The Wigham family of Coanwood

 

Joseph Watson = Rachel Wigham

     |         other children

Esther Watson = Joshua Watson

      |         other children

Joseph Watson = Sarah Spence

      |         other children

Robert Spence Watson = Elizabeth Richardson

      |         other children

Mary Spence Watson = Francis Edward Pollard

 

M17. RACHEL WATSON born WIGHAM

Rachel Wigham was born on the 12th June 1763, in Allendale, Northumberland.1

She married [M10] Joseph Watson on the 3rd July 1782, at Cornwood, Northumberland. Their children, all born in Northumberland (all but Hannah definitely born at Ryding, Allendale), were: Hannah (1784–1803), [M9] Esther (1786–1862), William (1788–1856), Rachel (1790–1850), and Joseph (1792–1822).2

She was called to the ministry about her 24th year. "Altho her Words were few, yet being savoury often administered Grace to those that heard. In private Life she was very exemplary", and she was a loving wife and affectionate mother.3

She was privileged with the nursing care of her valuable mother, who took up her residence in their family, and with whom she travelled as companion, in one of her last journeys, in the exercise of her ministry.4

She died on the 20th June 1794, after a short illness, and was buried on the 23rd on the east side of the Friends' burying ground at Wooleyburnfoot.5

Rachel Wigham was the youngest child of [M18] William and [M31] Rachel Wigham .6

 

1 TNA: RG 6/312, /1271

2 TNA: RG 6/334, /355

3 Dictionary of Quaker Biography (Friends' House Library, typescript)

4 George Richardson (1848) Some Account of the Rise of the Society of Friends in Cornwood in Northumberland, especially in connexion with the family of Cuthbert Wigham. London: Charles Gilpin, pp. 36-7

5 RG 6/312

6 Richardson (1848), op. cit.


M18. WILLIAM WIGHAM

William Wigham was baptised at Haltwhistle, Northumberland on 30 August 1723. He married [M31] Rachel Teasdale on the 20th February 1746. They had seven children: Hannah (1747–1807), [P3] John (1749–1839), James (1751–1824), Thomas (1753–1812), William (1756–1826), Cuthbert (1759–1828), and [M17] Rachel (1763–1794), all of whose births were registered by Cumberland & Northumberland Quarterly Meeting.1

Described by his son as "a very industrious man", he was not sufficiently aware of the danger to which his son was exposed when he put him to work with the servants.2

In 1776 he was executor of the will of his father-in-law John Teasdale, also inheriting from him his whole estate of land and houses at Bails, the house occupied by James Teasdale, and the residue of his estate.3

Burnhouse, Hargill House, and Coldshield—the main Wigham farming properties—had all been bequeathed to him, but he predeceased his father, dying at home at Hargill House, Coanwood, on the 16th April 1777; he was buried on the 20th.4

William Wigham was the eldest child of [M19] Cuthbert and [M28] Elizabeth Wigham.5


1 "England Births and Christenings, 1538–1975," database, FamilySearch: 6 December 2014), William Wigham, 30 Aug 1723; citing HALTWHISTLE, NORTHUMBERLAND, reference FHL microfilm 0252510, 0252513, 0252510-0252513;  George Richardson: Some Account of the Rise of the Society of Friends in Cornwood in Northumberland, especially in connexion with the family of Cuthbert Wigham. London: Charles Gilpin 1848

2 John Wigham (1842) Memoirs of the Life, Gospel Labours and Religious Experience of John Wigham. London: Harvey and Darton; p. 3,

3 Durham Probate Records, DPRI/1/1776/T3

4 TNA: RG 6/312; L.C. Coombes: 'Wigham of Coanwood.' Overprint from Archaeologia Aeliana, 4th ser. vol. xliv, 1966; DQB

5 Coombes (1966)


M19. CUTHBERT WIGHAM

Cuthbert Wigham was born about 1704. He was still a minor when his father died. Though educated in profession with the Church of England, he appears to have known little of the influence of religion; but took pleasure in loose and unprofitable company, delighting in vain sports, &c.1

He married [M28] Elizabeth Dixon on the 19th October 1722, by licence, at Hexham parish church. They had seven children: [M18] William (1723–1777), Mary (1726 – ?), Thomas (1727/8–1785), Mabel (1730–1781), Hannah (1732–1732), John (1733–1787), and James (1739 – ?); John's birth was recorded by Yorkshire QM, James's by Cumberland & Northumberland QM; all except James were baptised at Haltwhistle.2

There is every likelihood that the Wighams made full use of their position as landowners, although there is only one record of a lease and that in 1727 when Cuthbert granted a lease for 21 years for coal mining to Richard Harrison and Charles Errington of Corbyates in Alston Moor for £14 per annum and one third of the profits. . . . That Cuthbert Wigham did engage in mining on his own account is revealed in a brief note which states "the shaft ye had ye Dick [dyke] in it cost me with cutting the dike and sinking ye shaft £2 12s. 4d. Drowned out in this pitt." Probably this was for local use and the lease of mines to a large consumer such as the London Lead Co. would be much more profitable. All these facts suggest, for the most part indirectly, that coal mining played some part in the Wigham fortunes, but a closer connection cannot be shown and it would be unwise to draw definite conclusions.3

He was convinced about 1734, as a result of experiencing temporary blindness as he returned from a card party. A visit to the area by Benjamin Holmes was probably also instrumental in his convincement. It is related of him, that about 1734, one day as he was walking, having continued his habit of wearing a sword, it accidentally caught his heel; whereupon he hastily uttered one of those profane expressions, which had been his familiar practice; but for which he felt deep compunction; especially on overhearing one of his servants, who was near, exultingly exclaim, "Our master is no Quaker yet." In 1735 he obtained a licence from the Quarter Sessions and settled a meeting in his own home, Bournhouse, Coanwood, Northumberland. About a year after his convincement he became a minister. "His ministry was not with enticing words of Man's Wisdom, but in the power, and demonstration of the spirit, often had to magnify that power that had redeemed his Soul out of the horrible pit . . . ." In 1739 he and his wife built a farmhouse at Coldshield; their inscription is on the lintel above the back door. He has a freehold at Burnhouse, Conwood, in 1747A tannery was operating in the Tanpits Ravine from before 1750 to about 1780, owned by the Wigham family from Burn House. In 1753, with John Pattinson, he journeyed on foot to several towns and villages where there were no Friends, and held meetings there. He also visited meetings in Cumberland, Durham, parts of Yorkshire, Westmorland, and Scotland on various occasions, and attended Yearly Meeting at Edinburgh. He was especially helpful to young convinced Friends.4

He was a man of considerable influence, as he owned a large estate, with manorial privileges over 2000 acres. He was frequently referred to as 'Lord Wigham'. He put forward some of his sons in business, but they proved unworthy of his confidence, wasting much of his property, and caused him much grief. Others of them, however, were of a different disposition.5

In his zealous desire that his household should be an example of that simplicity of apparel which Quakerism enjoined, he spoke to one of his servants of the vanity of indulging in the use of gaudy attire, in ribbons, &c. She quickly turned upon him, by proposing that he should relinquish the unnecessary use of tobacco, and she the practice of wearing ribbons; to which, with true self-denial, he consented.6

For reasons unknown, in the summer of 1758 he sold his lordship of the manor of East Coanwood, to one William Ord. In a letter dated 11th August 1758 Cuthbert Wigham wrote to William Gibson, his lawyer, asking him to see that "all things were done justly" when he sold "the tenants and royalets and his share of part of the common", stipulating that (1) William Ord was to have no land or common but what fell to his share for being lord of the manor, (2) that Ord pay compensation upon all lands when mining took place, two men "to set ye damage" as had been the custom, and (3) a parcel of land called Hargill Rigg, part of which was pasture when purchased but now enclosed about 40 years, should remain out of purchase, being his son William's freehold. This is now the site of Hargill House, which is still occupied by a Wigham today, in direct descent. The sale of the manorial rights of Coanwood occurred exactly a century after their purchase by Cuthbert Wigham's grandfather, but with the farms of Burnhouse, Coldshield, the Mill, Woodhouse and Hargill House in the possession of the family they were still substantial farmers. The loss of manorial rights meant also the loss of mineral rights and this loss may have been financially considerable.7

In 1760 he gave a piece of ground 30 yards square, on which to build a meeting house, and form a burial ground, and generously contributed towards the building, which cost £104.8

He appears to have been as a burning and shining light; and it is probable that his savoury example, in life and conversation, as well as his ministerial and other labours, were blessed to many. It appears that he sometimes found it his duty to convey to his neighbours his religious concern for their welfare in writing. On one of these occasions, he attempted to reason with himself against it; considering that he frequently saw the individual in question; and that he had opportunities to express his feeling toward him personally. But, keeping under his mental exercise, he at length wrote a letter, which, happening to fall into the hands of the wife of the individual to whom it was addressed, she had the curiosity to open it: the consequence was, that she became convinced of the rectitude of those religious principles, which, in the time of her ignorance, she had despised and condemned.9

On a lighter note, the following anecdote is told of him: When that courteous, kindly, but bashful gentleman, William Beaumont, shook hands with Cuthbert Wigham at Quarterly Meeting, he said, hospitably,—"Cuthbert, wilt thou come up at three o'clock and pick a bone with me?" "Na, na, Willum," was the reply, "if I wait till three o'clock I mun hae something better than a bone to pick."10

Though, through age and bodily infirmities, his natural faculties became much impaired, yet his mind appeared to be redeemed out of all evil, having the hope set before him in the gospel, as an anchor to his soul; being brought to the innocency of a little child. And, though perfectly sensible of his approaching dissolution, he was enabled to look forward to it with cheerfulness: "I will wait in patience till my change come; oh, it is a fine thing to be ready." Indeed the patience and resignation which appeared depicted in his countenance, evidently denoted the calmness and serenity of his mind. He died on the 9th February 1780, and was buried on the 12th in the Friends' burial ground, Coanwood.11

Cuthbert Wigham was the eldest child of [M20] William and [M25] Mabel Wigham .12

 

1 George Richardson: Some Account of the Rise of the Society of Friends in Cornwood in Northumberland, especially in connexion with the family of Cuthbert Wigham. London: Charles Gilpin 1848: 1; L.C. Coombes: 'Wigham of Coanwood.' Overprint from Archaeologia Aeliana, 4th ser. vol. xliv, 1966; Piety Promoted

2 Coombes (1966); FamilySearch

3 Coombes (1966)

4 Richardson (1848): 2; Piety Promoted; Coanwood.com, accessed 2009-10-31; poll book

5 Richardson (1848): 3-4; Coombes (1966); Richardson (1848) gives acreage as over 2800

6 Richardson (1848): 3-4

7 Coombes (1966); Richardson (1848); TNA: RG 6/1271 [1759 of Bournhouse, Coanwood]

8 Coombes (1966)

9 Richardson (1848): 8 & 40

10 Robert Spence Watson in John William Steel: A Historical Sketch of the Society of Friends 'in Scorn called Quakers' in Newcastle & Gateshead 1653–1898. London & Newcastle, Headley Bros. 1899: 131

11 Richardson (1848):44; Piety Promoted

12 Coombes (1966)


M20. WILLIAM WIGHAM

In 1694 William Wigham served his apprenticeship at Chapell with Matthew Baxter as a skinner and glover.1

He married [M25] Mabel Hutchinson. Their children were: [M19] Cuthbert (1704–1780), Esther (1706 – before 1764), Rebecca (before 1708 – after 1716), Hannah (1712 – after 1716), and William (1715–1720).2

He was lord of the manor of East Coanwood. In 1700 the tenement of Townhead was surrendered to him by his brother Cuthbert. In 1699 his brother surrendered the tenement of Townfoot, Gorbut Hill, to William's use. Townfoot could be Tanpits as we know it now, and this could have been the start of the local Wigham's tannery, as William would now have been a qualified skinner and glover. He made his will in 1708/9 and 1715.3

 

In the naime of god amen the first day of January of ye year of our Lord god Lord 1708 I william Wigham of burn house yeoman being very sick and weak in body body but of perfect mind and memory thanks be to god theirfore Calling unto mind the mortality of my body and knowing that it is apointed for all men once to die die [sic] I do make this my Last will and testament that is to say principally and first of all I give and recommend my soull unto the hands of god that gave it and for my body I recommend it to the earth to be buryed in a Christian life and decent maner at ye discretion of my executors nothing doupting but at the generall Resurrection I shall Receive the same againe by the mighty power of god and ass touching such worldly Estate wherewith it hath plesed god to bless me In this life I give devise and dispose of ye same in the following maner and form ——

Imprimiss I give and bequeath to ester my well beloved daughter the summ of therty pounds of good and lawfull money Item more I give to my well beloved daughter Rebecca the summ of therty pounds of good and lawfull money to be payd by the heir Cuthbert Wigham when they come to perfect age ——

Item I give to my well beloved wife mabell whom I likewise Constitute make and ordain my onely and sole executor of this my last will and testament all and singular my goods and Chattells whatsoever and she is to take Caire and bring up my Children untill they Come at perfect age and if she mary the heir my son Cuthbert Wigham is to pay her for her Joyntter six pounds yearly for her life and I doe hereby utterly [disavow?] revoke and disanull all and every other former testaments wills and Legacies Requests and executors by me in any wise ways before this time naimed and no other to be my last will and testament In witnes whereof I have here unto set my hand day and year above writtensignature of William Wigham

[signed William Wigham, witnesses William Reay and Matthew Wigham]            

[continues overleaf, apparently as 1715 codicil:]

furder more att my death I Leave unto my well beloved son william four score pounds Likewise I leave unto my well beloved daughter Hanah therty pounds of good and Lawfull meney to be payd by the heir Cuthbert Wigham when they come to perfect age further more I leave unto my Brother Matthew wigham all my Cloathes Likwise I Leave unto my sester Ann Wigham twenty and eighteen pence Likewise I Leave unto my sister Alice Hucthinson one pound one shilling and sixpence which my Executor is for to pay this addition being the just and true meaning of this my will and testament

[not signed further, but witnessed by William Colson, Matt Wigham, and John Pattison]4

He died in 1715, and was buried at Haltwhistle on the 6th September. The inventory of his property, taken on 21 September by Robert Hutchinson, John Pattison, Myles Birkett and Matt: Wigham,  showed him to have been in possession of 11 kine, 2 calves, 1 bull, 2 heifers, 2 pigs, 4 steers, 112 sheep, and 2 horses (a mare and a gelding), as well as poultry; he had nearly four times as many sheep as his predecessors. His crop of hay and corn was valued at £40. Individual legacies totalled £170. The total value of the inventory was £144.18.6d (£12,282 at 2005 values). It appears that William had seen years of increasing though modest wealth.5

William Wigham was the second son of [M21] Mathew and [M24] ____ Wigham.6

 

1 Coanwood.com

2 L.C. Coombes: 'Wigham of Coanwood.' Overprint from Archaeologia Aeliana, 4th ser. vol. xliv, 1966; FamilySearch; will

3 Coombes (1966); Coanwood.com, accessed 2009-10-31; described as "the Lord of Coinwood" at his daughter's burial in 1720 (Northumberland and Durham burials)

4 Durham Probate records, DPRI/1/1716/W14

5 Coombes (1966); Durham Probate records, DPRI/1/1716/W14

6 Coombes (1966)


M21. MATTHEW WIGHAM

Matthew Wigham was in 1673 High Constable of the West Division of Tindale Ward. One of the duties which fell to him was the collection of the proportion of his division of a tax of over £1,000,000 authorised by Parliament, in six quarterly payments, payable to Mr Patrick Crow of Ashington. A surviving court roll of 1676 describes Mathew Wigham as Lord of East Coanwood. He sold Nine Dargs in 1684.1

Matthew Wigham married [M24] ____ ____. Their children were: [M20] William (? – 1715), Matthew (? – after 1715), Cuthbert (? – ?), Anne (? – after 1715), Alice (? – after 1715), Thomas (? – ?), Mary (? – ?), and Jane (? – ?).2

On 1 May 1700 Thomas Wallis, Lord of the Manor of West Coanwood, and Matthew Wigham, Lord of the Manor of East Coanwood, together with their 20 customary tenants, rode the boundary between Chriswell Bourne and Old Lough Foote, Whitfield. The boundary was agreed and signed by all.3

He made his will on 6th May 1702:

 

In the name of God amen the sixth day of may 1702 According to the computation of the Church of England I Matthew Wigham of burnhouse in the county of Nothrumberland and paresh of Haltwisell yeaman Being of perfect memory and Remembrance praised Be god do make and ordaine this my Last will And testament In manner and form following

ffirst I bequeath my my [sic] soul Into the hands of Almighty god my maker hoping that through the meritorious death and passion of Jesus Christ my only Saviour and Redeemer to Receive free pardon and forgivenesse of all my sins and as for my body to be buried In Christian burial att the discretion of my Executrize hereafter nominated

Item I give unto my second son Matthew Wigham twenty pounds and the gray gelend [gelding] Item I give unto my son Thomas Wigham three skore pounds, Item I give unto my daughter Mary Wigham Therty pounds Item I give unto my dauthter Jane Reay five pounds Item all the Rest I give unto my sonn William Wigham houses Lands and Leasese goods And cattells whatsoever to Receive and to pay All my debts and Ligessies and do Leave him my soole Executer of this my Last will Revooicking All wills and other testaments.

And thereto I put my hand seall abovewritten.

Signed sealed & delivered in the presence of

signature of Matthew Wigham

 

John Wigham

John Pattison

Thomas wigham

Matthew wigham4

He was buried at Haltwhistle on the 8th May 1702; the burial register describes him as "Lord Wigham of Cornwood Roe". His will was proved at Durham. The inventory of his farm stock, taken a week later, showed him to have possessed 9 kine, 5 calves, 1 bull, 4 heifers, 1 pig, 6 steers, 16 ewes and lambs, 15 hogs, and 1 Galaway horse, poultry and household goods, of a total value of £50-8-6; there is no information on crops.5

Matthew Wigham was the son of [M22] Cuthbert and [M23] ____ Wigham.6

 

1–2 L.C. Coombes: 'Wigham of Coanwood.' Overprint from Archaeologia Aeliana, 4th ser. vol. xliv, 1966; Durham Probate records, DPRI/1/1716/W14

3 Coanwood.com, accessed 2009-10-31

4 Durham Probate records, DPRI/1/1716/W13

5 Durham Probate records, DPRI/1/1716/W13; L.C. Coombes: 'Wigham of Coanwood.' Overprint from Archaeologia Aeliana, 4th ser. vol. xliv, 1966

6 L.C. Coombes: 'Wigham of Coanwood.' Overprint from Archaeologia Aeliana, 4th ser. vol. xliv, 1966

 


M22. CUTHBERT WIGHAM

Cuthbert Wigham married [M23] ____ ____. Their children were [M21] Mathew (? – 1702) and Alice (? – after 1673).1

In 1634 he was a weaver of Nine Dargs, Allendale. He purchased Burnhouse in Coanwood in 1640, from Christopher Hornesby, for £100, with customary rent of 13/4 payable to Albany Featherstonhaugh as lord of the manor of East and West Coanwood.2

On the 13th December 1658 Nicholas Byerly gave bond of £424 to Cuthbert Wigham that he would keep the conditions of an indenture of bargain and sale, made between Nicholas Byerly, Albany Featherstonhaugh, and Thomas Selby, on the one part and Cuthbert Wigham & John Ridley of Hardriding on the other. There is no indication of the nature of this sale but a document dated 20th April 1659 is a declaration that the sale of the manors East and West Coanwood, with 14 tenements of 500 acres, comprising 100 acres of arable, 100 acres of meadow and 300 acres of furze, heath and common pasture, by Albany Featherstonhaugh, Nicholas Byerly and Thomas Selby to Cuthbert Wigham for £300 had been recorded by the Court of Common Bench at Westminster. Probably only East Coanwood was actually involved.3

He made his will in 1673, the year he died:

 

Memorandum aboute ye i6th of May Anno Dom~ 1673 Cuthbert Wigham of Burne house— being sick of body but of good and p~fect remembrance did make and ordaine his Last Will and Testament by word of mouth —Noncupatively in manner and forme following; (vizt) I give unto my wife six pounds yearly during her life naturall if she cannot other waies agree wth my son Mathew Wigham, and I give unto my [sonse?] son three hogs, and I give unto my daughter Alice ffoure oxen and one Quie & thirty five shillings wch she is oweing me, & fforty shillings in Mr: John Blenkinsops hands and I give all my Lambes to be equally divided between my daughters Children & my mide maide Barbarie Hutchinson, and I give Henry Sheild & Hugh Sheild ten shillings betweixt them, all my other goods moveable & unmoveable I give to my sonne Mathew Wigham wth all my stocke of [illeg. word] whome I make my sole exectores, and to pay all my debts and ffunerall Charges; all wch words or words to ye like effect were spoken in ye heareing of Henry Sheild, Willm Carrack, John Wigham jurat & Barbary Hutchison

[only witness to sign: John Wigham]

The inventory, made on 26 May 1673, shows farm stock of 10 kine, 1 bull, 9 quies, 5 stotts, 28 sheep, and 2 horses; there is no information on crops. The total value of the inventory was £60 3s. 8d. (£4998 at 2005 values), (which included £21 3s. 4d. in cash owing to him from fourteen named individuals).4

 

1–4 L.C. Coombes: 'Wigham of Coanwood.' Overprint from Archaeologia Aeliana, 4th ser. vol. xliv, 1966; Durham Probate Records, DPRI/1/1673/W19


M23. ____ WIGHAM born _____

____ ____ married [M22] Cuthbert Wigham. Their children were [M21] Mathew (? – 1702) and Alice (? – ?).1

She was alive in 1673, when she was named in her husband's will.2


1–2 L.C. Coombes: 'Wigham of Coanwood.' Overprint from Archaeologia Aeliana, 4th ser. vol. xliv, 1966


M24. ____ WIGHAM born ____

____ ____ married [M21] Mathew Wigham. Their children were: [M20] William (? – 1715), Matthew (? – after 1715), Cuthbert (? – ?),Anne (? – ?), Alice (? – ?), Thomas (? – ?), Mary (? – ?), and Jane (? – ?).1


1 L.C. Coombes: 'Wigham of Coanwood.' Overprint from Archaeologia Aeliana, 4th ser. vol. xliv, 1966


M25. MABEL WIGHAM born HUTCHINSON

Mabel Hutchinson married [M20] William Wigham. Their children were: [M19] Cuthbert (1704–1780), Esther (1706 – before 1764), Rebecca (before 1708 – after 1716), Hannah (1712 – after 1716), and William (1715–1720).1

She was executor of her husband's will in 1715, and made her own will on the 22nd May 1716:2

 

In the name of god amen the twenty second day of may in the yeare of our Lord god one thousand seven hundd and sixtene I mabell wigham of burnhouse Relict of william wigham deceased being very week in body but of perfect mind and memory thanks be unto god calling to mind the mortalyty of my body and knowing that it is Appoanted for all men and women once to die do so make and ordaine this my Last will and testatment that is to say prentipellly and first of all I give and Recommend my soull unto the hands of god that gave it me and for my body I Recommend it to the Earth to be buryed in a Christian Like and decent maner att the descretion of my Executer nothing doubting but att the generall Resurrection I shall Receive the same againe by the mighty power of god and as tuching such worldly goods where with it hath pleased god to bless me in this Life I give devise and dispose of the same in following manner and form I give and bequath unto my son william four pounds Likewise I bequath unto my daughter Esther two pounds Likewise I bequath unto my daughter Rebeccah two pounds Likewise I bequath unto my daughter Hanah two pounds and all the Rest of my good I Leave unto my Son Cuthbart wigham moveable and unmoveable and do so make him my sooll Executor of all my goods and Chattell in case he pay of all my debts and Legessses and bury my body in Christian buryall and further my extr is to bring up my children till perfet age and do so make this my Last will and testament Revoaking all other wills and testaments my just meaning for my Executor to pay Each of them when they com to perfect age further more I leave and desire Robert Hutchinson and Matthew Wigham to give there assestence to help to Right and assest and so that may Children soffer no wrong as witnesses my hand

[Witnesses: John Pattison, Matthew Hutchinson, Henry Wigham, George Pearson]

She died at Burnhouse, Coanwood, and was buried at Haltwhistle on the 3rd June 1716. Her will was proved at Durham. Her inventory, taken on 9 July, includes bedding and three bedsteads valued at £3, followed by the pewter and brass at £2 10s. 0d. Two other bedsteads existed, but apparently without bedding. Other items included sheets and table linen, two iron pots and a yeatling, a wooden vessel, two spinning wheels and a stock of wool, eight chairs, two tables and frames, a cupboard, a dresser table and a presser. Livestock included ten cows, a bull, two oxen, two little steers, 4 calves, 80 sheep, and 31 lambs. The total valuation came to £72 11s, but after deduction of monies owing to four individuals, and funeral expenses of £1 14s. 3d, the net balance was £19 3s 6d (£1625 at 2005 values).3

Mabel Hutchinson was the daughter of [M26] ____ and [M27] ____ Hutchinson.4


1 L.C. Coombes: 'Wigham of Coanwood.' Overprint from Archaeologia Aeliana, 4th ser. vol. xliv, 1966; FamilySearch; husband's will

2 Coombes (1966); Durham Probate Records, DPRI/1/1716/W13; DPRI/1/1716/W14

3 Coombes (1966); Durham Probate Records, DPRI/1/1716/W13

4 Coombes (1966)

 


M26. ____ HUTCHINSON

____ Hutchinson married [M27] ____ ____. Their children were [M25] Mabel (? – 1716), and Mathew (? – ?).1

 

1 L.C. Coombes: 'Wigham of Coanwood.' Overprint from Archaeologia Aeliana, 4th ser. vol. xliv, 1966


M27. ____ HUTCHINSON, born ____

____ ____ married [M26] ____ Hutchinson. Their children were [M25] Mabel (? – 1716), and Mathew (? – ?).1

 

 

1 L.C. Coombes: 'Wigham of Coanwood.' Overprint from Archaeologia Aeliana, 4th ser. vol. xliv, 1966


M28. ELIZABETH WIGHAM born DIXON

Elizabeth Dixon was baptised on the 8th November 1699, at Knaresdale, Northumberland.1

She married [M19] Cuthbert Wigham, by licence, on the 19th October 1722, at Hexham parish church. They had seven children: [M18] William (1723–1777), Mary (1726 – ?), Thomas (1727/8–1785), Mabel (1730–1781), Hannah (1732–1732), John (1733–1787), and James (1739 – ?); John's birth was recorded by Yorkshire QM, James's by Cumberland & Northumberland QM; all except James were baptised at Haltwhistle.2

She died on the 29th July 1759, and was buried on the 2nd August in Burnhouse graveyard.3

Elizabeth Dixon was the daughter of [M29] Thomas and [M30] Elinor Dixon.4


1 "England Births and Christenings, 1538–1975," database, FamilySearch: 30 December 2014, Elizabeth Dixon, 08 Nov 1699; citing KNARSDALE, NORTHUMBERLAND, index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City, FHL microfilm 95,001; L.C. Coombes: 'Wigham of Coanwood.' Overprint from Archaeologia Aeliana, 4th ser. vol. xliv, 1966

2 Coombes (1966); FamilySearch; TNA: RG 6/1271; William Evans and Thomas Evans, eds (1854) Piety Promoted, in a collection of dying sayings of many of the people called Quakers . . . . Philadelphia

3 Coombes (1966); TNA: RG 6/1271

4 Coombes (1966)

 


M29. THOMAS DIXON

Thomas Dixon of Far House, Knarsdale, married [M30] Elinor ____ and was alive in 1699.1


1 John Hall Shield: Genealogical Notes on the Families of Hall, Featherston, Wigham, Ostle, Watson &c.; L.C. Coombes: 'Wigham of Coanwood.' Overprint from Archaeologia Aeliana, 4th ser. vol. xliv, 1966


M30. ELINOR DIXON born ____

Elinor ____ of Far House, Knarsdale, married [M29] Thomas Dixon, and was alive in 1699.1


1 John Hall Shield: Genealogical Notes on the Families of Hall, Featherston, Wigham, Ostle, Watson &c.; L.C. Coombes: 'Wigham of Coanwood.' Overprint from Archaeologia Aeliana, 4th ser. vol. xliv, 1966


M31. RACHEL WIGHAM born TEASDALE

Rachel Teasdale was born around 1722 in Alston in Cumberland.1

She was drawn to a religious life when very young and by the grace of God was protected as she grew up from the snares and temptations of the world.2

She married [M18] William Wigham on the 20th February 1746. They had seven children: Hannah (1747–1807), [P3] John (1749–1839), James (1751–1824), Thomas (1753–1812), William (1756–1826), Cuthbert (1759–1828), and [M17] Rachel (1763–1794), all of whose births were registered by Cumberland & Northumberland Quarterly Meeting. In the training up of her children, she was very vigilant; her mind being attentive to the voice of pure wisdom, she was enabled to guide her household with admirable discretion.3

Soon after her marriage she appeared in the ministry and became an able minister, in which capacity she continued about 65 years. Her service was very great in the monthly meeting to which she belonged; and she was several times drawn forth in Gospel love, to visit the meetings of Friends in divers counties of England and Wales, and also in Scotland and Ireland, in all which services it was believed her labours of love tended to the edification of Friends, and her own peace. She was a sharp reprover of such as took undue liberties, but cherished every appearance of good with the utmost candour. She was an affectionate wife, a tender and circumspect mother, a sincere friend and good neighbour; sympathizing with the afflicted and charitable to the poor, of every denomination; she also cherished the most tender regard for the animal creation.4

After her husband's death in 1777 she continued to live at Hargillhouse, Haltwhistle, Northumberland, at least until 1782, in which year she witnessed her daughter's wedding at Conwood. Some time thereafter she moved to Allendale, to live with Joseph and Rachel Watson; she spent the rest of her days there. After Rachel's early death, in 1794, she became the active counsellor, and care-taker, over her late daughter's rising offspring, greatly to their benefit. She was very useful in her new meeting, and often appeared in lively testimony.5

Apparently she was notable for smoking a pipe.6

In her old age she became weak, and lost her sight; she was confined to the house nearly six years, and for a considerable time to her bed. She bore these infirmities patiently, and meetings often took place in her room.7

Around September 1808 she was visited at Allendale by her son John, who described her as "confined to bed a considerable time, in great bodily affliction, and quite blind,—but sweetly alive in spirit." In April 1810 she was visited by William Forster, who found her "now in an enfeebled state."8

For about three years before her decease, her intellectual faculties were much impaired, and she was reduced to a very helpless state, having only short intervals of perfect consciousness, but without appearing to have much pain. Of Riding in Allendale, she died there quietly on the 6th April 1813. Her body was buried on the 9th, at Wooleyburnfoot in Allendale.9

The 1815 Annual Monitor records the following10:

 

RACHEL WIGHAM, of Allendale, a minister about 66 years. ......         91              6  4 Mo. 1813.

On some particular occasion, this venerable pilgrim had to observe: "I have passed through a long scene of affliction; yet I well know that the Lord is able to sanctify every affliction; and, blessed be his holy name! he hath done it; and at times given me a foretaste of the joys that are eternal."

How animating is the view of one who has endured so long a season of probation, extended nearly to one hundred years; and who was able to bear such a testimony to the goodness and all-sufficiency of the Divine Power"

Rachel Teasdale was the daughter of [M32] John and [M33] Jennet Teasdale.11

 


1 TNA: RG 6/385, /465

2 Dictionary of Quaker Biography (Friends' House Library, typescript)

3 TNA: RG 6/1271; Annual Monitor; William Evans and Thomas Evans, eds (1854) Piety Promoted, in a collection of dying sayings of many of the people called Quakers . . . . Philadelphia; George Richardson: Some Account of the Rise of the Society of Friends in Cornwood in Northumberland, especially in connexion with the family of Cuthbert Wigham. London: Charles Gilpin 1848

4 Richardson (1848)

5 RG 6/355; DQB; Richardson (1848); David Sands: Journal of the Life and Gospel Labours. London: Charles Gilpin, 1848

6 Friends' Quarterly Examiner 28:194

7 Richardson (1848); DQB

8 John Wigham (1842) Memoirs of the Life, Gospel Labours and Religious Experience of John Wigham. London: Harvey and Darton, p. 96; Earlham College download

9 Richardson (1848); RG 6/385, /465

10 Annual Monitor 1815

11 John Hall Shield: Genealogical Notes on the Families of Hall, Featherston, Wigham, Ostle, Watson &c.

 


M32. JOHN TEASDALL or TEASDALE

John Teasdale married [M37] Jennet Reay on the 28th December 1718, at Limestonebree. Their only known child was [M31] Rachel (cal 1722 – 1813).1

In 1722 he lived in Alston, Cumberland.2

Some of his advice on religious matters and right living is reported by his daughter Rachel, in Richardson's Rise of the Society of Friends in Cornwood.3

He made his will on the 3rd July 17614:

I John Teasdale of Aldstone in the county of Cumberland being under much Indisposition of Body But in perfect mind & memory Do herby make and Ordain my last Will & Testament, Disposing of my temporal Goods in manner following, first I give unto my loving Wife my House in which we live together with all the Household furniture there unto belonging and also the stables & cowhouse underneath the said House, both that let to Farm to James Teasdale as that occupied by my self all which I give & Bequeath to her During her life natural, I also give unto her my said Wife the sum of twelve pounds to be paid her yearly at two equal payments by my Executor hereafter named for her support yearly and every year so long as she shall live. 2dly I make & Institute my son in Law William Wigham my sole Executor to whom I give and Bequeath my whole Estate of Land & Houses at Bails During my Daughter Rachel's life & after her Decease may Dispose of them as he & She shall think proper in her life amongst her Children, also I give to my aforenamed Executor the House that James Teasdale now lives in Ordering that he pay at Isabel Whitfield's Decease the sum of thirty five pounds which is due upon a Bond to Joseph Whitfield, all the Residue & remainder of my goods & Chattles moveable & Immoveable. I likewise give to my Executor ordering that he pay all my Debts & funeral Expences Revoking all other Wills & Testaments by me made I declare this to be my last Will & Testament as Witness my hand and seal this third day of July in the year of our Lord One thousand seven hundred & sixty one.

Signd, sealed & Declared by the above named John Teasdale to be his last Will & testament in the presence of us—

Giles Raisley

Thomas Friend

 

He endured much pain in the last three weeks of his life.5

His will was proved at Durham in 1776.6

 

1 John Hall Shield: Genealogical Notes on the Families of Hall, Featherston, Wigham, Ostle, Watson &c.; TNA: RG 6/1271; George Richardson (1848) Some Account of the Rise of the Society of Friends in Cornwood in Northumberland, especially in connexion with the family of Cuthbert Wigham. London: Charles Gilpin

2 TNA: RG 6/1271

3 Richardson (1848)

4 Durham Probate Records, DPRI/1/1776/T3

5 Richardson (1848)

6 Durham Probate Records, DPRI/1/1776/T3

 


M37. JENNET TEASDALE born REA(Y)

Jennet Rea was baptised at St Nicholas, Whitehaven, Cumberland, on 24 July 1698.1

Jennet Reay married [M32] John Teasdale on the 28th December 1718, at Limestonebree. Their only known child was [M31] Rachel (cal 1722 – 1813).2

In 1722 she lived in Alston, Cumberland.3

Some of her religious advice and sayings to her children are recorded in Richardson's work, cited above.4

She survived her husband about a year, dying, after five days' illness, of a disorder sharp in its attack, and which, with the effects of old age, impaired her memory.5

Jennet Rea was the only known child of [M38] John Rea.6


1 "England Births and Christenings, 1538–1975," database, FamilySearch: 30 December 2014, Jennett Rea, 24 Jul 1698, citing ST NICHOLAS, WHITEHAVEN, CUMBERLAND, reference FHL microfilm 90,658

2 John Hall Shield: Genealogical Notes on the Families of Hall, Featherston, Wigham, Ostle, Watson &c.; TNA: RG 6/1271; George Richardson (1848) Some Account of the Rise of the Society of Friends in Cornwood in Northumberland, especially in connexion with the family of Cuthbert Wigham. London: Charles Gilpin; Durham Probate Records, DPRI/1/1747/T2; International Genealogical Index, 1988 edn has the baptism of Jennett Rea, daughter of John Rea, on the 24th July 1698, at St Nicholas, Whitehaven.

3 TNA: RG 6/1271

4–5 Richardson (1848)

6 FamilySearch


M38. JOHN REA

John Rea was alive in 1698.1

 

1 "England Births and Christenings, 1538–1975," database, FamilySearch: 30 December 2014, Jennett Rea, 24 Jul 1698; citing ST NICHOLAS, WHITEHAVEN, CUMBERLAND, reference FHL microfilm 90,658


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