The Sutton family of Scotby and Newcastle

 

David Sutton = Rebecca Moor

     |         other children

Deborah Sutton = Isaac Richardson

      |         other children

Edward Richardson = Jane Wigham

      |         other children

Elizabeth Richardson = Robert Spence Watson

      |         other children

Mary Spence Watson = Francis Edward Pollard

 

O19. DEBORAH RICHARDSON born SUTTON

silhouette of Deborah (Sutton) RichardsonDeborah Sutton was born at Newcastle on the 2nd June 1773. In 1786 she began her attendance at the Trinity Lane Friends’ School in York.1

She was a witness at her father’s second wedding ceremony, on 26 September 1792 at Newcastle meeting house.1A

signature of Deborah SuttonShe married [O3] Isaac Richardson on the 20th August 1795, also at Newcastle meeting house. Their children were: David (1797–1809), John (1799–1859), Isaac (1800–1810), Margaret (1802–1810), Rebecca (1804–1805), [O2] Edward (1806–1863), Rebecca (1807–1834), and Ann (1809–1893).2

In 1802 she twice served as representative to Women’s Monthly Meeting. She was one of the two Newcastle representatives in November 1806, in March and July 1807, in March and November 1808 (on the latter occasion with Esther Watson), in April, June and November 1809 (again with Esther Watson that month), in January and December 1811 (with Esther Watson in January), in June and December 1812, and June 1814.2A

From at least 1809 she lived at Spring Gardens, near Gallowgate, Newcastle. From 1810, during the minority of her sons John and Edward, she was paid £100 p.a. in quarterly instalments, and the interest of £2000, by the trustees of her husband’s estate. In April 1829 she inherited £700 from her father. In the 1830s she was living there with her daughter Ann (later Foster). In 1832 she witnessed the birth of her granddaughter Anna Deborah Richardson.3

In 1841 she removed to 3 Summerhill Grove, Westgate, Newcastle, to be near her two sons, John and Edward, who had settled there. Of independent means, she was recorded there in the 1841 census, with her daughter and two servants.4

One of her grandchildren remembered that "in those non-teetotal days, the good old lady was very proud of her gooseberry wine."5

She made her will on 28 April 1846:

 

This is the last Will and Testament of me Deborah Richardson of Summerhill Grove Newcastle upon Tyne, Widow, made and published this Twenty eighth day of April One thousand eight hundred and forty six, I give devise and bequeath all and every the estates which are or may be vested in me at the time of my decease on any trusts or by way of Mortgage and which I have power to dispose of by this my Will with their appurtenances unto my dear sons John Richardson and Edward Richardson both of Newcastle aforesaid their heirs executors administrators and assigns according to the nature and quality thereof respectively upon trust to hold or dispose of the said trust estates in the manner in which they ought to be held or disposed of pursuant to the said trusts and upon payment of the money secured on Mortgage to convey or assign the estates in mortgage to the person or persons entitled thereto for the time being, and I declare that the money secured upon such mortgages shall be considered and taken to be part of my estate herein after bequeathed. I give and bequeath all and singular my estate and effects wheresoever and of what denomination and kind soever (subject only to the payment of my just debts funeral and testamentary expences and the charges of proving this my Will) unto my dear children John Richardson Edward Richardson and Ann Richardson absolutely in equal shares and proportions as tenants in common and I appoint my said dear sons John Richardson and Edward Richardson joint Executors of this my Will and I declare that they shall not be answerable the one for the other of them but for their own respective acts deeds and defaults only. And hereby revoking all former Wills by me made I declare this to be my last Will and Testament. In witness whereof I the said Deborah Richardson have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first before written.

signature of Deborah Richardson

[Witnesses: Joseph Richardson, William Wrightson]

She died at Summerhill Grove on 20 June 1848, of decay of nature. She was buried in plot 5 of the Pilgrim Street meeting house graveyard, on the 25th June. Her will was proved at Durham on 12 December 1848, her estate valued at under £5000 (£292,650 at 2005 values).6

Deborah Sutton was the youngest child of [O20] David and [O39] Rebecca Sutton.7

 

1 George Richardson (1850) The Annals of the Cleveland Richardsons, Newcastle; TNA: PRO RG 6/226, /1260; The Mount School, York. List of Teachers and Scholars 1784–1816, 1831–1906. 1906, York: Sessions

1A PRO RG 6/348

2 Richardson (1850); John William Steel (1899) A Historical Sketch of the Society of Friends 'in Scorn called Quakers' in Newcastle & Gateshead 1653–1898. London & Newcastle, Headley Bros.; RG 6/226, /527, /628

2A Sansbury, Ruth: Beyond the Blew Stone. 300 Years of Quakers in Newcastle. 1998: Newcastle-upon-Tyne Preparative Meeting; minutes of Newcastle Preparative Meeting (Women’s) 1761–1815, TWAS MF 194; minutes of Newcastle Women’s Monthly Meeting 1803–1814, TWAS MF 182

3 Steel (1899); John Wigham Richardson (1877) Memoir of Anna Deborah Richardson Newcastle: 2; m5 [source reference misplaced]; RG 6/1149; 1827 History, Directory and Gazetteer of Durham and Northumberland; TWAS DX 885/1/28, Acc. 161/4; Durham Registered Wills, DPRI/2/40 p557-558

4 Steel (1899): 195; White's Newcastle & Gateshead Directory, 1847; death certificate; PRO HO 107/824/10 f21 p34

5 Richardson (1877): 2

6 Richardson (1850); death certificate; Steel (1899): 219; death/burial digest; Durham Probate Records, DPRI/1/1848/R5

7 Richardson (1850); Steel (1899); Brooker Pedigrees. Ts at Society of Genealogists' Library




O20. DAVID SUTTON

silhouette of David SuttonDavid Sutton was born on the 11th September 1736, at Scotby, near Carlisle.1

He became a house carpenter. He lived with his parents till about 25, then moved to Newcastle. When he left the parental roof for Newcastle, his father accompanied him on foot a few miles. When they parted David became very thoughtful; and proceeding a little onward, he stopped by the wayside, "where he was led to supplicate the Lord, like the patriarch of old; beseeching that He would be with him whither he was going."2

The 1768 certificate of removal sent by Carlisle meeting described him as a man "of good esteem being of sober and orderly conduct and exemplary life [and who] was a diligent attender of meetings and a member in good unity amongst us."2A

On the 14th April 1768, at Newcastle meeting house, he married, first, [O39] Rebecca Moor, whom he had met at Newcastle meeting. Their children were: William (1770–1791), Thomas (1771 – before 1828), and [O19] Deborah (1773–1848). At the birth of each child he was described as a grocer, of Newcastle.3

In 1773 he was made an overseer and an elder, which he remained for 56 years.4

Rebecca died on 2 January 1783, at which date her husband was a grocer "on the Key".5

In 1785 he had as his resident housekeeper in Newcastle Jane Nickle, later second wife of [O4] John Richardson.6

In 1788 he had £1 3s. 8d. taken from him, by distraint. In 1791 he was listed as a grocer and tea-dealer in Newcastle.6A

On 26 September 1792 David Sutton, grocer and merchant of Newcastle, married Margaret Dodshon of Bishop Auckland (1749–1827), his second wife, at Durham Friends' meeting house. About 1795 or 1797 he retired from business. He subsequently spent much of his time in the exercise of gardening, which he believed contributed to the preservation of his mental as well as bodily vigour, and was almost daily engaged in kind and fatherly visits to his relations and friends, many of whom were often edified and instructed by his counsel and example.7 In 1800 he was a witness at his grandson’s wedding at Newcastle. In October 1802 he was one of two Newcastle representatives at Monthly Meeting, as he was in January, April, August and November 1806. In March, June, September and December 1806 he and Margaret attended as two of the four representatives from Newcastle at the Monthly Meeting of Ministers and Elders; both were Elders, and continued to attend these meetings every quarter until March 1814. In July 1806 he was one of three Friends appointed to investigate Joshua Watson’s clearness to marry, and to publish his and Esther Watson’s marriage intention at Newcastle first day meeting. In November that year he presented the accounts for the fund for the new meeting house, to which he had personally subscribed £100. In February 1807, described as a gentleman of Newcastle, he and Margaret and two others signed articles of agreement for the purchase of a fee farm rent at Coundon, Durham, for which he would receive fee farm rent of 8s. p.a. He attended Monthly Meeting in March (with Isaac Richardson), August, October, November and December 1807, and in March (with Joshua Watson), April, July, August (with Isaac Richardson), September, and December (with Joshua Watson) 1809.7A

A curious incident is recounted in a letter of Eleanor Richardson’s to her husband, dated 6 August 1809:

 

We had last 5th day here a severe thunderstorm. My brother and his bride, W.R. and his bride with their attendants, were at our friend D. Sutton’s taking tea returning the Bride’s visits, and had just done when it began to rain very heavy. M. Sutton desired her husband to go upstairs to shut down the window in their chamber. D.S. was within two yards of the window when a fire ball entered and directed its course across their bed, seized the bell wire, rent their bed post, in short, it went nearly all through the house, it broke all the glass in one window, 4 panes in another, 3 in another, and 2 panes in another window, tore up several boards in the floor where the wire took its course, and tore away the ceiling in the staircase in several places rent the book-case from top to bottom in the parlour. M. Sutton was sitting getting her tea after the others had done, and it overthrew the coffee-biggin, broke two saucers and one coffee cup, and much more too tedious to mention. The young folks were some of them much alarmed; R.R. so much so as to faint away. Dear D. Sutton appears thankful for his narrow escape, but if he had been taken I apprehend he is readier than most. I wish all were as well prepared.7B

He was one of two Newcastle representatives at Monthly Meeting in April, July, September and December 1810. At the July meeting he was one of three men appointed to investigate Robert Spence’s clearness for marriage. He represented Newcastle at Monthly Meeting in February, April and December 1811, and was one of the four representatives at Quarterly Meeting in September. At the April meeting he and Hadwen Bragg were given the keys to the safe holding the title deeds for the meeting house. In September 1811, a merchant of Newcastle upon Tyne, he agreed a bond for £300 at 5% with George and John Dixon of Cockfield. He attended Monthly Meeting again in October 1812 and April 1813. In January 1813, with Bragg, he was appointed to visit the newly-arrived Robert and Margaret Foster, reporting in October.7C

There is another glimpse of David Sutton in a letter from Hadwen Bragg to George Richardson and Daniel Oliver, from 1813:

 

Our dear friend, D. Sutton, feels much stripped and tried when you are all absent. He keeps nicely in health, and is often looking in at the workmen in the Meeting House.7D

He represented Newcastle at Monthly Meeting in January and August 1814, at Monthly Meeting of Ministers and Elders in September, and at Quarterly Meeting in June. In March and September 1815 he was one of the four attending Quarterly Meeting, on the latter occasion joined by Robert Foster. He was at Monthly Meeting in January 1817, with Margaret at Monthly Meeting of Ministers and Elders in March, and with Robert Foster at Quarterly Meeting in September. He attended Monthly Meeting in July and November 1820, March and December 1821, and August 1822; he similarly attended Quarterly Meeting in March 1821 and March 1823.7E

 

In the maintenance of Friends' discipline he was very useful; knowing its value well: and being of a weighty discerning spirit, he was a firm and upright pillar in the church. When required to deal with delinquents, the meekness, tenderness, and long-suffering which he evinced, united to much firmness and decision in support of Christian testimonies, gained him the esteem and affection of many of those who found the narrow path which he recommended too straight for themselves to walk in. His manner of verbally answering the queries relative to the state of the Society in the Preparative Meetings, in order that they might be committed to writing, was often peculiarly discriminating and instructive; and this talent continued with him up to the last year of his life. On one of these occasions, when about ninety years of age, in speaking of the diligent attendance of meetings on week days, he appealed to such as plead that they have not time to spare for this purpose in a most solemn and impressive manner. It was his frequent practice, on the approach of times of public excitement and temptation, to give an affectionate caution to his young Friends to beware of being drawn aside from the paths of virtue by giving way to the desire after vain sports or other improper indulgences. This he occasionally did at the close of a meeting for worship.8

In September 1824 the Suttons were visited by Joseph John Gurney, who noted in his diary . . . "the old man 88, and his wife a complete invalid. There was true life to be felt in their company."8A

David Sutton attended Monthly Meeting at Sunderland in July 1825, and he and Margaret attended Monthly Meeting of Ministers and Elders in December 1826. Margaret died on 2 June 1827. David attended Monthly Meeting of Ministers and Elders in December 1827 and December 1828, as well as Monthly Meeting in January 1828.9

On the 19th December 1827 David Sutton made his will:9A

 

I David Sutton of the Town and County of Newcastle upon Tyne being of a disposing mind and considering the uncertainty of that summons from time to eternity am therefore mindful to settle my outward affairs and that real and personal estate the Lord hath favoured me with do therefore leave order and dispose of the same in and by this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following viz I order my Executors hereinafter named to pay my debts and funeral expences I do give and devise unto my Grandson William Sutton my messuage and tenement with the appurtenance in Mosley Street in Newcastle aforesaid and now in the occupation of my Grandson William Sutton To have and to hold the said premises with my said Grandson William Sutton for and during his natural life and the heirs of his body lawfully to be begotten and in default of such lawful heirs I then give and devise the same unto the Children of my daughter Deborah Richardson that is to say, unto my grandsons John Richardson and Edward Richardson and my Granddaughters Rebecca Richardson and Ann Richardson to have and to hold unto them their heirs and assigns my aforesaid messuage and tenement with the appurtenances as tenants in common and not as joint Tenants I also give and bequeath unto my said Grandson William Sutton Five hundred pounds I give and bequeath unto my daughter in Law Mary Sutton mother of the said William Sutton Sixty pounds I give and bequeath unto my said daughter Deborah Richardson seven hundred pounds I give and bequeath to the said children of my said daughter Deborah Richardson viz John Edward Rebecca and Ann Five hundred pounds a piece but should either one or both of my said Grand daughters die before they attain the age of Twenty one years I direct that the respective share or shares of those so dying shall be equally divided between the survivor and their said Brothers John and Edward I give and devise to my Grandson Edward Richardson aforesaid his heirs and assigns all that my freehold messuage and tenement with the appurtenances in Princes Street in Newcastle upon Tyne aforesaid and now in my own occupation I give and bequeath unto my said Grandchildren John Richardson, Edward Richardson, Rebecca Richardson and Ann Richardson all my furniture plate Linen and books to be equally divided amongst them, I constitute and appoint my said Grandsons John Richardson and Edward Richardson Executors of this my last Will and testament to each of whom in consideration of the trouble they will have in the execution of this my Will I give and bequeath thirty pounds and finally all the rest residue and remainder of all my estate and effects real and personal whatsoever and wheresoever not herein otherwise disposed of I do give and bequeath and devise to my executors before named John Richardson and Edward Richardson their heirs and assigns upon trust to divide the said residuary real and personal estate equally and share and share alike amongst and unto themselves the said John and Edward and unto their sisters Rebecca and Ann the Children of my daughter Deborah Richardson aforesaid to whom I give and devise the same In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this nineteenth day of the twelfth 1827—David Sutton Ls—Signed sealed published and declared by the Testator David Sutton as and for his last Will and Testament in the presence of us who at his request and in his presence and in the presence of each other have subscribed our names as witnesses thereof—Anthy Clapham—Geo Brumell Geo Atley Brumell—

From 1827 to 1829 he is described as a gentleman, of 16 Princes Street, Newcastle. For his last 40 years he "suffered from a tendency to dropsy in his legs". About two years before his death, he was confined by illness to the house for several months. He performed the services of overseer and elder until within the last month of his life, being favoured to retain his mental faculties as well as his spiritual perception with extraordinary strength and clearness. "The precious and heavenly sweetness that clothed his spirit and seasoned his conversation was instructive and edifying." He was enabled to sit through a Monthly Meeting till within a few weeks of his death. In his last illness he was confined to the house for about five weeks. Though at times his sufferings were great, through oppression in his breathing, yet he was serene and at times cheerful. He finally fell into a gentle sleep and died, on the 20th February 1829. Aged 92, he had lived to see six generations of his family. His body was buried in plot 12 of the Pilgrim Street graveyard, Newcastle. David Sutton was described as a grocer, late of Princes Street in the Chapel of St Andrew Newcastle upon Tyne. His will was proved on 14 April 1829 by John and Edward Richardson, executors; the estate was valued at under £5000 (£247,450 at 2005 values).10

David Sutton was the fourth child, and third son, of [O21] William and [O31] Mary Sutton.11

 

1 TNA: PRO RG 6/1388

2 PRO RG 6/1260; Annual Monitor 1830; John William Steel (1899) A Historical Sketch of the Society of Friends 'in Scorn called Quakers' in Newcastle & Gateshead 1653–1898. London & Newcastle, Headley Bros. : 117-9

2A Ruth Sansbury (1998) Beyond the Blew Stone. 300 Years of Quakers in Newcastle. Newcastle-upon-Tyne Preparative Meeting

3 RG 6/485, /776, /1011, /1260, /1334, /1388; Sansbury (1998); Tyne & Wear Archives Service 1441/89

4 Annual Monitor 1830

5 RG 6/485, /1150; Brooker Pedigrees. Ts at Society of Genealogists' Library; Tyne & Wear Archives Service 1441/89; Newcastle Courant, 1783-01-04

6 George Richardson (1850) The Annals of the Cleveland Richardsons. Newcastle

6A Steel (1899): 56; Universal British Directory

7 Annual Monitor 1830; Steel (1899): 119; RG 6/348; Brooker Pedigrees. Ts at Society of Genealogists' Library

7A RG 6/527; Newcastle Courant, 1792-09-29

7B, D Steel (1899): 90, 78

7C Minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting, TWAS MF 167 & 168; TWAS Acc. 161/3; list of removals, Newcastle Monthly Meeting, TWAS MF 168

7E Minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting, TWAS MF 168 & 169; minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting of Ministers & Elders, TWAS MF 180

8 Annual Monitor 1830; Steel (1899): 119-20

8A Joseph Bevan Braithwaite, ed. (1854) Memoirs of Joseph John Gurney. 2 vols, Norwich: Fletcher & Alexander, I:272

9 Minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting, TWAS MF 169; minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting of Ministers and Elders, TWAS MF 180; Brooker Pedigrees. Ts at Society of Genealogists' Library; RG 6/226; Newcastle Courant, 1827-06-23

9A Durham Registered Wills, DPRI/2/40 p557-558

10 Steel (1899): 119-20 & 219; Annual Monitor 1830; DQB; Sansbury (1998); RG 6/228, /778; 1827 History, Directory and Gazetteer of Durham and Northumberland; 1829–9 Pigot’s Directory.; Durham Registered Wills, DPRI/2/40 p557-558

11 RG 6/1011; Brooker Pedigrees. Ts at Society of Genealogists' Library




O21. WILLIAM SUTTON

William Sutton was born in Scotby on the 5th March 1704/5.1

Still living at Scotby, he married [O31] Mary Savage on the 10th December 1730, at Penrith, Cumberland. Their children were: Mary (1729 – ?), William (1731–1815), Thomas (1733–1733), Sarah (1734–1775), [O20] David (1736–1829), John (1738–1814), Thomas (1741–1783), and Joseph (1743–1836).2

In 1772 he was described as a cabinet maker, of Scotby. At the time of his death he was a yeoman of Scotby, Weathrel, Cumberland, and "a man Who loved Pease and good order among Friends and Neighbours."3

He died on the 22nd September 1792, "in much quietness", and was buried on the 25th, in Scotby.4

William Sutton was the second child and second son of [O22] David Sutton , and the eldest child of [O27] Esther Sutton .5

 

1 TNA: PRO RG 6/1388

2 PRO RG 6/1246, /1388

3 RG 6/134, /1011, /1388

4 RG 6/1388

5 RG 6/1388; Brooker Pedigrees. Ts at Society of Genealogists' Library




O22. DAVID SUTTON

David Sutton was born on the 19th July 1670, at Clifton, his birth being registered in Scotby.1

He married, firstly, Dorkas Jackson, on the 8th January 1698/9, at Eglonbye; at that date he lived in Scotby. They had one child: John (1700–1730). Dorkas having died in March 1701/2, he married secondly [O27] Esther Bond, on the 24th May 1704, at Scotby, where he spent the rest of his life. Their children were: [O21] William (1704/5–1792), David (1707–1789), Barbara (1709–1711), Esther (1711 – before 1777), Joseph (1714–1790), Ann (1716 – ?), Mary (1719 – ?), Benjamin (1721–1785), and Barbara (1724–1727).2

He died on the 25th December 1740, and was buried in Scotby on the 28th.3

David Sutton was the fifth child, and third son, of [O23] John and [O26] Ann Sutton.4

 

1 Tyne & Wear Archives Service 1441/89; TNA: PRO RG 6/1388

2 PRO RG 6/1388; Brooker Pedigrees. Ts at Society of Genealogists' Library

3 RG 6/1388

4 RG 6/1388; Brooker Pedigrees




O23. JOHN SUTTON

John Sutton married [O26] Ann Tinkler ('Anas Tinlar') on 1 August 1650, at Clifton, Westmorland. Their children were: John (1651–1716), Edmond (1657–1688), Barbary (1659/60–1706), Rebekah (1662–1739), Thomas (1665–1712), [O22] David (1670–1740), Ruth (1672–1699), Mary (1674–1755), and Jennett (1677/8–1743).1

He lived in Clifton, Westmorland. In 1675/6, with two others, he was distrained for Absence from the National Worship, goods to the value of £1 2s. 0d. being taken. In 1678 he had lands to the yearly value of 10s. seized by Exchequer process, levied at 14s; with others, in 1677 and 1678 he had goods seized by Exchequer process, valued at £1 9s 0d. In 1679, for breach of the Act against Conventicles, "they took a Caldron and a Brass Pot worth 14s." Around 1684 he was prosecuted under the statue made against Popish recusants. Over the period 1681/1690 he had corn and other things taken out of the field to the value of £17 3s. 10d., for tithes.2

Of Clifton, his body was buried on 24 November 1686, the event being recorded by Strickland MM.3

John Sutton was the son of O24 ____ and O25 Sutton.4


1 Brooker Pedigrees. Ts at Society of Genealogists’ Library; email from Kent Bartram 2007-03-02; Ancestry public member trees; FamilySearch; TNA: PRO RG 6/1206; British Isles Vital Record Index, 2nd edition

2 PRO RG 6/1388; Brooker Pedigrees; Joseph Besse (2000) Sufferings of Early Quakers. Westmorland &c. York, Sessions: 35–6

3 RG 6/1206, /1246

4 email from Kent Bartram 2007-03-02



O24. ____ SUTTON

____ Sutton married [O25] ____ ____.1

Their children were [O23] John (? – 1686), Edmond (? – ?), and Thomas (? – ?).2

 

1–2  email from Kent Bartram 2007-03-02



O25. ____ SUTTON born ____

____ ____ married [O24] ____ Sutton.1

Their children were [O23] John (? – 1686), Edmond (? – ?), and Thomas (? – ?).2

 

 1–2  email from Kent Bartram 2007-03-02



O26. ANN SUTTON born TINKLER

Ann Tinkler ("Anas Tinlar") married [O23] John Sutton on 1 August 1650, at Clifton, Westmorland. Their children were: John (1651–1716), Edmond (1657–1688), Barbary (1659/60–1706), Rebekah (1662–1739), Thomas (1665–1712), [O22] David (1670–1740), Ruth (1672–1699), Mary (1674–1755), and Jennett (1677/8–1743).1

She died in 1714, and was buried at Strickland on 15 March 1714/5, described as of Clifton.2

 

1 TNA: PRO RG 6/1206, /1229; Brooker Pedigrees. Ts at Society of Genealogists' Library; email from Kent Bartram, 2007-03-02; Ancestry public member trees; FamilySearch; British Isles Vital Record Index, 2nd edition

2 Brooker Pedigrees; PRO RG 6/1246


O27. ESTHER SUTTON born BOND

Esther Bond was born on the 18th June 1680, her birth being registered in Scotby.1

She married [O22] David Sutton on the 24th May 1704, at Scotby, where she lived at that date. Their children were: [O21] William (1704/5–1792), David (1707–1789), Barbara (1709–1711), Esther (1711 – before 1777), Joseph (1714–1790), Ann (1716 – ?), Mary (1719 – ?), Benjamin (1721–1785), and Barbara (1724–1727).2

She died on the 18th June 1766, and was buried in Scotby on the 20th.3

Esther Bond was the eldest child of [O28] Isaac and [O30A] Jane Bond.4

 

1 TNA: PRO RG 6/1388

2 PRO RG 6/1388; Brooker Pedigrees. Ts at Society of Genealogists' Library

3 RG 6/1388

4 RG 6/1388; Brooker Pedigrees says she was the daughter of John Bond, but I follow RG 6/1388 as the better source.









O28. ISAAC BOND

Isaac Bond was born in Scotby on the 6th January 1652/3.1

A 1678 deed records the "Admittance in the manor court of Scotby of Isaac Bond son of William Bond deceased to a messuage and tenement at an annual rent of 12s. 8d." Another records his admittance to "a messuage and tenement at an annual rent of 8s. 9d."1A

He married [O30A] Jane ____ before 1680, at which time he lived in Scotby. Their children were: [O27] Esther, Josiah (1682 – ?), William (1684 – after 1717), Sarah (1687–1780), Elizabeth (1689 – ?), and Isaak (1692 – ?), all b. Scotby.2

In 1681 "Isaac Bond of Scotby had taken from him by John Dobinson, John Coxson, John Fisher & John Dalton all of Aglionby Farmers, to Francis Howard of Corby Impropriator 35 Shocks of Corn to the value of £2.1–."2A

In 1682 "Isaac Bond had taken from him [ . . . ] 6 shocks & 7 sheaves of Rye; 21 shocks of Bigg, & 22 of Oats, worth £2.8–. Again taken from him [ . . . ] Hay worth 9s. } £2.17–."2A

In the following year was "Taken from Isaac Bond of Scotby 41 stouks worth £1.14–." Also,

 

"For 2 Thirds of his Estate" "Isaac Bond was Indicted on the Statute made against Popish Recusants & had Goods Taken from him worth £15.10– shewing no warrant. The Sheriff told the former was for 4 years last past 40s yearly, one whereof had been Distrained on before; the latter for £20 a month, for 6 months absence."2A

In 1684 was "Taken from Isaac Bond by the said Farmers 66 sks Bigg, Oats, and Pease, worth £2.8.2" and "Taken from Isaac Bond by the same men Hay value –.8.6."2A

And in 1685 "Taken from Isaac Bond of Scotby [ . . . ] 42 shocks of Corn worth £2.5s.6d."2A

At the Cumberland Quarter Sessions, Epiphany 1691/2, Friends petitioned for a licence for a meeting in Isaac Bond's house at Scotby.3

Still of Scotby, he died on 21 March 1692/3, and his burial on 23 March was recorded by Scotby Preparative Meeting.4

Isaac Bond was the son of [O29] Willyam and [O30] ____ Bond.5

 

1 TNA: PRO RG 6/1388

1A A2A

2 PRO RG 6/1388

2A Great Book of Sufferings, Vol. 3 pt 1

3 A2A

4–5 RG 6/1388


O29. WILLIAM BOND

An undated deed, apparently from about 1647, records "Articles of agreement between Robert Dobinson of Scotby and William Bond of Scotby referring to a bargain and sale of an acre of arable land, a barn and ovenhouse in Scotby and adding that as part of the agreement for the purchase of the property of William Bond has undertaken to perform office of constable, pay all church dues, keep a night watch and repair the pound fold wall." This catalogue entry is regrettably ambiguous.0

A 1649 deed records a "Bargain and sale for £5.12.6 by Leonard Younge of Scotby, yeoman, to William Bond of half an acre of arable ground in Scotby called Cutcroft lying between the ground of William Bond on the south east and the ground of Edward Gibson on the north west paying a yearly rent of 2d to the lord of the fee."0

A 1650 deed records a "Bargain and sale for £7.10.0 by Richard How of Scotby to William Bond of Scotby . . . Scotby/of a meadow close in White Hill, Scotby, measuring ½ a day work or there abouts with two parcels of grass ground measuring about 1½ acres paying 5d a year to the lord of the fee." A further deed that year describes William Bond as a carpenter of Scotby.0

A 1651 deed records a "Bargain and sale for £45 by Richard Harrison, yeoman, to William Bond both of Scotby, carpenter, of half of his tenement in Scotby, paying 7s.8d to lord of fee." In the same year he is also described as a yeoman.0

"Willyam" Bond lived in Scotbe in 1652.1

A 1656 deed records an "Exchange between William Atkinson and William Bond both of Scotby, yeomen, of 6 roods of arable land called Midlam in Scotby Holme, bounded by lands of Christopher Slatter on the east and lands of William Bond on the west, one rood of arable land " and about more" in the park called "Kell" bounded by lands of John Hoope on the east and one rood of arable in Cutcroft in return for other lands unspecified and the sum of £4.5s.0d."0

A deed of 1657/8 records a "Surrender in the manor court of Scotby by Robert Dobinson to William Bond of a parcel of ground called Whitte Hill and a parcel of ground purchased from Robert How." A further deed records the "Admittance in the manor court of Scotby of William Bond to half a messuage and tenement of a yearly rent of 7s 8d. formerly in the possession of Robert Dobinson."0

In 1658/9 William Bond is again described as a carpenter.0

In 1662, with two others, he "suffered about seven Months Imprisonment, having been arrested for Tithes at the Suit of Francis Howard of Corby, a Papist, who afterward at the Assizes obtained Judgement against them for treble Damages, upon which were taken from . . . William Bond, for a Demand of 7s. a Mare and Steer (£3.15.0d.)."2

A fuller account is given in The First Publishers of Truth, as follows:

In the year 1653, came ffrancis Howgill, of Sunnibank in Grayrigge, in Westmorland, who had been a teacher of a people in these parts [ . . . ], and wth him Thomas Stubbs, of Dalston, in Cumberland, who had been a Soldier and had laid down Arms, & received Truth; they came together to the house of William Bond, Carpenter, in Scotby, where they kept a Meeting, he receiving them and their Message freely; and although this meeting was attended wth a Rabble yt some thought they should have pulled down ye house, yet there was but little of Contraversie yt appeared, for the Lords power prevailed, & several were convinced yt day, who continued faithfull, & finished in ye faith.

William Bond and his Wife receiving Truth, & one Adam Robinson, of Holm gate, and Thomas Graham, of Aglionby, being convinced, they four mett on Warwick moor wth some others yt resorted to them, and at William Bond’s, in Scotby, & at Adam Robinson’s, at Holm gate, and some times on Aglionby moor; thus ye Lord began his great work, and as ye Metting came to be settled, ye Enemie in his Jnstruments began to rage, for his kingdom was like to be shaken, and great stirr there was amongst ye people.

. . . After yt, one Dorothy Waugh, of Westmorland, came to ye house of Will Bond, and went from there to Carlisle, and declared Truth in ye streets on a market day. . . .

About ye year 1661, John Richardson, of Scotby, and his Wife, were convinced; [ . . . ] not long after his convincement, he, wth William Bond, Adam Robinson, & Thomas Graham, for refusing to pay tithes were committed to Carlisle prison amongst ye Fellons, into a nasty, stinking place where they were like to be stifled for want of air.

After some time, ffrancis Howard, their adversary, being ye Jmpropriator, did bring an Habeas Corpus writt in order to remove them to London, and set forward with them; and as they were on their way, some frds did perswade them to appear to ye writt, which they did, and it came to a tryall at Carlisle Assizes, and went against the friends. Judgement was given, & goods distrained & sold; great havock was made, but nothing returned, so that their sufferings were heavy, both by rude people and by colour of Law. But as they stood faithfull, ye Lord made their way easier, both by giving them dominion in spirit, and by takeing of the edge of their adversaries, and making way for the spreading of truth, . . . .

Divers more were convinced in divers places in ye Countrey and in Carlisle, who became members of this Meeting, for there was a great convincement in these parts, and alsoe sufferings again were mett wth, by Jnformers upon ye Conventicle Act, and as Papist Recusants in forfeiting two thirds of their Estates, and distress was severall times made of John Richardson’s and William Bond’s goods by Sheriffs bayliffs, who some times would have kept part in their own hands, and made no returne of them; and when application was made to Charles Howard, who was Lord Lieutenant of the Northern Counties, or to his son Edward, who was called Lord of Morpeth, they blunted the edge of their persecuting spirits, and caused some of the Bayliffs to Return part of the goods again, wch they had taken away, thus the Lord made way for his Truth & people to gain ground, even by ye great ones of the earth and them in authority, . . . .

Now whereas Will Bond was one of ye first yt received Truth in this part of the Country, so he entertained friends and Meettings freely so long as he lived, as alsoe did Jno Richardson whilst he lived, for the Meeting was generally at their two houses for many years . . . .3

The meeting house in Scotby was in William Bond's farmstead, opposite the village pub.3A

A deed of 1673 records "Articles of agreement for a bargain and sale for £100 between William Atkinson of Scotby yeoman, and William Bond of Scotby yeoman, of a messuage and customary tenement in Scotby with a rood of land in the Shoult Broads, a rood of land in the Guldeld, half an acre in the Farr parke yate and a meadow in the Woolcastles." A further deed that year records the "Surrender in the manor court of Scotby by William Atkinson to William Bond of a messuage and appurtenances in Scotby at an annual rent of 12s. 8d."0

William Bond married [O30] ____ ____. Their children were: [O28] Isaac (1652/3–1692/3), John (1654 – ?), Joseph (1655/6 – ?), Esther (1657/8–1677/8), and Stheven (1659/60–1661). Of Scotby, William Bond died and was buried on 14 March 1677/8, the event being registered by Scotby Preparative Meeting.4

 

0 A2A

1 TNA: PRO RG 6/1388

2 Joseph Besse (2000) Sufferings of Early Quakers. Westmorland &c.. York, Sessions: 128

3 Norman Penney, ed. (1907) The First Publishers of Truth

3A VisitorUK

4 PRO RG 6/1388

O30. ____ BOND born ____

____ ____ married [O29] William Bond. Their children were: [O28] Isaac (1652/3–1692/3), John (1654 – ?), Joseph (1655/6 – ?), Esther (1657/8–1677/8), and Stheven (1659/60 – ?).1

 

1 TNA: PRO RG 6/1388

O30A. JANE BOND born ____

____ ____ married [O28] Isaac Bond, before 1680. Their children were: [O27] Esther, Josiah (1682 – ?), William (1684 – after 1717), Sarah (1687–1780), Elizabeth (1689 – ?), and Isaak (1692 – ?), all b. Scotby.1

1 TNA: PRO RG 6/1388

 


O31. MARY SUTTON born SAVAGE

Mary Sutton of Clifton was born at Strickland on 18 March 1706/7.1

She married [O21] William Sutton at Penrith, on the 10th December 1730. Their children were: Mary (1729 – ?), William (1731–1815), Thomas (1733–1733), Sarah (1734–1775), [O20] David (1736–1829), John (1738–1814), Thomas (1741–1783), and Joseph (1743–1836).2

She "was indead a woman much beloved I think by Every one who was aqainted with hier", wrote the clerk who recorded her burial. She died in much quietness on the 24th November 1802, "and I believe made a very Peasful Close." Of Scotby, she was buried there on the 28th.3

Mary Savage was the daughter of [O32] Thomas and [O36] Alice Savage.4

1 Brooker Pedigrees. Ts at Society of Genealogists' Library; TNA: PRO RG 6/383, /464, /1246, /1388; Tyne & Wear Archives Service 1441/89

2 RG 6/1246, /1388

3 RG 6/383, /464, /1388

4 RG 6/383, /464, /1246, /1388; Brooker Pedigrees; source mislaid

O32. THOMAS SAVAGE

Thomas Savage was born on 5 May 1675.1

Of Clifton, and of Strickland Head meeting, he married [O36] Alice Hadwen at Kendal, on 14 June 1699. Their children were: Thomas (1700–1731), Isaac (1702/3–1723), [O31] Mary (1706/7–1802), Hannah (1709/10–1774), Jonathan (1712–1804), Jeremiah (1714–1714), Sarah (1715/6 – ?), and Rachel (1718 – ?). Thomas was described as of Clifton in 1700, 1702/3, 1706/7, 1730, 1731, and 1733.1

He was probably a clockmaker by profession, as were two of his sons.3

According to an article in the Westmorland Gazette in April 1996, in 1745 the army of Bonnie Prince Charlie was retreating north, back from Derby. The weary rearguard was in a sorry site, short of transport, and ammunition. At Clifton, on the borders of Westmorland with Cumberland, the English army caught up with the Scots rearguard. The Scots set an ambush for the English, as it began to get dark. 'The Brave Quaker' Thomas Savage of Town End Farm saw them and warned the Kings men to look about them and see how the town was filled with men. He then returned to his farm and locked himself in together with his daughter in law, mistress of the house. She locked herself in the kitchen cupboard. Outside in the town a skirmish between the Scots and English occurred, but Bonnie Prince Charlie ordered the Scots to March back to Carlisle, so the English took over.

After the heat of the battle, Thomas Savage stated that someone came and broke in at his court door, calling sharply to open up, they thought the house was full of rebels; but Thomas called and said he would open the door. The first words said to Thomas were "Could the Duke lodge there tonight" to which he said yes. The Duke was the Duke of Cumberland, son of George II.4

A minister about 18 years, Thomas Savage died on 28 May 1754, in the catchment area of Strickland Monthly Meeting, and was buried at Penrith on 30 May.5

Thomas Savage was the son of [O33] Thomas Savage.6

 

 

1 letter from Norman Penney, LSF, to Gilbert Gilkes, 1915-01-02, Cumbria RO WD/PW/3/23; information from Dorothy Spencer; TNA: PRO RG 6/1118

2 letter from Norman Penney, LSF, to Gilbert Gilkes, 1915-01-02, Cumbria RO WD/PW/3/23; PRO RG 6/1118, /1206, /1246, /1388, /1543; Savage pedigree compiled by Kevin Karney

3 email to me from Brian Loomes, author of Watchmakers and Clockmakers of the World, 2015-06-20

4 information from Dorothy Spencer

5 letter from Norman Penney, LSF, to Gilbert Gilkes, 1915-01-02, Cumbria RO WD/PW/3/23; information from Dorothy Spencer; RG 6/1118, /1246

6 letter from Norman Penney, LSF, to Gilbert Gilkes, 1915-01-02, Cumbria RO WD/PW/3/23

O33. THOMAS SAVAGE

Thomas Savage was born about 1634. On 10 July 1674 he married [O34] Ann Robinson, at his own house at Clifton. Their children were [O32] Thomas (1675–1754), Jeremiah (1677–1741), Mary (1679–1754), William (1682 – ?), and Joshua (1684/5 – ?).1

From 1708 until his death he was described as of Clifton. His death on 16 May 1721 was registered by Westmorland Quarterly Meeting, and his body was buried at Penrith.2

 

 

1 letter from Norman Penney, LSF, to Gilbert Gilkes, 1915-01-02, Cumbria RO WD/PW/3/23; TNA: PRO RG 6/1206, /1229, /1246

2 letter from Norman Penney, LSF, to Gilbert Gilkes, 1915-01-02, Cumbria RO WD/PW/3/23


O34. ANN SAVAGE born ROBINSON

Ann Robinson married [O33] Thomas Savage on 10 July 1674, at his house at Clifton. Their children were [O32] Thomas (1675–1754), Jeremiah (1677–1741), Mary (1679–1754), William (1682 – ?), and Joshua (1684/5 – ?).1

Her death on 2 December 1708 was recorded by Strickland Monthly Meeting, and her body was buried on the 4th, in the Friends’ burying ground at Penrith.2

Ann Robinson was the daughter of [O35] John Robinson.3

 

1 letter from Norman Penney, LSF, to Gilbert Gilkes, 1915-01-02, Cumbria RO WD/PW/3/23; TNA: PRO RG 6/1206, /1229, /1246

2 PRO RG 6/1206, /1246

3 RG 6/1229


O35. JOHN ROBINSON

John Robinson lived at Raby in 1674.1

 

1 TNA: PRO RG 6/1229


O36. ALICE SAVAGE born HADWEN

Alice Hadwen was born at Sedbergh, Yorkshire, on 3 November 1680.1

Of Kendal, she married [O32] Thomas Savage at Kendal meeting house, on 14 June 1699. Their children were: Thomas (1700–1731), Isaac (1702/3–1723), [O31] Mary (1706/7–1802), Hannah (1709/10–1774), Jonathan (1712–1804), Jeremiah (1714–1714), Sarah (1715/6 – ?), and Rachel (1718 – ?).2

Described as of Clifton from 1700 until her death, her body was buried at Penrith on 25 August 1718.3

Alice Hadwen was the only known child of [O37] Thomas and [O38] Jane Hadwen.4

 

1 TNA: PRO RG 6/1574 (surname given as Hauden); email to me from Brian Loomes, author of Watchmakers and Clockmakers of the World, 2015-06-20

2 letter from Norman Penney, LSF, to Gilbert Gilkes, 1915-01-02, Cumbria RO WD/PW/3/23; TNA: PRO RG 6/1118, /1206, /1246, /1388, /1543; Savage pedigree compiled by Kevin Karney

3 RG 6/1206, /1246

4 RG 6/1574; email to me from Brian Loomes


O37. THOMAS HADWEN

Thomas Hadwen married, first, [O38] Jane Jenkinson, with whom he had one known child: [O36] Alice (1680–1718).1

A yeoman, of Carnforth, on 21 September 1686 he married, secondly, Eling Sands (daughter of Richard Sands), at Lancaster meeting-house. Their children were: Isaac (1687–1737), Joseph (1689/90–1689/90), Mary (1689/90–1750), and Hannah (1693–1758).2

Of [Funstram?], he died in 1697, and was interred at Sedbergh on 7 June that year.3

 

 

1 email to me from Brian Loomes, author of Watchmakers and Clockmakers of the World, 2015-06-20; possibly the reference is to a marriage to Jane Simpkinson on 21 December 1669, at St Oswald's, Warton, Lancashire—"England, Lancashire, Parish Registers 1538–1910," database, FamilySearch accessed 27 December 2015), Thomas Hadwen and Jane Simpkinson, 21 Dec 1669; citing Marriage, St Oswald, Warton, Lancashire, England, volume , Lancashire Record Office, Preston; FHL microfilm 1,849,662

2 TNA: PRO RG 6/1004; email to me from Brian Loomes, author of Watchmakers and Clockmakers of the World, 2015-06-20

3 PRO RG 6/1246; email to me from Brian Loomes, author of Watchmakers and Clockmakers of the World, 2015-06-20

 


O38. JANE HADWEN born JENKINSON

Jane Jenkinson married [O37] Thomas Hadwen. Their children were: Isaac (1687–1737), Joseph (1689/90–1689/90), Mary (1689/90–1750), and Hannah (1693–1758).1

 

 

1 email to me from Brian Loomes, author of Watchmakers and Clockmakers of the World, 2015-06-20; possibly the reference is to a marriage of a Jane Simpkinson to Thomas Hadwen on 21 December 1669, at St Oswald's, Warton, Lancashire—"England, Lancashire, Parish Registers 1538–1910," database, FamilySearch accessed 27 December 2015), Thomas Hadwen and Jane Simpkinson, 21 Dec 1669; citing Marriage, St Oswald, Warton, Lancashire, England, volume , Lancashire Record Office, Preston; FHL microfilm 1,849,662

 


O39. REBECCA SUTTON born MOOR

Rebecca Moor was born about 1734.0

She married [O20] David Sutton on the 14th April 1768, at the meeting house in Newcastle, where she lived at that date (at some stage she was described as "of Wheelbarrow Hall"); a spinster, her parents are not named. Their children were: William (1770–1791), Thomas (1771 – before 1828), and [O19] Deborah (1773–1848).1

She attended monthly meetings in 1772, 1781 and 1782 (at least), as her signature is to be found on on testimonies to the life of deceased friends.1A

She died at Newcastle on 1 January 1783, and her body was buried in Newcastle Friends’ burying ground on the 5th.2

 

0 TNA: PRO RG 6/485, /1150

1 PRO RG 6/1011, /1260; source mislaid; Tyne & Wear Archives Service 1441/89; Ruth Sansbury (1998) Beyond the Blew Stone. 300 Years of Quakers in Newcastle. Newcastle-upon-Tyne Preparative Meeting

1A Sansbury (1998)

2 Tyne & Wear Archives Service 1441/89; RG 6/485, /1150


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