and arduous contributions to scientific literature Brady combined, from 1857 till about 1890, the conscientious exercise of an exacting profession, practising as a doctor in Sunderland, " and after that gave up his time to his professorship at the Armstrong College, until he resigned in 1906 and .... came to live in Sheffield." His professorship he had held since 1875. He married in 1859 and had one son and three daughters, losing his wife ten years and his son one year before his own death. Two of his daughters are married to members of his own profession, one to Dr. Charles Atkin of Sheffield and another to Dr. R S. Hubbersty of Sunderland, the third remaining with her father to the close of his days. He died on Christmas evening, 1921. Till the last year of what he himself described as his long and happy life, he had never realised that he was old. Apart from science, his amusements had all been of a tranquil kind — gardening, photography, and the game of bowls. A friend, who had been reading over many of his writings, tells his daughter that: "Dominating all is the intense love he had for nature, religion, and poetry." Another friend, who often walked with him, tells her of the enjoyment derived from the humour, instruction, and high tone of his conversation. A long correspondence is in harmony with these touches of character.

A letter from Sheffield, dated June, 1915, shows him at eighty-three, away from necessary books, reluctant to undertake fresh work of importance, yet unable to be disobliging. He explains that he had declined an invitation to describe the Ostracoda and Copepoda collected by the Australasian Antarctic Expedition, 1911–1914, under Sir Douglas Mawson, but that the material had nevertheless been sent him, with further pressure. Now, the Scientific Records of that Expedition show that in Series C the fifth volume contains monographs on the Copepoda, the Cladocera, and Halocypridζ, by G. S. Brady. A fine finish!

T. R. R S.

Obituary notice from the Proceedings of the Royal Society, B. Vol. 93


02. Elizabeth Ann Brady

1833-11-02 b. Gateshead, Durham TNA: PRO RG 6/404, /1149; censuses
1841 living with her family in High Street, Gateshead, with three female servants, a governess, an assistant surgeon, and a surgeon ap. PRO HO 107/296/15 f46 p24
1844/1847 of Gateshead; at Ackworth School Ackworth School Centenary Committee (1879) List of the Boys and Girls Admitted into Ackworth School 1779 – 1879. London
1847-08/1849-06 of York; at The Mount School The Mount School, York. List of Teachers and Scholars 1784–1816, 1831–1906. 1906, York: Sessions
1851 at home, of High Street, Gateshead, living with her family, a groom, two house servants, and an assistant surgeon HO 107/2402 f223 p46
1861 visitor with Charles J. Pattison, bank cashier, and his wife, of 170 (Bank) High Street, Bishopwearmouth, Durham RG 9/3775 f72 p1
1871 of 60 & 62 High Street, Gateshead, living with her family, a housemaid, a cook, and another general practitioner RG 10/5056 f4 p2
1872 Q1 m. William Ebenezer Marshall (1824–1880, mechanical engineer, b. Kendal, Westmorland, s. of Samuel and Hannah (Tipping) Marshall), in Stockton RD GRO index; RG 6/873; censuses; Annual Monitor
married in Switzerland, it being then illegal to marry a deceased wife's sister Charles Brady of Barnsley, citing Notes by Nora Brady
1881 widow, living with her stepson, a cook, and a housemaid, in North Hill Road, Headingley cum Burley, Yorkshire RG 11/4538 f45 p10
1891 living on own means, of 17 Lansdowne Rd, Kensington, London, living with her (step)son, her niece Florence Brady, a cook, and a housemaid RG 12/22 f73 p22
1901 living on own means, living with her stepson at 17 Lansdowne Road, Kensington, with a housemaid, a cook, and a visiting Henry Watson RG 13/23 f111 p30
1911 living with her stepson, a cook, and a housemaid, in 13 rooms at 17 Lansdowne Road, Kensington RG 14/162 RD2 ED21
1922-04-12 of 17 Lansdowne-road, Notting Hill, Middlesex; d. Kensington RD GRO index; National Probate Calendar
1922-05-10 will proved at London by Ernest William Marshall, architect; effects £1119 13s. 11d. National Probate Calendar


03. Dr Henry Bowman Brady, PhD, FRS, FLS, FRGS (Harry)

1835-02-23 b. Gateshead, Durham TNA: PRO RG 6/404, /1149; GRO index; censuses
1841 living with his family in High Street, Gateshead, with three female servants, a governess, an assistant surgeon, and a surgeon ap. PRO HO 107/296/15 f46 p24
1845/1849 of Gateshead; at Ackworth School Ackworth School Centenary Committee (1879) List of the Boys and Girls Admitted into Ackworth School 1779 – 1879. London
  also educated at the Quaker school at Tulketh Hall, near Preston, Lancashire; "the moral values of the Religious Society of Friends, inculcated in him at an early age, were to remain with him throughout his life" Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
1850 left school
1851 one of two chemist's apprentices in the household of Thomas Harvey, chemist and druggist, of 13 Briggate, Leeds, Yorkshire HO 107/2321 f282 p4
1855 went on to study pharmacy in what was later to become the Newcastle College of Medicine, and, on graduating in 1855, set himself up as a pharmacist in Newcastle upon Tyne; his energy and organizational ability were soon evident Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
1855/1876 naturalist and pharmacist / pharmaceutical chemist, Brady and Martin, of Newcastle-upon-Tyne
1859 elected a fellow of the Linnaean Society
1860-10-01 re the Newcastle College of Medicine: "Mr Henry Bowman Brady has accepted the joint lectureship in botany with Mr Thornhill, subject to the nomination  of the Warden and Senate, and the approval of the Convocation of the University" Durham County Advertiser, 1860-10-05
1861 pharmaceutical chemist, of 60 & 62 High Street, Gateshead, living with his family, a cook, a housemaid, a coachman, a boarder, and a visiting Emma S. Watson RG 9/3801 f35 p23
1864/1870 largely responsible for the foundation of the British Pharmaceutical Congress and served as its treasurer in this period Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
1864 elected a fellow of the Geological Society
from the 1860s published papers on Foraminifera (Protozoa); significant milestones in his early foraminiferological career were the publications of monographs on the genera Loftusia and Parkeria, with William Benjamin Carpenter in 1869, and on Permo-Carboniferous non-fusulines, in 1876; his philosophical trademark was a broad concept of the species and of intraspecific variability, and an associated conservatism in the establishment of new specific names
1872-08-22 witness to the marriage of his cousin Alice Brady, at Barnsley marriage register
1871 of 60 & 62 High Street, Gateshead, living with his family, a housemaid, a cook, and another general practitioner RG 10/5056 f4 p2
1872/1873 president of the British Pharmaceutical Congress Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
  also served on the council of the Pharmaceutical Society and was a member of its board of examiners; did much to promote the scientific education of pharmaceutical chemists, and was instrumental in transforming the Pharmaceutical Journal (to which he was a regular contributor) from a monthly to a weekly publication; received many accolades from his professional colleagues, and was elected honorary member of the American Pharmaceutical Association, the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, and the pharmaceutical societies of St Petersburg and Vienna
1874 FRS
1876 retired from business to devote the remainder of his life to the full-time study of Foraminifera
1878 visited Fez and the interior of Morocco Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser, 1891-01-22
1881 pharmaceutical chemist, living at Hillfield House, Union Lane, Gateshead, with his father, a cook, and a housemaid RG 11/5033 f46 p33
1884 published the seminal Report on the Foraminifera Dredged by HMS Challenger. "The text, written in a delightfully idiosyncratic style, set new standards of comprehensive presentation of information, while the colour plates, whose production was personally supervised by Brady, are of a standard of accuracy and artistry rarely matched before or since." Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
1887 appointed as corresponding member of the Imperial Geological Institute of Vienna and an honorary member of the Royal Bohemian Museum, Prague, and in 1887 received a gold medal from the Austrian emperor Franz Joseph I for services to the Imperial (Hof) Museum in Vienna, to which, through his colleague Felix Karrer, he sent a set of slides of Foraminifera from the Austro-Hungarian north pole expedition (dealt with in the Challenger report)
1888 served on the Council of the Royal Society
joined the Zoological Society
1888-03-03 received honorary LLD from the University of Aberdeen Dundee Courier, 1888-03-05; Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
  something of a gentleman traveller and journeyed twice around the world; his interest in the flora and fauna he encountered frequently prompted him to write short pieces Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
1889/1890 on his last overseas trip, fell seriously ill with dropsy; on his return, he took up residence in Bournemouth
  "His personal and professional integrity and stoic fortitude in the face of chronic ill health were combined with a sense of humour that on occasion led him to desert his usual staid demeanour and endeared him to his friends."
  the highest award of the Micropalaeontological Society is named in honour of George Stewardson and Henry Bowman Brady in recognition of their outstanding pioneering studies in micropalaeontology and natural history information from Charles E.G. Pease
1891-01-10 gentleman, of 4 Robert-street, Adelphi, Middlesex; d. at the Mansion Hotel, Bournemouth, Hampshire, of bronchitis and emphysema GRO index; Annual Monitor; Oxford Dictionary of National Biography; National Probate Calendar

MR. H.B. BRADY.

The death of Mr Henry Bowman Brady, F.R.S., LL.D., is announced. He was born in Gateshead on February 23rd, 1835, and was the son of the late Mr Henry Brady, who for fifty years carried on an extensive practice as a surgeon in that town. The father in the intervals of his practice was devoted to the study of natural history, and especially of botany, and instilled into his son a love of nature, which was further nurtured by his first school. H.B. Brady's education was continued at Ackworth School, in Yorkshire, and at Tulketh Hall, near Preston. On leaving school he was apprenticed to the late Thomas Harvey of Leeds as a pharmaceutical chemist, and on the completion of his apprenticeship, he studied under Dr Thomas Richardson (the late Professor Marreco being a fellow-student) in the laboratory which afterwards became the chemical department of the College of Physical Science. He passed the examinations of the Pharmaceutical Society, and opened business in December, 1855, as a pharmaceutical chemist at 40, Mosley Street. He carried on the business at No. 40 and No. 29 until December, 1876, when he was succeeded by Mr N.H. Martin. During those 21 years of his business life Mr Brady was closely identified with the Pharmaceutical Society. He was a member of the council of that society for several years, and at another period a member of the Board of Examiners. During the meeting of the British Association in Newcastle in 1863 Mr Brady made the first move towards the establishment of the British Pharmaceutical Conference, and of this body he was President at the meetings at Brighton in 1872 and at Bradford in 1873. In 1874 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society, and in 1888 was made a member of the council of that body. During the last years that Mr Brady was in business as a pharmacist he collected the materials and wrote his classical Monograph of Carboniferous and Permian Foraminifera, which was published by the Paleontographical Society in 1876. Most Englishmen are probably aware of the scientific cruise of H.M.S. Challenger during the years 1873 to 1876, but beside a few newspaper paragraphs they are not perhaps quite so well informed as to what became of the enormous mass of material collected for scientific investigation during those years. Under the direction of a special staff of scientific men the dredgings were sorted and handed over to specialists in each department of Natural History. The work which Mr H.B. Brady had done in connection with the subject of foraminifera pointed to him as the most suitable person to be entrusted with this branch, and in 1878 he commenced his researches, with the result that in May of 1882 he sent in his first batch of manuscript, and in June, 1884, it was completed. The report is embodied in two quarto volumes, the one containing 814 pages of text, and the other 114 plates of unrivalled artistic excellence as well as of scientific accuracy. In 1888, in recognition of his scientific work, he was elected an LL.D. of the University of Aberdeen, and in addition to other distinctions and honours by various scientific bodies, he was in the same year presented with a gold medal by the Emperor of Austria, in recognition of valuable assistance rendered to the National Museum.

Newcastle Courant, 1891-01-17
1891-01 bur. Jesmond old cemetery, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland Find a Grave; Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
1891-02-19 will proved at the Principal Registry by George Stewardson Brady, of Mowbray Villas, Sunderland, Durham, M.D., the brother, and Thomas Carrick Watson, of 83 Osborne-road, Newcastle, grocer, the executors; personal estate £7799 14s. 6d. National Probate Calendar
1891-07 resworn £7840 13s. 4d.
  bequeathed £1000 to the Durham College of Science, Newcastle Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1891-02-18
  See also C.G. Adams, 'Henry Bowman Brady, 1835–1891'  


04. Thomas Brady, JP

1837-01-13 b. Gateshead, Durham TNA: PRO RG 6/404, /1149; GRO index; censuses
1841 living with his family in High Street, Gateshead, with three female servants, a governess, an assistant surgeon, and a surgeon ap. PRO HO 107/296/15 f46 p24
1846/1850 of Gateshead; at Ackworth School Ackworth School Centenary Committee (1879) List of the Boys and Girls Admitted into Ackworth School 1779 – 1879. London
1851 scholar, of Tulketh Hall, Ashton, Lancashire HO 107/2268 f550 p2
  apprenticed to a printer and bookbinder in Newcastle upon Tyne Edward H. Milligan (2007) Biographical Dictionary of British Quakers in Commerce and Industry 1775–1920. York: Sessions Book Trust
1858 on completion of his apprenticeship, moved to York, taking over the printing, stationary and bookselling business of William Simpson; continued the business until the end of 1864
1858-07-01

WILLIAM SIMPSON,

BOOKSELLER, STATIONER, & PRINTER,

IN returning his bet Thanks to his Friends and the Public for their kind Support during his residence in York, respectfully intimates that he has TRANSFERRED his BUSINESS to THOMAS BRADY of NEWCASTLE-ON-TYNE, for whom he ventures to solicit a Continuance of the Liberal Patronage bestowed on himself.

15, Low Ousegate, York, 7th Mo., 1858.


THOMAS BRADY,

On Succeeding to the Business hitherto carried on by

WILLIAM SIMPSON, as

BOOKSELLER, STATIONER, PRINTER, &c.,

RESPECTFULLY solicits from his Friends and the Public a Continuance of the Support which has been so liberally bestowed on his Predecessor.

T.B. has for several years been engaged in acquiring a thorough knowledge of the Business in its various branches, and he trusts, by constant attention and diligent personal superintendence, to ensure satisfaction in the execution of Orders entrusted to him.

It will be an object of T.B.'s especial care to keep on hand a good assortment of Standard Works, as well as a judicious selection from the most Recent Publications.

T.B.'s Stock of Stationery will, he believes, be found adapted to meet the requirements of all Classes, whether for private or business purposes, and he would inform Tradesmen that his particular attention has been directed to the Manufacture of Account Books and Commercial Stationery of every description.

INVOICES, CIRCULARS, &c., Engrave, Lithographed, or Printed.

AGENT FOR THE LONDON STEREOSCOPIC COMPANY.

15, Low Ousegate, York, 7th Month 1st, 1858.

Yorkshire Gazette, 1858-07-10
c. 1860 got engaged Milligan (2007)
1861 bookseller, living with his mother and a servant at 4 Mount Terrace, St Mary Bishophill, York, Yorkshire RG 9/3548 f14 p23
1864 sold his business to William Sessions, then moved to Middlesbrough, joining a firm of shipbuilders (perhaps Richards, Duck & Co.) Milligan (2007)
1866-01-03 m.1. Jane Nicholson (1839–1874, b. Chelmsford, Essex, d. of Henry and Ann Nicholson), in Chelmsford RD GRO index; censuses; Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, Annual Reports
Children: Nora (1866–1955), b. Middlesbrough, Yorkshire; Henry Nicholson (1868–1949), Helen (1869 – after 1930), Roger (1872–1957), and Wilfred Bowman (1874–1974), all b. Jarrow, Durham
1871 estate agent, of 67 Croft Ter., Hedworth Monkton & Jarrow, Durham, living with his family, a general servant, and a nursemaid RG 10/5043 f64 p30
by 1872 established at Jarrow as a surveyor and land agent Milligan (2007)
1876-09-13 of Jarrow Hall, Jarrow-on-Tyne; m.2. Sarah Jane Wright (1836–1900, b. Chesterfield, Derbyshire, d. of Robert and Sarah Wright), at Matlock Bank "England Marriages, 1538–1973 ," database, FamilySearch: 10 December 2014, Thomas Brady and Sarah Jane Wright, 13 Sep 1876, citing Matlock Bank, England, reference it 1; FHL microfilm 2,082,455; Milligan (2007); Derbyshire Courier, 1876-09-16
1881 agent for Jarrow Estate and JP, living at Jarrow Hall, Hedworth Monkton and Jarrow, Durham, with his family and two domestic servants RG 11/5021 f37 p16
1886-03-17 presiding officer, Jarrow East Ward, in the Jarrow School Board election Shields Daily Gazette, 1886-03-18
1891 estate agent, employed, living at Jarrow Hall, Hedworth Monkton and Jarrow, with his family, a housemaid, and a cook RG 12/4164 f121 p19
1896 living at The Hall, Jarrow, with his wife and all his children except Henry Proceedings of the Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, Part XV, Eighth Month, 1896
1900 of Jarrow-on-Tyne, Durham Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, Annual Report, 1901
1901 estate agent, worker, of The Hall, Jarrow, living with his family, a housemaid, a cook, and a visitor; and adjacent 3-room property, occupied by a gardener and his wife, seems to be part of The Hall household RG 13/4740 f5 p1; Proceedings of the Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, Part XX, Eighth Month, 1901
  agent to Mr D.O. Drewett Lancashire Evening Post, 1920-07-19
1905-10-17 of Cleadon, near Sunderland; m.3. Kate Ridett Oddie (1866–1935, b. Rawtenstall, Lancashire, d. of Edwin and Emily Ann (Ridett) Oddie), at Garstang RO and Calder Bridge fmh Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, Annual Reports 23–26, 1904/1907
1909 of Cleadon, near Sunderland Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, Annual Report 29, 1910/1911
1911 retired estate agent, living in 10 rooms at Hillfield, Cleadon, with his wife and a general servant RG 14/30344 RD556 ED85 SN46
  his Quaker involvement found expression in his service as clerk of Newcastle MM and of South Shields PM, and as an elder Milligan (2007)
1920-04-29 of 'Sunnyside', Lowther-street, Penrith, Cumberland; d. there Annual Monitor; National Probate Calendar
1920-07-12 will proved at London by Roger Brady, marine optician; effects £10,126 18s. 9d National Probate Calendar
  net personalty £8586 Lancashire Evening Post, 1920-07-19


05. Mary Brady

1838-04-23 b. Gateshead, Durham GRO index; censuses; Margaret Page (December 1994) 'The Brady Bible', Quaker Connections 3:19–23
1841 living with her family in High Street, Gateshead, with three female servants, a governess, an assistant surgeon, and a surgeon ap. TNA: PRO HO 107/296/15 f46 p24
1848/1851 of Gateshead; at Ackworth School Ackworth School Centenary Committee (1879) List of the Boys and Girls Admitted into Ackworth School 1779 – 1879. London
1851 scholar, of Ackworth School, Ackworth, Yorkshire HO 107/2331 f59 p15
1861 of 60 & 62 High Street, Gateshead, living with her family, a cook, a housemaid, a coachman, a boarder, and a visiting Emma S. Watson PRO RG 9/3801 f35 p23
1867-02-20 m. William Ebenezer Marshall (1824–1880, mechanical engineer, b. Kendal, Westmorland, s. of Samuel and Hannah (Tipping) Marshall), in Sunderland RD GRO index; RG 6/873; censuses
Child: Ernest William (1868–1934), b. Leeds, Yorkshire GRO index; censuses
1868-04-01 of Leeds; d. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland GRO index; Annual Monitor


06. Hannah Brady

1840-09-14 b. Gateshead, Durham GRO index; censuses; Margaret Page (December 1994) 'The Brady Bible', Quaker Connections 3:19–23; Find a Grave
1841 living with her family in High Street, Gateshead, with three female servants, a governess, an assistant surgeon, and a surgeon ap. TNA: PRO HO 107/296/15 f46 p24
1851 not found in census  
1851/1855 of Gateshead; at Ackworth School Ackworth School Centenary Committee (1879) List of the Boys and Girls Admitted into Ackworth School 1779 – 1879. London
1861 of 60 & 62 High Street, Gateshead, living with her family, a cook, a housemaid, a coachman, a boarder, and a visiting Emma S. Watson PRO RG 9/3801 f35 p23
1869-11-18 m. Thomas Carrick Watson (1840–1918, b. Gateshead, s. of William Wigham and Mary (Carrick) Watson), at Staindrop fmh, Durham minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting, MF 170, Tyne & Wear Archives Service; censuses; Milligan (2007); Newcastle Courant, 1869-11-26

Marriage at the Friends' Meeting House.

—A marriage was solemnized at the Friend's Meeting House, Staindrop, on Thursday the 18th inst., between Mr Thomas Carrick Watson, of Newcastle-on-Tyne, and Miss Hannah Brady, daughter of Mr Henry Brady, of Gateshead. At the time appointed (10 o'clock), the meeting house was pretty well filled. Mr Brady gave a short address, and the ceremony was then proceeded with, at the conclusion of which, the marriage contract was read by Mr Hanson of Staindrop and duly signed by the bride and bridegroom. The happy couple, accompanied by their parents and friends then returned to the Head Inn, from which place they shortly afterwards departed for their various homes.

Teesdale Mercury, 1869-12-01
Children: Mary Constance (1870–1946, b. Newcastle), Lilian (1872–1971, b. Gateshead), Henry Bowman (1875–1970, b. Gateshead) censuses; GRO index; National Probate Calendar; Old York Scholars' Association (1971) Bootham School Register. London: Oyez Press; Edward H. Milligan (2007) Biographical Dictionary of British Quakers in Commerce and Industry 1775–1920. York: Sessions Book Trust; Page (1994); Find a Grave
1871 living with her husband, daughter, a domestic servant, and a nurse, at 15 Levaine Crescent, St Andrews, Newcastle on Tyne, Northumberland RG 10/5084 f60 p22
1881 living at 16 Bewick Road, Gateshead, with her family and two servants RG 11/5034 f125 p55
1891 living at 83 Osborne Rd, Jesmond, Newcastle on Tyne, Northumberland, with her family, a cook, and a housemaid RG 12/4219 f6 p5
1901 grocer, employer, living at Glenbrae, Jesmond Park West, Heaton, Northumberland, with her family, a housemaid, and a cook RG 13/4794 f89 p28; Proceedings of the Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, Part XX, Eighth Month, 1901
1911 living at Plumtree Hall, Heversham, Milnthorpe, Westmorland, with her family, a cook, a waiting maid, and a housemaid; 17 rooms RG14PN31665 RG78PN1821 RD581 SD4 ED6 SN119
1924-01-23 of Plumtree Hall, Heversham, Milnthorpe; d. Kendal RD GRO index; National Probate Calendar
  bur. Kendal fbg, Westmorland Find a Grave
1924-05-09 will proved at Carlisle by Henry Bowman Watson, grocer, Mary Constance Watson, and Lilian Watson; effects £2743 8s. 3d. National Probate Calendar


07. Alfred Brady

1842-04-11 b. Gateshead, Durham GRO index; Margaret Page (December 1994) 'The Brady Bible', Quaker Connections 3:19–23
1842-09-06 d. Gateshead RD GRO index; Margaret Page (December 1994) 'The Brady Bible', Quaker Connections 3:19–23; https://billiongraves.com/grave/Alfred-Brady/10104655
  bur. Westgate Hill Cemetery, 84 Westgate Rd, Newcastle upon Tyne Billion Graves


08. Sarah Jane Brady

1843-06-22 b. Gateshead RD GRO index; Annual Monitor; Margaret Page (December 1994) 'The Brady Bible', Quaker Connections 3:19–23
1847-06-01 of Gateshead; d. High Street, Gateshead GRO index; Annual Monitor; Margaret Page (December 1994) 'The Brady Bible', Quaker Connections 3:19–23; Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury, and Newcastle Journal, 1847-06-05; Durham Chronicle, 1847-06-11; Billion Graves
  bur. Westgate Hill Cemetery, 84 Westgate Rd, Newcastle upon Tyne Find a Grave; Billion Graves


09. Alfred Brady (Alf)

1846-12-23 b. Gateshead, Durham GRO index; censuses; Margaret Page (December 1994) 'The Brady Bible', Quaker Connections 3:19–23
1851 at home, of High Street, Gateshead, living with his family, a groom, two house servants, and an assistant surgeon HO 107/2402 f223 p46
1857/1861 of Gateshead; at Ackworth School Ackworth School Centenary Committee (1879) List of the Boys and Girls Admitted into Ackworth School 1779 – 1879. London
1861 scholar, of Queen Wood College, East & West Buckholt, Hampshire RG 9/687 f29 p24
1871 of 60 & 62 High Street, Gateshead, living with his family, a housemaid, a cook, and another general practitioner RG 10/5056 f4 p2
1874-08-11 m. Ellen Brown (1851–1927, b. Winlaton, Durham), in Gateshead RD GRO index; Bastin-Best Family History
1880-03-18 immigrated to Australia Bastin-Best Family History
Child: Harold Esmond (1891–1973), b. Essendon, Victoria Australia birth index; Bastin-Best Family History
1891-09-03 d. Esdon, Victoria, Australia Australia death index


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