The Spence family of Hampsthwaite and North Shields

 

Robert Spence = Sarah Walker

     |         other children

Robert Spence = Mary Foster

      |         other children

Sarah Spence = Joseph Watson

      |         other children

Robert Spence Watson = Elizabeth Richardson

      |         other children

Mary Spence Watson = Francis Edward Pollard

 

portrait of a young Sarah SpenceN1. SARAH WATSON born SPENCE

Sarah Spence was born in North Shields on the 13th April 1814.1

 

On 22 July 1824, with her sister Mary, she left home for school at Doncaster. On 15 July 1828, with her parents, her eleven siblings, and three servants, she went to Newcastle by steam.2
 

In mid 1830 she fell ill with the measles, and was confined to bed at the same time as seven of her sisters.3

 

signature of Sarah SpenceShe married [M3] Joseph Watson on the 12th March 1835, at the meeting house in North Shields; it was a most interesting occasion, as she was married in a double wedding with her sister, exciting quite a sensation in the town. On the eve of her wedding she had written to Joseph:

 

I wish once more, my beloved friend, to write a line or two to thee as thy own Sarah Spence, since, ere tomorrow’s sun
has set, I shall, in all human probability, be thy own Sarah Watson. How strange it seems to writ the name in black
and white!
. . . Be assured, that so far as lies in my power, to make thee a tolerable wife and a happy home is, and I believe
ever will be, the earnest wish of
                                       Thy sincerely attached,
		                                                         Sarah Spence.
Howard Street,
    11th of the 3rd Month, 1835.4

 

They had twelve children: Lucy (1836–1918), [M2] Robert Spence (1837–1911), Esther Mary (1838–1903), Joseph (1840–1873), William Joshua (1841–1896), Sarah Jane (1842–1848), Emily (1844–1913), Charles John (1846–1846), Helen (1848–1922), Sarah Anna (1849–1849), Herbert (1852–1873), and Gertrude (1854–1930); all births were recorded by Durham Quarterly Meeting, the two eldest (at least) being born at (probably 8) Claremont Place, Gateshead, while Emily was born at Elswick Villas.5

 

Sarah (Spence) WatsonShe wrote a list of ‘Questions for her children, at the close of the sabbath day’:

 

Hast thou endeavoured to seek the Divine aid, to restrain all wandering thoughts, and to perform properly all the duties of the day with a sincere desire to please thy Heavenly Father?
Has thou read, or tried to read, thy Bible attentively and prayerfully?
Has thou done, or tried to do, all that thy loving parents have wished?
Has thou endeavoured to be kind and affectionate to thy brothers and sisters, and to maintain good temper throughout the day?
Has thou prayed for strength to overcome those passions which most easily best thee?
Does the retrospect of this day afford thee more satisfaction than that of days gone by?6

In November 1835 she was one of two Newcastle women appointed to attend Monthly Meeting. In December 1840 she signed the testimony to Margaret Bragg, at Newcastle Monthly Meeting. In 1841 and 1860 she was named in the wills of her father and her husband.7

 

The 1841 census recorded Sarah Watson at Summerhill Terrace, Westgate, Newcastle upon Tyne, living with her husband, four children, two servants, and a third person, probably also a servant.8

 

At the latter end of May 1842 Sarah and her family spent a week visiting her father in North Shields. While there they visited the supposedly haunted Willington Mill, on 23 May.9
 

A poem by her son Robert calls back a memory of his mother:

. . . I hear my mother tell
In the song which cheered my childhood's days, of 'the banks of the blue Moselle.' [ . . . ]
And bright is my gentle mother's face, and sweet is her angel voice,
And weary woe must vanish away, and the toil-worn heart rejoice.10

Robert's friend Henry Tuke Mennell reflected that Robert inherited from his mother "that character of loving sympathy which we all realised and so much appreciated" in her; the "great attraction to that home to us young people was the mother, the most loving and lovable of women" . . .11

 

another photo of Sarah (Spence) WatsonIn 1848 her daughter Sarah Jane died at Gresham Place, Newcastle. In April and October 1849, March 1852, April 1853, February 1854 and August 1858 she attended Monthly Meeting, on behalf of Newcastle Women’s Preparative Meeting. In March 1850 she recorded a memorandum:

This is the fifteenth anniversary of our marriage. May the year now commencing bear, at its close (if life be permitted us), a fairer retrospect for myself, of duties more fully performed towards my dearest husband and children. May I endeavour, with better help, to be a more true helpmate to him than I have hitherto been, endeavouring, as best I can, to lighten or share his many and arduous cares. Oh! how I long that we may help each other in the pursuit of better and more enduring things than any which this world can offer.12

The 1851 census recorded her living at 2 Gresham Place, St Andrew, Newcastle upon Tyne, with her husband, five children, and two house servants. Shortly after October 1853 her father’s estate was finally wound up, upon the last of her siblings attaining their majority; Sarah was presumably the beneficiary of 1/11th (a bit over £2000). In October 1856 she recorded her thoughts on the vanity of speculation about the afterlife.13

 

On 17 January 1861 she and her husband were present at annual examination of the scholars attending the Newcastle Ragged and Industrial Schools. By 1861 Sarah was living at Bensham Grove with her family, with three domestic servants and two visitors. She was one of the two Newcastle women who attended Monthly Meeting at Sunderland in July 1862. In April she took her son Herbert to school in York, staying at Scawin’s Hotel; she wrote him a letter of advice, and wrote again when he left school in March 1865. On 24 August 1865 she and her husband were present at the marriage of their daughter Edith, at the Pilgrim Street meeting house. In January 1866 she wrote "a few words of love and counsel" to Gertrude, on her starting school. Near the end of September 1870 she and her family attended the annual show of the Rothbury Floral and Horticultural Society. At the time of the 1871 census she was living at Bensham Grove with her husband, three daughters, brother-in-law, and three servants. She died there on the 15th August 1871; she died of dysentery, followed by four days' diarrhoea. She had been very feeble for many months, but was still well enough to entertain the idea of going to Rothbury, when she became suddenly worse. For the final days of her life she was quite unconscious. Her daughter-in-law, Elizabeth Spence Watson, recorded that "so lovely did she look in death, so peaceful & happy that we could indeed believe that Death had for her been robbed of its sting." She was buried in Jesmond Cemetery on the 17th of August—a large number of friends following her to the grave.14

 

Among the sentiments expressed in correspondence to Joseph after her death were the following: "Your dear wife was one of the very earliest of the friends whom Mrs. R---- made on coming to Newcastle, and she has always retained a grateful recollection of the many acts of considerate kindness then shewn her." [She was] "simple and unpretending", and "one whose unaffected kindness rendered my two years in Newcastle one of the happiest portions of my life; indeed, your house was more my home than anything else." ". . . her piety, sincere and deep-rooted as it was, was unobtrusive, and was shewn by acts rather than words." . . . "whilst her hopes for eternity were fixed upon her God and Saviour, her earthly affections were all ours." "It was a life that seemed so beautifully, as far as I can judge, to have fulfilled its purpose, and one therefore, which God will find, some higher sphere to fill in the perfect life."15

 

Sarah Spence was the third child and third daughter of [N2] Robert and [N21] Mary Spence.16

 

 

*** For an exhaustive treatment of the lives of Joseph and Sarah Watson, you are welcome to download this .pdf file. Note that it is a very large file—21 Mb. ***

 

 

1 TNA: HO 107/2405 f74 p68, TNA: RG 6/775

2 Philip Spence (1939) Robert and Mary Spence

3 Spence (1939)

4 Spence (1939); RG 6/527, /1245; minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting, TWAS MF 169; In Memoriam Sarah Watson

5 RG 6/1149; The British Friend; Percy Corder (1914) The Life of Robert Spence Watson. London: Headley; Newcastle Courant, 1836-01-09; Newcastle Courant, 1837-06-10; Newcastle Journal, 1844-04-13

6 In Memoriam Sarah Watson

7 Minutes of Newcastle Preparative Meeting (Women’s) 1834–1878, TWAS MF 194; minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting, TWAS MF 169; Death Duty Registers, (IR 26&27)/1722; husband's will

8 HO 107/824/10 f21 p34

9 Robert Spence letters to Robert Foster, in author’s possession; also quoted in Spence, ed. (1939), p. 37

10 Robert Spence Watson: From Far and Near, privately printed: 61

11 Bootham Magazine (York Old Scholars Assn magazine) V.5:370 Nov 1911

12 daughter’s death certificate; minutes of Newcastle Preparative Meeting (Women’s) 1834–1878, TWAS MF 194; In Memoriam Sarah Watson

13 HO 107/2405 f74 p68; father’s will, TNA: PROB 11/2080; In Memoriam Sarah Watson

14 Newcastle Courant, 1861-01-18; Newcastle Courant, 1870-09-02; daughter's death certificate; Corder (1914); census returns (1861: RG 9/3800 f39 p27, 1871: RG 10/5051 f64 p25); Newcastle Journal, 1865-08-24; death certificate; Gateshead Observer 19 Aug 1871; Elizabeth Spence Watson: 'Family Chronicles/Home Records', and supplement; minutes of Newcastle Preparative Meeting (Women’s) 1834–1878, TWAS MF 194; In Memoriam Sarah Watson

15 In Memoriam Sarah Watson

16 RG 6/228, /404, 628, /775, /1245; Spence, op. cit.



N2. ROBERT SPENCE

miniature of Robert SpenceRobert Spence was born on the 10th February 1784, at Whaite Mill House, Hartwith come Winsley, Kirby Malzard, Yorkshire. The house still exists, though it's now somewhat dilapidated.1

 

Around 1788–9 he was inoculated against smallpox. He was, however, already infected, and came down with the disease, during which he was blind for eleven days.2

 

He was taught locally at first, then for a time at a boarding school at Burntyeats. From 1794 to 1796 he was at Ackworth school, still usually residing at Hartwith. He then went on to Gildersome school for a year (he was there in April 1797).3

 

From Gildersome he returned to his mother's to assist in farming operations.4

 

He became apprenticed in the drapery business to his brother John Spence of Yarm, where he next went. While there, he formed an attachment with a young woman "of a very respectable family, but her circumstances in life rather low." Following the disapproval of his relatives, he eventually broke it off. In 1804, shortly before his apprenticeship expired, he was released to go into partnership with Joseph Procter as a linen and woollen draper in North Shields. On putting up his share of the capital, he was to take a third of the profits from the 1st April 1805.5

 

In August 1807 he visited William Wordsworth; from a later period (1829 and 1835) two letters survive from Wordsworth to Robert Spence, referring to his father-in-law Robert Foster.6

 

In 1808 he lived at the Wooden Bridge. In April 1809 he was made an overseer of the poor for North Shields; he had been on the committee since at least December 1808. In the next month he suffered an attack of typhus fever. In November 1808, in March, September and December 1809, and in January, March, June and July 1810, he was one of two representatives from Shields at Newcastle Monthly Meeting. In September 1809 he was one of four Monthly Meeting representatives to Quarterly Meeting.7

 

On 11 August 1808 Robert wrote to Robert Foster, desiring to visit Hebblethwaite now that Foster had learned of his attachment to his daughter Mary; the sensitively written letter appears defensive, as he should have spoken with Foster first. In July 1810 Monthly Meeting appointed David Sutton, Joseph Unthank and Thomas Robson to inquire into Robert’s clearness to marry. No obstacles were found, and on the 29th August 1810 he married [N21] Mary Foster, at Brigflats meeting house. Not long afterwards the business of Procter & Spence, Woollen drapers, and agents for Sir Chas Loraine & Co was removed from the Wooden Bridge (the Low Street) to the house at the corner of Howard Street and Tyne Street. The ground floor was converted into a shop, and Robert and Mary lived upstairs. The business sold a wide range of items, including bombazine, tartan, carpet and hats.8

 

The couple had 18 children, though not all survived: Mary (1811–1811), Mary (1813–1873), [N1] Sarah (1814–1871), Elizabeth Foster (1815–1876), Rachel (1816–1844), Robert (1817–1890), John Foster (1818–1901), Joseph (1819–1889), Thomas (1821–1839), Jane (1823–1845), Ann (1824–1824), Margaret (1824–1824), Ann (1825–1859), Margaret (1825–1851), Hannah Maria (1827–1856), Frances (1829–1829), Emma (1830–1855), and Lucy Fisher (1832–1858); all were born at Howard Street, North Shields. At the registration of each birth (1811–1832) Robert was described as a draper (in 1815 a linen & woollen draper, specifically).9

 

In October 1810, in February, April and November 1811, and in February, July, August and September 1812, he was one of the Shields representatives to Monthly Meeting. In September 1811 he was appointed as a Monthly Meeting representative to Quarterly Meeting. In August 1812 he first signed the Monthly Meeting minutes as Clerk. On the 7th January 1813 he appeared before the Lieutenant at Newcastle on account of being balloted for the local Militia.10

 

In November 1813, in March, May, September, November and December 1814, July and September 1815, in June, August, November and December 1816, in July, October and December 1817, and in January, March, May, August, October and December 1818 he was a Shields representative to Monthly Meeting. From December 1814 Myles Birket Foster was his assistant Clerk. That quarter Robert was one of the four representatives to Quarterly Meeting, as he was again in June 1816, September 1817 (with David Sutton), and December 1817. In February 1818 he stood down as Clerk in favour of Myles Birket Foster.11

 

In 1818 his business diversified: on the 1st August he went into co-partnership with Chapmans as the North and South Shields Bank. After this date he is often alternatively described as a banker.12

 

signature of Robert SpenceIn August, October and December 1818, in July and September 1819, in January, March, June, September and November 1820, in May, August and November 1821, in January and March 1822, and in February 1823 he was a Shields representative to Monthly Meeting. He represented Newcastle Monthly Meeting at Quarterly Meeting in June 1819, June 1820 and June 1822. In January 1820 he was reappointed as Clerk to Newcastle Monthly Meeting, with Jonathan Priestman as his assistant.13

 

By 1821 he had already received a share in the estate of Robert Foster, in the latter's lifetime. In April 1822 he was described as a banker and merchant.14

 

In May 1823 he went to London, to present an anti-slavery petition to the House of Commons. By June 1823 he was no longer Clerk to Newcastle Monthly Meeting, but he represented Shields there that month and December 1823, as well as in July and September 1824, in March, April, July, September, and November 1825, in February, May and November 1826, and in January, March, May, August, October and December 1827. He acted as clerk at the May and September 1825, February 1826, and October 1827 meetings. In November 1824 he was executor of the well of Thomas Kettlewell, ship-owner of North Shields. In February 1826 he received a letter from Isaac Crewdson, requesting a banking apprenticeship for his nephew. Over April/May 1827 he spent a week in Scotland. In August that year he acted as co-executor of the will of his father-in-law Robert Foster; he himself was left £1,200, but from this had to pay an annuity of £40 to Margaret Foster. That year his business appeared in the local directory as "Robert Spence & Co., linen & woollen drapers, Howard street, North Shields." In January 1828 he was appointed an overseer by Newcastle Monthly Meeting. He was one of the two Newcastle representatives to Monthly Meeting in March, July and October 1828, and one of four representing Newcastle at Quarterly Meeting in Darlington that June. In October, described as a draper of Newcastle, he was listed as one of the trustees of the meeting house and burial ground. He was regularly subject to seizures for non-payment of church rates—for example, a distress warrant was issued against him for £1.3s.4d, on the 30th December 1828. He attended Monthly Meeting in February, May, July, September, and December 1829, in February, June, September (twice), and December 1830. In February 1829 it was reported the he had subscribed £21 towards the Master Mariner' Asylum at North Shields. By August 1829 he was Treasurer of the North and South Shields Ferry Company. In March 1830 he was one of three men appointed to enquire into Edward Richardson’s clearness to marry. That month, too, he chaired a meeting at the Northumberland Arms, regarding the establishment of a Customs House at North Shields; he was appointed to the deputation to London. On the 17th May 1830 he had an interview with the duke of Wellington, in North Shields. He attended Monthly Meeting in February, October, and December 1831. On New Year’s Eve of 1831 he petitioned the trustees of Lord Crewe’s Charity, as secretary to the Committee for relief of the indigent, North Shields. He represented Newcastle at Monthly Meeting in April, August, October and December 1832, in January, June, August, and October 1833, and in February, May, July, August, and December 1834. In August 1834 he spent a week touring Scotland, including a visit to General Meeting for Scotland at Edinburgh.15

 

With Myles Foster, he bought the goodwill of ‘the Raff’, an old timber business, for £600; they were partners as "Spence & Foster, Raff Merchants"; they kept a yard for water-seasoning floating timber, near Milburn Place, North Shields. But in May 1829 he and Foster advertised that they had declined the business of raff-merchants and canvas agents at North & South Shields. In November 1830 he chaired a meeting of the inhabitants of North Shields at Ward’s, Commercial Hotel, Howard Street, to consider setting up a subscription for the wives and families of seamen shipwrecked, or returned in unsuccessful ships from Greenland, belonging to the port of Newcastle; he became a committee member, and subscribed £2. In February 1831 a public meeting set up the Society for the Relief of Widows and Orphans of Shipwrecked Mariners; Robert was one of three trustees and a committee member; he donated £5 and gave an annual subscription of £1. In October 1831 he was a freeholder signatory to an open letter to the High Sheriff of Northumberland, requesting a meeting to discuss the Reform Bill. In December 1831 he was appointed Treasurer to the Tynemouth soup kitchen. In November 1832 he was the seventh person to take out life assurance with the Friends' Provident: £500 cover, at a premium of £19 5s. 10d. a year.16

 

The Spence household kept three servants; one, who was with them from about 1833 to 1840, was an escaped slave from Virginia.17

 

In July 1835 Robert chaired a meeting of the North Shields Auxiliary Bible Society, in the Baptist chapel. In January 1836 he was one of those desiring a meeting for opposing the Newcastle to North Shields railway being for passengers only, not coal, as was the local staple.18

 

By September 1836 Robert was recorded as a member of the Board of Guardians for the Tynemouth Union.19

 

Robert was present at Monthly Meeting in February, May, September, and November 1835, in March 1836, in April, June, July, and December 1837. At the July 1837 Monthly Meeting he was given responsibility for burial notes and birth statements for Shields. In June, September, and December 1837, with Mary, he represented Newcastle at the Monthly Meeting of Ministers and Elders; both were Elders, and both continued to attend these meetings every three months until December 1841. Robert was one of the two Shields representatives to Monthly Meeting in May, August, and September 1839, in August and October 1840, and in February and December 1841. In June 1839 and February 1841 he was one of the four Monthly Meeting representatives to Quarterly Meeting. In December 1840 he signed the testimony to Margaret Bragg, at the Monthly Meeting in Newcastle. In March 1842 he was one of the two representatives to Monthly Meeting of Ministers and Elders, at Sunderland; Mary joined him in this capacity for the next four meetings (held quarterly), and for the last two meetings of 1843, though he had a different companion in June that year; Robert attended all but the first meeting of 1844, accompanied in September by Mary; both attended the June 1845 meeting, which proved to be Robert’s last.20

 

He was chairman of the directors of the North and South Shields Fire Assurance Association from 1825 to its dissolution in 1837, and was presented with "an elegant piece of Plate" in recognition of his service.21

 

In 1838 the banking business amalgamated with a Sunderland bank as the Newcastle, Shields and Sunderland Union Joint Stock Banking Company. The goodwill of Chapmans was sold for £20,000. The North Shields branch continued to work almost independently, with Robert Spence as manager until 1845. The bank's address in 1847 (presumably as it was in Robert's lifetime) was 10 Howard Street, North Shields. It was in 1847 that the bank failed, its business being picked up by Woods & Co., and later absorbed into Barclay's.22

 

daguerreotype of Robert SpenceIn January 1838 he chaired a meeting of the Indigent Sick Society. By March he was on the provisional committee of the Tyne Dock Company. In November he chaired the monthly meeting of the Tynemouth Natural History Society. By January 1839 he was a trustee of the Master Mariner's Asylum. In early July 1839 he chaired a public meeting in the Library Room, Howard Street, which set up a subscription for relief to the families of the victims of the "disastrous calamity" at Hilda Wallsend Colliery; he subscribed £5.0.0. In 1840 he became an annual subscriber of £1 1s. to the Royal Victoria Asylum for the Blind. On the 20th January 1841 Robert Spence, banker of North Shields, made his will, with provision for his wife, and a trust for his children during their minority:23

 

I Robert Spence of North Shields in the County of Northumberland Banker do make this my last Will & Testament as follows, that is to say, I give devise and bequeath to my beloved Wife Mary Spence and to my Sons Robert Spence, John Foster Spence and Joseph Spence all of North Shields aforesaid & to their Heirs and Assigns for ever All my real estate of what nature or kind soever the same may be and wheresoever the same may be situated In special trust and confidence that they or the Survivors or Survivor of them their Heirs or Assigns shall or may in their discretion Sell and convey in such manner as they may judge most for the advantage of the trust hereby reposed in them And also give acquittances for the same and apply the Monies arising by sale thereof in the manner hereinafter directed I also Give and bequeath to my said dear Wife Mary Spence and my said Sons Robert Spence, John Foster Spence and Joseph Spence All my personal estate and effects of whatsoever nature kind and description the same may be in the like special trust and confidence in the first place to pay all my just debts funeral and testamentary expences in proving and establishing this my Will In the next place I direct that my said dear wife shall reserve for her sole use and benefit such Furniture or other personal effects as she shall incline to select to the value of One thousand pounds together with all my Books and Papers that she may incline to have—And all the rest and residue of the monies arising from the sale of my real and personal estate of whatsoever nature or kind the same may be I direct my said Trustees as aforesaid to divide share and share alike amongst all my beloved children on their respectively attaining the age of Twenty one years And it is further my Will And I hereby direct that before they receive their said distributive equal shares they shall respectively give their Bond or other Legal Security to my said Trustees before named for the payment to my Dear Wife of Five pounds per cent per annum on their said several shares so long as she shall live in order to enable her to Maintain and Educate my dear children during their minority And in case of her decease before all my dear children shall have attained their Twenty first year it is my Will And I hereby direct that my other three Trustees shall receive the interests and apply the same towards the Education and Maintenance of my dear Children until they respectively attain the age of twenty one years after which if there should be any accumulation or surplus I direct my said Trustees or the Survivors or Survivor of them to divide such surplus in equal portions amongst all my dear children in case my dear Wife should not be living at the time my younger Child should have attained her twenty first year On the contrary if she should be alive whatever accumulation may have taken place I direct shall be at her own disposal And I hereby Nominate and appoint my said dear Wife and my said Sons Robert Spence, John Foster Spence and Joseph Spence the Executors of this my last Will & Testament Revoking any other Will I may have heretofore made In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my Hand and Seal to this my Last Will and Testament contained in this sheet of paper this Twentieth day of the first month called January one thousand eight hundred and forty one. Robert Spence. (S.S.)

[Witnesses: Robert Foster, Henry Shewell Corder, Henry Wigham]

 

At the time of the 1841 census he was recorded as living with his wife and family in Howard Street, Tynemouth, with two nephews and five servants. Robert Spence was first treasurer under the Shields Town Improvement Act, and was Borough Treasurer for Tynemouth after the incorporation; in this capacity he had to pay the town watchmen. Around this time, or a bit earlier, there was only one old constable in North Shields, and anyone arrested was put in the lockup, of which Spence as Borough Treasurer kept the keys. "It was generally a case of drunk and disorderly on Saturday, and on Sunday after meeting R. Spence and his sons used to go and unlock and consider the case. It generally ended in "Now go home to thy wife and don't ever do this again." He was also in charge of the town fire engine. He was a manager of the Jubilee and Kettlewell schools. He was an advocate of gas lighting for North Shields. By May 1843 he was one of the two trustees of the Seamen's Loyal Standard Association. In September 1844, as one of the Commissioners of an Act for Paving, Lighting, Watching, Cleansing, Regulating, and Improving the Town of North Shields, he was among the signatories to an open letter calling for a public meeting to discuss the laying of gas pipes and the avoidance of contamination to the water supply by gas.24

 

He absolutely forbade singing in his house, and strongly disapproved of 'theatre'.25

 

He kept a journal, which was privately printed by Philip Spence in 1939.26

 

He was one of the most respected residents in his adopted town, ably filling many of its public offices. His presence, rendered conspicuous by his height, his long white hair, and the somewhat dignified gait enjoined by the Quakerism of that day, was long remembered by some of the older inhabitants of the harbour towns. He was a man of considerable literary taste and culture, and the valuable collections of books and manuscripts which were made by his son owed their origin to him. Among them is the original manuscript of the Journal of George Fox.27

 

His kindness extended itself to all around him in a remarkable degree, but the privations of the poor especially excited his warm sympathy, and he was much occupied not only in giving them personal relief but also in devising and assisting various benevolent associations for the amelioration of their condition. The regard which was born for him was shown by the general closing of the shops on the day of his funeral.28

 

On the 2nd August 1845 he made a codicil to his will, amending provision for his wife and children:29

 

This is a Codicil to the above written Will and Testament of me Robert Spence of North Shields in the County of Northumberland Banker Whereas since the date of the said Will my dear Daughter Rachel the wife of Henry Shewell Corder of Ipswich has been removed by death leaving a Son named Thomas I do hereby direct that the Trustees appointed by my said Will shall stand possessed of the share of my real and personal estate and effects to which my dear daughter would have been entitled if she had survived me In trust to pay the Interest thereof for the Maintenance and Education of my said Grandson Thomas Corder until he shall attain the age of twenty one years and Upon trust so soon as he attains that age to pay over to him the share of his dear Mother in my Estate and Effects for his own absolute use and benefit And my Will is that if my said Grandson shall depart this Life before he attains the age of twenty one years then that the share shall be In trust for my dear Son in law Henry Shewell Corder and his Heirs for his own absolute use and benefit And I hereby revoke such part of my said Will as relates to my Children before they receive their distributive equal shares giving their Bonds for the payment of interest thereon to my beloved Wife and instead thereof I direct that my said Trustees shall in the first place secure out of my real and personal estate and effects the payment to my believed Wife of the sum of Eight hundred pounds yearly and every year for and during the term of her Natural life the said payment to be made to her by two equal half yearly payments in each year And my Mind and Will is that the share or shares of such Children as are daughters to be paid to them to their sole and separate use and shall be at their own disposal and shall not be in any manner under the control or interference or subject to the debts or engagements of their respective Husbands And I direct that the receipts of my said daughters shall be full and sufficient releases to my said Trustees for any money payable to them under my said Will And I hereby also direct that the receipt or receipts of my said Trustees for any money payable to them under my said Will or in any way connected therewith shall be full and effectual releases and discharges for the sum or sums of Money therein respectively expressed to be received and that no purchaser or other person paying them any money sum or sums of Money shall be bound or obliged to enquire into the necessity of any such Sale or the application of the said monies nor be answerable for the misapplication or nonapplication thereof And I hereby appoint my said dear Wife and my sons Robert Spence, John Foster Spence and Joseph Spence Trustees of my said Will and Codicil And I hereby confirm my said Will in all respects except as the same is altered by this Codicil In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my Hand this Second day of the eighth Month called August in the year one thousand eight hundred and forty five.  Robert Spence.

[Witnesses: Frederic Corder, Robert Corder]

After an attack of dizziness and a severe fall, and having been twice bled, he died at 7:30 pm on the 17th August 1845, in Howard Street, Tynemouth. He was buried on the 22nd at Stephenson Street, North Shields:30

 

The remains of the late Robert Spence, Esq., of North Shields, were accompanied to the place of interment attached to the chapel belonging the Society of Friends, in Stephenson-street, by a number of the principal tradesmen in North Shields, on Friday last, with a large number of the private friends of deceased. Nearly all the shops in the leading streets were closed, and generally throughout the town of Shields a very strong feeling of respect was shown to the memory of a really good man, one who was ever ready to lend a hand of assistance to the poor and needy.

His will was proved at Durham on the 9th October 1845, and in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury on the 8th August 1848. His estate was sworn under £25,000 (£1,102,500 at 2005 values).31

 

On the occasion of his death the bank directors recorded the following minute:

 

In reference to the death of Robert Spence, Esq., which took place on the 17th August last, the directors are at a loss how to enter any Minute expressive of their feelings of respect and attachment to his honoured memory, in common with all who knew him. They desire to record their admiration of his character in his unblemished integrity, in his devoted attention to the duties of his office, and in the courtesies and sympathies of life by which he was ornamented, and which caused him to be greatly beloved.32

In October 1845 the Newcastle Courant reported that

 

A finely executed bust of the late Mr Robert Spence, of North Shields, has just been finished by Mr James Shotton, a young and rising artist of that town. The character and expression of the face resemble the late respected gentleman very much indeed. The bust has been executed from a small Daguerreotype portrait of Mr Spence, and, therefore, the credit of a successful likeness in this case adds an additional lustre to the genius of the artist. Mr Shotton has promised to place the bust in one of the public buildings in the town.33

The present whereabouts of this bust have so far proved untraceable.

 

Robert Spence was the eldest child of [N3] Robert and [N49] Sarah Spence.34

 

 

1 TNA: RG 6/789, /1571; Philip Spence (1939) Robert and Mary Spence; my own knowledge

2 Journal of Robert Spence

3 Journal of Robert Spence; Ackworth School Centenary Committee (1879) List of the Boys and Girls admitted into Ackworth School 1779–1879, Ackworth

4–5 Journal of Robert Spence

6 Spence (1939); Ernest de Selincourt, ed. (1967–82): The Letters of William and Dorothy Wordsworth, 2nd edn, Oxford)

7 Journal of Robert Spence; TNA: RG 6/710, RG 6/1562; minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting, TWAS MF 167 & 168; Tyne Mercury; Northumberland and Durham and Cumberland Gazette, 1808-12-27

8 blurb on eBay advertising letter for sale, accessed 2006-09-22; minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting, Tyne & Wear Archives Service MF 168; Spence, op. cit., TNA: RG 6/710, RG 6/1562; Myles B. Foster (1860): Ms Memoir of Robert Foster

9 Robert Spence letters in possession of Peter Robson; RG 6/628, /775, /1149

10 Minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting, TWAS MF 168; Spence (1939)

11 Minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting, TWAS MF 168 & 169

12 Journal of Robert Spence; Death Duty Registers, (IR26&27)/1125; death certificate; (IR 26&27)/1722; wife's death certificate; children's entries in marriage digest; sons’ marriage certificates

13 Minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting, TWAS MF 169

14 Durham Probate Records DPRI/1/1827/F9; Durham County Advertiser, 1822-04-06

15 (IR 26&27)/1125; Newcastle Courant, 1829-02-21; Durham Chronicle, 1830-03-27

16 Minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting, TWAS MF 169; Journal of Robert Spence; Durham Probate Records (Robert Foster, 1827); History, Directory and Gazetteer of Durham and Northumberland; petition in Northumberland Record Office, catalogued in www.a2a.org.uk; The Newcastle Courant, 1824-11-20, issue 7728, 1829-02-21, issue 8040, 1829-08-15, issue 8064

17 Spence (1939)

18 The Newcastle Courant, 1835-07-18, issue 8373, 1836-01-23, issue 8410

19 TNA MH 12/0156/40 and MH 12/9156/30

20 Minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting, TWAS MF 169; minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting of Ministers & Elders, TWAS MF 180; Robert Spence letters to Robert Foster, in my possession

21 Newcastle Journal, 1837-04-15

22 Spence (1939); White's Newcastle & Gateshead Directory, 1847; Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson

23 The Newcastle Courant, 1838-01-26, issue 8515, 1838-03-02, issue 8520, 1838-11-16, issue 8557, 1839-07-05, issue 8590; Northern Liberator, issue 91, 1839-07-13; will, TNA TNA: PROB 11/2080; Durham Probate Records, copy will, DPRI/2/53 pp563-565; TNA: HO 107/826/3 f8 p8; Spence (1939); Newcastle Journal, 1840-06-20; Newcastle Journal, 1839-01-26

24 TNA: HO 107/826/3 f5 p8; Spence (1939); Myles B. Foster (1860) Ms Memoir of Robert Foster; The Newcastle Courant, 1829-05-23, issue 8053, 1830-11-27, issue 8131, 1830-12-25, issue 8135, 1831-03-19 & 1831-04-02, issues 8147 & 8149, 1831-10-08, issue 8176, 1831-12-24, issue 8187; Bootham 1.3:236; David Tregoning & Hugh Cockerell (1982) Friends for Life. Friends' Provident Life Office 1932~1982. London: Henry Melland: 22; Newcastle Journal, 1844-09-21; Newcastle Journal, 1843-05-27

25–26 Spence (1939)

27 Welford (1875) Men of Mark 'twixt Tyne and Tweed. London: Walter Scott, III:426

28 obituary in The Friend q. in Spence (1939); Newcastle Journal, 1845-08-30

29 Will, TNA PROB 11/2080; Durham Probate Records, copy will, DPRI/2/53 pp563-565

30 Newcastle Courant, 1845-08-22; Newcastle Courant, 1845-08-29; Newcastle Journal, 1845-08-30

31 Spence (1939); death certificate; (IR 26&27)/1722; death/burial digest; PROB 11/1280; Durham Probate Records, copy will, DPRI/2/53 pp563-565

32 Maberly Phillips: A history of banks, bankers, & banking in Northumberland, Durham, and North Yorkshire, illustrating the commercial development of the north of England, from 1755 to 1894, with numerous portraits, facsimiles of notes, signatures, documents, &c

33 Newcastle Courant, 1845-10-17; according to the Newcastle Courant of 1846-01-02 the bust had been placed in the New Town Hall, North Shields

34 RG 6/790, /792, /1164, /1571



N3. ROBERT SPENCE

Robert Spence was born on the 6th August 1742, at Darley, Hampsthwaite, Yorkshire. He was brought up a Friend.1

 

He married, first, Deborah Hardcastle (1746–1779, d. of Jonathan and Hannah (Davie) Hardcastle), at Dacre in Netherdale, on the 1st December 1774. They had two children: John (1775–1851) and Hannah (1777–1798).2

 

In 1779 he inherited his father's copyhold estate, except for the cross building, as well as half the residue of the estate; he was co-executor of his father's will with his brother John. In August that year he gave dinner to Joseph Wood, at Hardcastle-Garth; Wood noted that "our friend Jane Burrow having had for sometime a concern on her mind to pay a religious visit to the Inhabitants of Boroughbridge we set out for that place 15 miles about 5 o Clock and the weather being extremely hot our friend Robert Spence would not suffer us to walk but furnished us that were on foot with horses and desired us to keep them as long as we had occasion for them which was very kind of him for we could not have reacht the place that night on our feet;" . . . .3

 

In the 1783 Land Tax records he was assessed for £1 10s. 5Όd. as occupier of a property in Hartwith cum Winsley owned by Jonathan Hardcastle, and for £1 4s. as occupier of another there owned by William Cook.4

 

He married as his second wife [N49] Sarah Walker, at Gildersome, Yorkshire, on the 30th April 1783; he was at that date a butcher, of Hartwith, Kirby Malzard, Yorkshire—which he remained till his death (in 1795, 1797 and 1810 he was described as a yeoman). They had six children: [N2] Robert (1784–1845), Thomas (1785–1788), Abraham (1786–1788), Thomas (1788–1849), Rachel (1790–1856), and Sarah (1792–1863).5

 

He made his will on 22 June 1793, with codicils on 30 July6:

 

This is the last Will and Testament of me Robert Spence of Hartwith in the Parish of Kirkby malzeard and County of York Butcher as follows I Give and dsvise All that Estate of Lands and Buildings which I purchased of Miles Solley consting of half of one Messuage and three Closes or Parcels of Land commonly called Bridge Field, Back Close and Pasture Close, Also an Allotment or Parcel of Land adjoining upon the said Premises set out and awarded by the Commissioners for dividing and inclosing Knaresbrough Forest containing one Acre and three Roods or thereabouts Statute Measure Also another Allotment or Parcel of Land set out by the said Commissioners which I purchased of Stephen Gill (with a Cellar therein) containing one Rood or thereabouts in Statute Measure, And also all that one Messuage or Dwellinghouse wherein Thomas Waller now dwells with all the Lands and Buildings thereto belonging (which I purchased of William Cook) containing by Estimation four Acres and an half be the same more or less, And also an Allotment or Parcel of Land thereto adjoining containing two Roods and two Perches or thereabouts Statute Measure, And also one other Allotment or Parcel of Land situate in Menwith Hill near Stone Beds containing five Acres one Rood and eleven Perces or thereabouts Statute Measure All which said Premises are situate within the Township or Constablery of Menwith with Darley in the Forest of Knaresbrough and are now in the occupation of Robert Walker and the said Thomas Waller their Undertenants or Assigns, I say, I give and devise all the before mentioned Lands and Premises with all Barnes Buildings Garths Gardens Hereditaments and Appurtenances to the same belonging to my Brother John Spence his Heirs and Assigns. Upon the Trusts nevertheless and to and for the Uses intents and purposes hereinafter mentioned expressed and declared of and concerning the same, that is to say, That ^he the said ^John Spence or his Heirs shall borrow and take up at Interest the Sum of one hundred Pounds and shall Mortgage all or any Part of the said aforesaid Lands and Premises for the Security thereof to such Person or Persons as shall advance the same his her or their Heirs and Assigns and within twelve Calendar Months next after my decease shall pay the said Sum of one hundred Pounds so borrowed to my Wife Sarah Spence which said Sum of one hundred Pounds I give to her my said Wife in lieu and full satisfaction for her Dower or Thirds out of all my Lands and Premises whatsoever and the Receipt and Receipts of my said Trustee or his Heirs shall be a sufficient discharge to the Mortgage or Mortgagees for the aforesaid Money notwithstanding any misapplication or nonapplication thereof Also upon Trust that he my said Trustee or his Heirs shall let all my ^said Lands and Grounds Premises and by and out of the Rents Issues and Profits thereof shall pay the Interest shall pay the Interest of the said Sum of one hundred Pounds so borrowed and after deducting all reasonable Expences and Charges sustained and expended by reason of this Trust shall pay the Remainder of the Rents Issues and Profits thereof to my said ^Wife or such Person or Persons as shall or may be Guardian or Guardians for my said Son Thomas Spence and my Daughter Sarah Spence to be applied by her my said Wife or such Guardian or Guardians for and towards the Use maintenance education and support of my said Son Thomas and my said Daughter Sarah until my said Son Thomas shall attain the age of twenty one years and so soon as he my said Son Thomas shall attain the age of twenty one years that he my said Trustee John Spence or his Heirs shall Surrender Convey and Assure all the aforesaid Lands Buildings and Premises with all Hereditaments and Appurtenances thereto belonging unto and to the Use of my said Son Thomas Spence his Heirs and Assigns for ever Subject to the Payment of the said Sum of one hundred Pounds for which the same shall then stand Mortgaged for the purpose aforesaid And also subject to and I do hereby charge all the same Premises with the payment of the Sum of Two hundred Pounds which I give to my said Daughter Sarah to be paid to her when she shall attain the age of twenty one years And also subject to and I do hereby charge all the same Premises with the Payment of the yearly Sum of Eight Pounds to be paid to my said Wife and Brother John Spence or such Person or Persons as shall or may be Guardian or Guardians for my said Daughter Sarah Yearly and every year from the Time that my said Son Thomas shall shall or might have attained the Age of twenty one years to the Time my said Daughter Sarah shall attain the age of twenty one years or dece die which shall first happen by two even and equal Payments in each year the first Payment thereof to become due at the end of six Calendar Months next after he my said Son Thomas shall or might have attained that Age to be applied by my said Wife and Brother John or such Guardian or Guardians for and towards the Use maintenance and education of my said Daughter Sarah and until she shall attain the Age of twenty one Years, And in Case of default for thirty Days of Payment of the said Annuity or Rent Charge or any Part thereof after the same shall be payable I give power to my said Wife and Brother or such Guardian or Guardians from Time to Time to enter upon all or any part of said house Premises charged therewith and distrain for the same and the distress and [illeg.] distresses so tkaen to impound and sell as in cases of distress for nonpayment of Rent in Arrears, but in case my said Son Thomas shall happen to die before he shall attain the Age of twenty one Years and leave no lawful Issue, Then and in that Case Upon further Trust that he my said Trustee John Spence or his Heirs shall Surrender Conveyance assure all the aforesaid Lands Buildings and Premises with the Appurtenances unto and to the Use of my Children Robert Spence Rachel Spence and said Sarah Spence equally their several and respective Heirs and Assigns forever as Tenants in Common, Subject to all the Incumbrances before mentioned I Give and devise All that Messuage or Dwellinghouse wherein the said Robert Walker now dwells one Barn and three Closes of Land thereto belonging containing by estimation four Acreas and one Rood be the same more or less (being late the Estimate Estate of my Father Joseph Spence deceased), Also an Allotment or Parcel of Land set out by the said Commissioners situate on Darley Carr containing three Acres two Roods and eleven Perches or thereabouts, Statute Measure, All which said Premises are situate in Darley in the Parish of Hampsthwaite and are now in the Occupation of the said Robert Walker his Undertenants or Assigns with all other Buildings Garths Gardens Hereditaments and Appurtenances to all the said Premises belonging unto my said Son Robert Spence his Heirs and Assigns fore ever, Subject to and I do hereby charge all the same Premises hereinbefore devised to my said Son Robert with the Payment of the Sum of two Hundred Pounds which I give to my said Daughter Rachel to be paid to her when she shall attain the age of twenty one years. And also with the clear Yearly Sum of Eight Pounds (being interest for the said Sum of Two Hundred Pounds payable to my said Daughter Rachel as aforesaid) from ^the Time of my decease to the Time my said Daughter Rachel shall attain the age of twenty one years or die which shall first happen to be paid by two even and equal Payments in each year to such Person or Persons as shall or may be Guardian or Guardians for my said Daughter Rachel to be applied by such Guardian or Guardians for and towards the Use maintenance and education of my said Daughter Rachel until she shall attain the Age of twenty one years. I Give and devise one Beast Gate or Cattle Gate on Dacre Pasture with the Appurtenances to my said Son Robert Spence his Heirs Executors Administrators and Assigns according the the nature and Tenure thereof and according to my Estate and Interest therein And Whereas my said Son Robert Spence is now under the Age of twenty one years I nominate and appoint my said Wife and my said Brother John Spence Trustees to hold the said Estates and Beast Gate for him my said Son Robert during his Minority, And I do empower them my said Trustees to let the same and recieve the Rents Issues and Profits thereof until my said Son Robert shall attain the Age of twenty one years and after applying the said yearly Sum of Eight Pounds part thereof for and towards the Maintenance and Education of my said Daughter Rachel as aforesaid And after deducting reasonable Expences sustained in expended by reason of this Trust shall apply the remainder of the Rents and Profits thereof for and towards the maintenance and Education of my said son Robert until he shall atain the Age of twenty one years, And after the [illeg.] determination of this Trust in Case of default for thirty Days of Payment of the said Annuity of Eight Pounds or any Part thereof payable for the maintenance and education of my said Daughter Rachel as aforesaid after the same shall be payable I give power to my said Wife and Brother John Spence or such Person or Persons as shall or may be Guardian or Guardians for my said Daughter ^Rachel from Time to Time to enter upon all or any part of said Premises charged therewith and distrain for the same and the Distress and Distresses so taken to impound and sell as in Cases of Distress for nonpayment of Rent in Arrears But in Case any of them my said Children Robert, Thomas, Rachel and Sarah shall die before he she or they shall respectively attain the Age of twenty one years and leave no lawful issue in that Case I give and devise the Estate or Estates Legacy or Legacies hereinbefore given or devised to him her or them so dying to the Survivors ^or Survivor of them my said Children Robert Thomas Rachel and Sarah their several and respective Heirs and Executors Administrators and Assigns as Tenants in common and not as joint Tenants. I Give to my said Son John Spence the Sum of ten Pounds, and I give to my Daughter Hannah Spence the Sum of five Pounds to be paid to each of them when they shall respectively attain the Age of twenty one years. I Give and bequeath all the rest residue and remainder of my Goods and Chattels ready Money and Securities for Money Book Debts and all other my Personal Exp Effects whatsoever (not herein otherwise disposed of) to my said Wife Sarah Spence her Executors Administrators and Assigns. Subject to the Payment of all my just Debts Funeral Expences and Probate of tis my Will and I do nomitate [sic] and appoint my said Wife and said Brother John Spence Guardians for my said Children until they shall respectively attain the Age of twenty one years or be married Lastly I do make constitute and appoint my said Wife and my said Brother John Spence joint Executors of this my last Will and Testament and I do hereby revoke all former Wills by me heretofore made

In Witness whereof I the said Testator John Robert Spence have to this my last Will and Testament written on three Sheets of Paper set my Hand to the first and second Sheet thereof and my Hand and Seal to the third or last Sheet thereof this twenty second day of June in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety three Robert Spence (LS) Signed Sealed publised [sic] and declared by the said Testator Robert Spence as and ^or for his last Will and Testament in our sight and Presence and by us subscribed as Witnesses in the sight and presence in the sight and presence of each other, These Words "which I give to my said Daughter Sarah" being first interlined in the second sheet hereof and other Interlineations being first made. Wm Snow. Edward Bilton Mary Stead.

This is a Codicil to be annexed to and taken as part of the last Will and Testament of me Robert Spence of Hartwith in the Parish of Kirkby malzeard and County of York Butcher. Whereas in and by my said Will which bears Date the tweny twenty second Day of June in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety three I have given and devised certain Lands and Premises situate in the Township or Constablery or Menwith with Darley to my Brother John Spence his Heirs and Assigns, Upon trust to borrow the sum of one hundred Pounds to be paid to my Wife and Mortgage all or any Part thereof said Lands and Premises for the Security thereof, and for other purposes therein mentioned And Whereas in and by my said Will I have given the Sum of ten Pounds to my son John and five Pounds to my Daughter Hannah payable by my Executors out of my Personal Estate Therefore in Case my Personal Estate be defective deficient in Paying and discharging all my Debts the said Legacies to said Children John and Hannah and the the Expences of my Funeral and Probate of my Will, Then upon Trust that my sad said Brother John or his Heirs shall borrow and take up at Interest such further Sum or Sums of Money as Shall be further wantnging for the discharge and payment of the remainder of my Debts Legacies to my said Children John and Hannah and the Expences of my Funeral and Probate of my Will and therewith shall fully pay and discharge the same And shall further Mortgage all or any Part of the said Lands and Premises in my said Will so devised to him my said Brother John and his Heirs to such Person or Persons as shall advance the same his or their Heirs and Assigns and the Receipt or Receipts of my said Brother John or his Heirs shall be a sufficient discharge to the Mortgagee or Mortgagees so as they shall not be liable to see to the Application of the Mortgage Money In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my Hand and Seal this Thirtieth Day of July in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety three Robert Spence Signed Sealed published and declared by the said Robert Spence as and for a Codicil to his last Will and Testament in the presence of us who at his request in his presence and in the presence of each other have subscribed our Names as Witnesses Wm Snow Edward Bilton Mary Stead.

This is another Codicil to be annexed to and taken as part of the last Will and [Testament] of me Robert Spence of Hartwith in the Parish of Kirkby malzeard Butcher Whereas in and by my said Will which bears Date the twenty second Day of June in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety three I have given and dvised certain Lands and Premises situate in Darley in the Parish of Hampthwaite to my Son Robert Spence his Heirs and Assigns for ever Subject to and charged with such Incumbrances as are therein mentioned Now I do hereby further charge all the said Lands and Premises so devised in and by my said Will to my said Son Robert his Heirs and Assigns with the payment of the sum of one hundred and twenty five Pounds which I give to my Wife Sarah Spence to be paid to her when my said Son Robert should attain the Age of twenty one years or in Case of his Death before that Time to be paid to her so soon as some other Person or Persons shall hold the said Lands and Premises and be of the Age of twenty one Years And I also charge the same Premises with the Payment of Interest yearly to my said Wife after the Rate of four Pounds for ^one hundred Pounds for a year for the said Sum of one hundred and twenty five Pounds from the Time of my decease to the Time that the said principal Sum shall be paid, the first Payment of said Interest or yearly Rent charge to become due at the end of twelve Calendar Months next after my decease. And in default of payment for thirty Days of the said Interest or yearly Rent charge or any Part thereof after the same shall be payable I give power to my said Wife or her Assigns from Time to Time to enter upon the said Premises charged therewith or any Part thereof and distrain for the same and the Distress and Distresses so taken to impound and sell as in Cases of Distress for Nonpayment of Rent in Arrear And Whereas in and by my said Will I have give[n] and devised certain Lands and Premises situate in the Township or Constablery of Menwith with Darley to my Brother John Spence his Heirs and Assigns Upon Trust to borrow the sum of one hundred Pounds to be paid to my said Wife and Mortgage all or any Part of said Lands and Premises for the security thereof Now my Will is that my said Brother John Spence or his Heirs shall borrow and take up at Interest the further Sum of twenty five pounds and shall Mortgage all or any part of said Lands and Premises so devised to him for the Security thereof to such Person or Persons as shall advance the same his her or their Heirs and Assigns and shall pay the same to my said Wife in sure such Manner and at such Time as the said Sum of one hundred Pounds is in and by my said Will directed to be paid. And the Receipt or Receipts of my said Brother John or his Heirs shall be a sufficient discharge to the Mortgagee or Mortgagees so as they shall not be liable to see to the application of the Mortgage Money. And the Interest thereof shall be paid in the same manner as the Interest of the said Sum of one hundred Pounds so directed to be borrowed is in my said Will directed to be paid In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my Hand and Seal this thirtieth Day of July in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety three Robert (LS) Spence Signed Sealed published and declared by the said Robert Spence as and for a Codicil to his last Will and Testament in the presence of us who at his request in his presence and in the presence of each other have subscribed our Names as Witnesses. Wm Snow, Edward Bilton, Mary Stead

According to his son,

 

My father was of a remarkably generous disposition & this used sometimes to lead him into errors for it is possible to have failings "which may lean to virtues side" and my father's open free and easy manners was a disadvantage to him and the means of leading him more into company than was profitable; before or about my 10th year he had an apoplectic fit, by which he lost the use of nearly the whole of one side, and the medical man who attended him advised his going to Harrogate, I accompanied him & my mother and was left behind along with my father, to assist and take care of him, I used to fetch him the water from the wells in the morng. &c. &c. his health rapidly declined, and it was concluded best for us to return home, the journey altho only about 9 miles was accomplished with difficulty and my father got gradually worse & I believe a second attack disabled him almost entirely & on             [sic] he was removed from this scene of afflictive tribulation, I stood by my mother at the bedside weeping when the solemn hour arrived which ranked her amongst the mournful list of widows & placed me amongst the tribe of the fatherless.7

He died on the 9th September 1793, after two apoplectic fits. His body was buried at Hardcastle Garth on the 12th.8

 

Robert Spence was the eldest surviving child of [N4] Joseph and [N26] Grace Spence.9

 

1 TNA: RG 6/1091, /901, /1165, /1571; Philip Spence (1939) Robert and Mary Spence

2 TNA: RG 6/1091, /1571; Spence (1939)

3 father's will; DQB; Joseph Wood notebooks; Leeds Intelligencer, 1779-03-09

4 West Yorkshire Land Tax records

5 DQB; TNA: RG 6/527, /785, /1562, harrogatepeopleandplaces.info/wills/v/080.htm (accessed 2006-01-10); Spence (1939)

6 copy will

7 Journal of Robert Spence

8 RG 6/902, /1165; Spence (1939)

9 RG 6/1091, /1571



N4. JOSEPH SPENCE

Joseph Spence was born on the 1st April 1715, at Menwith Hill, Hampsthwaite, Yorkshire.1

 

He married [N26] Grace Bramley on the 10th June 1739, at Dacre; at that date he still lived at Menwith Hill. Their children were: Joseph (1740/1–1752), [N3] Robert (1742–1793), Mary (1744–1751), John (1746–1806), Grace (1749–1801), Abraham (1750/1–1752), Mary (1754–1754), Sarah (1755 – before 1841), and Rachel (1761–1836).2

 

His circumstances as to this world's wealth were during the early part of his life and for a considerable time after his marriage, rather straightened, yet by an unremitting attention to business frugality and industry, he was in the course of a few years enabled, not only to exercise the rights of hospitality to his friends, but to give to his children as their necessities required it, such assistance as set them comfortably forward in life.3

 

In November 1769 Joseph Spence, of Menwith Cum Darley, made his will4:

 

Be it Remembered this Firteenth day of November In the Year 1768 That this is the last Will and Testament of me Joseph Spence of Menwich Cum Darley, who being perfect in mind and memory and mindful of my Mortality Do give and dispose of all my worldly Goods and Estate in the following manner (To wit)

In the first place having past as Surrender to the Use of this my last Will I subject my Copy hold Estate with all my Personal Estate also to pay my just Debts Funeral Expences, and Legacies, as afterwards in this my last Will mentioned and Expressed, and Imprimis I Give to my Dear wife Grace Spence the Yearly Sum of Eighty Pounds to be paid her Yearly and every Year during her natural life by my Executors hereafter mentioned, to wit I appoint that she have four pounds paid her at the half years end after my decease, and the other Four Pounds the half years end after that, and son on four pounds every half Year during the Continuance of her natural life, Also my Will is that my said wife shall enjoy the two Low rooms in the Cross building or Heckling Shop, free from any rent, repairs, or Incumbrances whatsoever, I also give her one new feather bed and bedding with all Materials belonging it, with one Cupboard, the Clock, and a long Table, with some other necessary things she thinks proper to have to furnish her a Room. Item I Give to my Son Robert Spence my Copy hold Estate I now live upon, with all the Appurtenances whatsoever belonging the same, except the Cross building, which Cross building, namely the two upper Rooms and the Heckling shop, I give to my Son John Spence, and at the Decease of my wife Grace Spence, I give him also the two low rooms in the said Cross building, I also Give to my Son John Spence the Sum of Three Hundred Pounds

Item I Give to my Daughter Grace Dowgil, the wife of John Dowgil, The Sum of Two Hundred Pounds, One Hundred Pounds of which I appoint to be paid for twelve Months after my Decease, And the other Hundred Pounds, Twelve Months after that.

Item I Give to my Daughter Sarah Spence the Sum of Two Hundred Pounds, One Hundred Pounds of which two, I appoint to be paid her when she Arrives at the Age of Twenty One Years, and the other when she Arrives to the Age of Twenty Two Years, without any manner of Deduction whatsoever regarding maintenance, clothing, or Education.

Item I Give to my Daughter Rachel Spence the Sum of Two Hundred Pounds, One Hundred of which is to be paid here when she Arrives to the Age of Twenty One Years, and the other Hundred Pounds when she Arrive's at the age of Twenty two Years, without any Deduction whatsoever as her Sister Sarah's, but in Case either of my said Daughters namely Sarah, or Rachel, should die before they Arrive at the Age of Twenty One Years, then I Will, that her fortune shall be Divided share and share like among all my said Children then living, except she should be married and leave a Child or Children, and then her fortune to go to that child or Children equally

Item I Give to my Brother Abraham Spence during the Continuance of his Natural Life the Yearly income of Twenty shillings, to be paid him at five shillings each Quarter by my Executors hereafter named, the first Quarters payment, or Sum of Five shillings, to be paid him Three Months after my Decease, and so on every three Months during the aforesaid continuance of his Natural Life.

As for my other Estate Real and Personal with every thing else whatsoever I have, and call my own, and not before dispos'd of, after my just Debts, Funeral Expences, and Legacies, as before mentioned, are fully paid and discharg'd I give it to my two Sons Robert and John Spence to be Equally Divided between them share and share like; I also Constitute make and Ordain my said Two Sons Robert Spence and John Spence joint Executors of this my last Will & Testament, and I do hereby utterly disallow, revoke and disannul all other former Wills by me made Confirming this and no other, to be my last Will and Testament. In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and Seal the Day & Year above written —

Sign'd, Seal'd Publish'd and Declar'd by the said Joseph Spence as his last Will and Testament in the Presence of us Robt Crosby Wm Metcalfe. Thos Parker

 

In 1774 he was described as a linen weaver of Darley, Hampsthwaite; in 1779 he was said to have been a shopkeeper.5

 

He died on the 4th February 1779, and was buried at Dacre Friends' burying-ground on the 8th.6

 

The executors of his will, in which he is described as a mercer, grocer, linen-draper, and haberdasher, of Darley, were his sons Joseph and Robert. His shops were taken by Robert Walker, who also contracted for the stock in trade.7

 

Joseph Spence was the youngest child of [N5] Joseph and [N25] Sarah Spence.8

 

 

1 Dictionary of Quaker Biography (Friends’ House Library, typescript)—which says birth on 2nd March 1714/15 or 1715/16; TNA: RG 6/1571

2 TNA: RG 6/890, /1091, /1571

3 Philip Spence (1939) Robert and Mary Spence

4 will

5 RG 6/1071

6 RG 6/1091, /1571

7 Leeds Intelligencer, 1779-03-09

8 RG 6/1571; Spence (1939)



N5. JOSEPH SPENCE

Joseph Spence was born on the 13th April 1677, at Hampsthwaite, Yorkshire.1

 

He married, first, [N25] Sarah ____, in 1700. They lived at Menwith Hill, Hampsthwaite. They had seven children: John (1701 – ?), Abraham (1703 – before 1719), Mary (1706–1737), Hannah (1710–1715), Sarah (1710/1 – ?), Rachel (1713 – ?), and [N4] Joseph (1714/5–1779).2

 

He married, secondly, Hannah Hardcastle (1687–1723), in 1717. Their children, born in Yorkshire, were: Peter (1718/9 – ?) and Abraham (1719–1791).3

 

Joseph Spence was the sixth child and second son of [N6] John and [N14] Mary Spence.4

 


1–2 TNA: RG 6/1091

3 TNA: RG 6/1091; Hampsthwaite parish register

4 RG 6/1091



N6. JOHN SPENCE

John Spence was born in 1633 and baptised in Hampsthwaite, Yorkshire, on 7 April that year. He joined the Society of Friends by convincement.1

 

The Knaresborough MM Record of Sufferings records that in 1658, for non-payment of tithes, there was "Taken from John Spence by John Dib for nonpayment of the steeplehouse sess one horse draught worth 00 01 06".2

 

He married [N14] Mary Inman on the 30th December 1660, at Henry Settle's, Harefield, in Netherdale. At that time he lived at Menwith Hill, Hampsthwaite; he was later recorded as living in Darley. Their children were: John (1663 – ?), Mary (1666 – after 1701), Hannah (1668–1684), Sarah (1670 – after 1708), Rachel (1672/3–1699), [N5] Joseph (1677–1752), Abraham (1679–1752), Ruth (1682–1768), and Hannah (1684/5–1768); all were born in Yorkshire.3

 

In 1682 "At a Quarter Sessions held at Wetherby on the 9th and 10th of the Eleventh Month, eighty one Persons, summoned thither by Warrants, appeared, and were told by the Clerk, that they were severally indicted for Absence from their Parish-Churches, and required to traverse their Indictment, which they refusing to do, the Court tendred to them all the Oath of Allegiance, and upon their Refusal to take it, committed them to Prison, namely [ . . . ] John Spence" . . .4

 

He made his will on 24 July 16935:

 

Memorandum the will & mind of John Spence of Menwith hill within the County of Yorke Fellmonger being desireous to setle & dispose of my temporall esstate which god hath blessed me withall in manner & forme as followeth:

Imprimis I give & comend my soule into the hands of almight god my maker and to Jesus Christ my saviour & redeemer in full asureance of my ever lasting hapynes when I have finished my testimony heere in this Life

And as for my temporall esstate I give & bequeath as Followeth—

First I give & bequeath unto John Spence Mary Spence & Sarah Spence my three eldest Children each of them Twelve pence att my decease

Item I give & bequeath unto Mary Spence my now wife three gates or pasturing for three beasts within Dacre pasture & all my personall estate whatsoever moveable & imoveable for & towards the maintinance & bringing up of my Five yongest Children & dispose of amongst my sd Children when she shall think conveinient & if it please god to take Mary my wife out of this transitory life before my youngest Child attaine to the age of Twenty one yeares Itt is my mind to Comitt those goods & Cattell & Chattels mouvable & imouvable into the hands of Geo: Gill & Miles Oddy of Dacre pasture upon speciall trust & Confidence for the uses heerafter expressed & that of the Lands surendered by me untill my yongest Child attaine to the age [abousd ?] for these speciall uses (First) that Geo: Gill & Miles Oddy or the survivor of them shall take all my said Children and bring them up wth good raymt & Learning as they shall thinke conven[ien]t with the goods and profits of the sd lands before mentioned & when my yongest Child doth attaine to the age of Twenty one yeares the remainder of the goods which come to the hands of Geo: Gill & Miles Oddy which is unddisposed of be devided equally amongst them—

Item: I give unto Mary my now wife all the profitts of the sd Mesuage Lands & tenements untill my yongest child attains to the age abovesd and then the sd Lands wth the apurtenances to be sould by Geo: Gill & Miles Oddy trustees [illeg. word] by me which said trustees stand seized of the sd Lands & the price to be devided amongst my said Children or soe many of them as shall be then liveing

Lastly I apoint Mary my wife & Petter Inman my Brother in Law executors of this my last will & Testament provided the sd Petter Inman shall or may Claime any benifitt by vertue of this my sd will butt reasonable charges allowed him for his paines—Wittness my hand & seale the twenty fourth Day of July 1693

 

Elias Jackson [William Mason?]

Geo: [Ford?]

 

He was imprisoned in York Castle for non-payment of tithes, and died there on the 4th August 1696. His body was buried the next day in York Friends' burying-ground.6

 

John Spence was the second child and second son of [N7] George and [N13] ____ Spence.7

 

 

1 Dictionary of Quaker Biography (Friends' House Library, typescript), Philip Spence (1939) Robert and Mary Spence; parish register

2 photo of page from Record of Sufferings, Leeds University Library, reproduced on the Wright Family Tree

3 Spence (1939); TNA: RG 6/1091, /1571; wharfegen

4 Joseph Besse (1998) Sufferings of Early Quakers. Yorkshire 1652 to 1690. York: William Sessions

5 will

6 TNA: RG 6/1091, /1120

7 Spence (1939); wharfegen, accessed 2012-07-06

 


N7. GEORGE SPENCE

George Spence was born about 1605, probably in Hampsthwaite, Yorkshire.1

 

He lived in Hampsthwaite, married [N13] ____ ____, and died in February 1657/8. Their children were: Christopher (1631–1681), [N6] John (1633–1696), Mary (1635 – ?), Jane (1637–1716/7), Elizabeth (1640 – ?), William (1642–1658), and Robert (1648/9 – ?).2

 

He was buried at Hampsthwaite on 24 February 1657/8. Administration of his estate was granted to his son George on 7 October 1658.3

 

George Spence may have been the only known child of [N8] Christopher and [N9] Frances Spence.4

 

1 wharfegen, accessed 2012-07-06

2 parish register; Hampsthwaite; wharfegen, accessed 2012-07-06

3 wharfegen, accessed 2012-07-06

4 wharfegen, accessed 2012-07-06; I note, however, that Philip Spence (1939) Robert and Mary Spence shows him as the son of a Leonard Spence whose parents were [N8] Christopher and [N9] Frances Spence. The Hampsthwaite parish register confirms the baptism of a Leo: Spence, son of Leonard Spence, on 28 September 1606. Given the lack of primary evidence of George's parentage, it may be that we can only really say that he could have been either son or grandson to [N8] Christopher.

 


N8. CHRISTOPHER SPENCE

Christopher Spence was born about 1559/1579, probably in Hampsthwaite, Yorkshire.1

 

He married [N9] Frances Horner. Their only known child may have been: [N7] George (1605–1657/8).2

 

He died in March 1628/9, and was buried at Hampsthwaite on 14 March 1628/9.3

 

1 wharfegen, accessed 2016-11-29

2 wharfegen, accessed 2016-11-29; but if Philip Spence (1939) Robert and Mary Spence is correct Christopher had two sons, the younger being Leonard, who was father to [N7] George.

3 wharfegen, accessed 2016-11-29

 


N9. FRANCES SPENCE born HORNER

Frances Horner was born about 1578.1

 

She married [N8] Christopher Spence. Their only known child was: [N7] George (1605–1657/8).2

 

On 8 February 1591 she was accused, in the church court at Hampsthwaite, of fornication with Hugh Gill, who denied he'd ever even kissed her. Frances had appeared in the church court several times before, and in the archdeacon's court, for suspicious behaviour.3

 

She died in January 1618/9, and was buried at Hampsthwaite on 7 January 1618/9.4

 

Frances Horner was the daughter of [N10] Richard and [N12] Jennet Horner.5

 

1–2 wharfegen, accessed 2016-11-29

3 Wright Family Tree, citing York Cause Papers

4 wharfegen, accessed 2016-11-29

 


N10. RICHARD HORNER

Richard Horner was born about 1545.1

 

He married [N12] Jennet ____ in about 1570. Their children were: John (c. 1571 – before 1600/1), Ellen (c. 1577 – after 1600/1), [N9] Frances (c. 1578 – 1618/9), and Ann (c. 1581 – before 1607).2

 

He made his will on 11 April 1585, and died at 'Sostones', Hampsthwaite, Yorkshire, in the following weeks.3

 

His body was buried at St Thomas a Becket church, Heptonstall, Halifax, Yorkshire, in May 1585.4

 

His will was proved at Knaresborough on 12 May 1585, probate being granted to his widow and John Horner.5

 

Richard Horner was the son of [N11] _____Horner.6

 

 

1–6 wharfegen

 


N11. ____ HORNER

____ Horner was born 1504/1524.1

 

He married around 1544, and had two known children: [N10] Richard (c. 1545 – 1585) and a daughter (c. 1559 – 1625).2

 

 

1–2 wharfegen

 


N12. JENNET HORNER born ____

Jennet ____ was born 1535/1555.1

 

She married [N10] Richard Horner in about 1570. Their children were: John (c. 1571 – before 1600/1), Ellen (c. 1577 – after 1600/1), [N9] Frances (c. 1578 – 1618/9), and Ann (c. 1581 – before 1607).2

 

She was executrix of her husband's will in 1685, and was still living on 5 January 1600/1.3

 

 

1–3 wharfegen

 

 


N13. ____ SPENCE born ____

____ ____ married [N7] George Spence. Their children were: Christopher (1631–1681), [N6] John (1633–1696), Mary (1635 – ?), Jane (1637–1716/7), Elizabeth (1640 – ?), William (1642–1658), and Robert (1648/9 – ?).1

 

 

1 parish register; wharfegen, accessed 2012-07-06

 


N14. MARY SPENCE born INMAN

Mary Inman was baptised at St Mary/Cuthbert's church, Pateley Bridge, Yorkshire, on the 8th November 1640.1

 

She married [N6] John Spence on the 30th December 1660, at Henry Settle's, Harefield in Netherdale. Their children were: John (1663 – ?), Mary (1666 – after 1701), Hannah (1668–1684), Sarah (1670 – after 1708), Rachel (1672/3–1699), [N5] Joseph (1677–1752), Abraham (1679–1752), Ruth (1682–1768), and Hannah (1684/5–1768); all were born in Yorkshire.2

 

On the 12th June 1670 she was apparently fined under the Conventicle Act for attendance at meeting at Bainbrigg Pastures.3

 

On the 5th April 1698 she renounced her right to administer her late husband's estate, of which she had been appointed co-executor with her brother Peter Inman.4

Of Darley, she died on the 6th December 1719 and was buried at Dacre fbg.5

 

Mary Inman was the eldest child of [N15] Christopher and [N20] Mary Inman.6

 

1–2 TNA: RG 6/1091, /1571; parish register

3 Joseph Besse (1998) Sufferings of Early Quakers. Yorkshire 1652 to 1690. York: William Sessions

4 John Spence's will

5 TNA: RG 6/1091, /1571

6 parish register; wharfegen

 


N15. CHRISTOPHER INMAN

Christopher Inman was baptised at St Mary/Cuthbert's church, Pateley Bridge, Yorkshire, on 18 November 1596.1

 

He first married Frances Smith (cal 1609 – 1636), on 8 May 1634, at Pateley Bridge. Their only child was Margaret (1636 – ?), b. Pateley Bridge.2

 

He married, secondly, [N20] Mary (Maria) Darnbrough on 27 January 1639/40, at Pateley Bridge. They had four children: [N14] Mary (1640–1719), Henry (1642–1647), Henry (1647–1724), and Ann (1650–1674), all b. Pateley Bridge.3

 

His body was buried at St Mary/Cuthbert's church, Pateley Bridge, on 14 March 1680/1.4

 

Christopher Inman was the second child, and second son, of [N16] Henry and [N19] Isabel Inman.5

 

 

 

1–5 wharfegen

2 parish register; wharfegen

3 parish register; wharfegen

4–5 wharfegen

 


N16. HENRY INMAN

Henry Inman was baptised at St Mary/Cuthbert's church, Pateley Bridge, Yorkshire, on 31 May 1567.1

 

He married [N19] Isabel(la) Gryme/Graham on 18 May 1592, at Pateley Bridge. Their children were: Wilfred (1593 – c. 1656), [N15] Christopher (1596–1680/1), Peter (1599–1685), Marmaduke (1602/1622–1667/8), and Ann (c. 1609 – after 1649), all b. Pateley Bridge.2

 

His body was buried at St Mary/Cuthbert's church, Pateley Bridge, on 14 May 1639.3

 

Henry Inman was the eldest child of [N17] Peter and [N18] Anne Inman.4

 

 

1–2 wharfegen

3 parish register

4 wharfegen

 


N17. PETER INMAN

Peter Inman married [N18] Anne ____, presumably around 1566. They had three children: [N16] Henry (1567–1639), Edward (1570–1599), and Ambrose (1571–1607/8), all b. Pateley Bridge.1

 

He made his will on 13 April 1574, as below; it was proved in the York Registry on 20 November that year.2

 

In the name of god amen The thirtenthe daye of Aprill in the yeare of oure Lorde god a thowesande five hundrithe Seaventie fower I Peter Inman sicke in my bodie but of good and pfecte remembrance Lawde and prayse be unto almightie god do ordeyne and make this my laste will and testamente in manner and fforme ffolloweinge ffirste I bequithe and comende my soule to god almightie my maker & redemer and my bodie to be buried within the churche yearde of Pateleybridge at the Instruction of my friends Item I bequithe my farmhoulde whiche now I do dwell upon to Anne my wiffe to helpe and to bringe upp and kepe my children so longe as she do kepe her selfe sole & unmaryed, and after to henrye my sone. Item I bequithe by Legacie to henrie my sone one whce calffe. of collor blacke Item I bequithe one other blacke whce calffe to Amerne my wiffe sone Item my will and minde is that all my goode and chattelle shalbe sett and devided into three ptes that is to saye one parte to Anne my Wiffe the seconde pte to My sones Henrie and Amerne the thirde pte to Coste and Chardges Concerynge my funeral exspences Item the reste of my goode not bequithed my funeral exspences deducte contented paide I give and bequeathe to Amerne my sone Item I make Supervysores of this my last will to so my will and mynde hearin be fulfilled Edwarde Inman and Thoms Sympson Item I make my executore Anne my Wiffe and henrie my sone to se this my Laste Will and testamente be fulfilled discharged and my truste is in theme.

 

1 wharfegen; will

2 will; Wills in the York Registry

 


N18. ANNE INMAN born ____

Anne ____ married [N17] Peter Inman, presumably around 1566. They had three children: [N16] Henry (1567–1639), Edward (1570–1599), and Ambrose (1571–1607/8), all b. Pateley Bridge.1

 

 

1 wharfegen; will

 


N19. ISABEL INMAN born GRYME/GRAHAM

Isabel(la) Graham married [N16] Henry Inman on 18 May 1592, at Pateley Bridge. Their children were: Wilfred (1593 – c. 1656), [N15] Christopher (1596–1680/1), Peter (1599–1685), Marmaduke (1602/1622–1667/8), and Ann (c. 1609 – after 1649), all b. Pateley Bridge.1

 

Her body was buried at St Mary/Cuthbert's church, Pateley Bridge, on 15 Aug 1641.2

 

 

1–2 wharfegen

 


N20. MARY INMAN born DARNBROUGH

Mary Darnborough (Maria Darnebrocke) was baptised at St Mary/Cuthbert's church, Pateley Bridge, Yorkshire, on 16 August 1601.1

 

She married [N15] Christopher Inman on 27 January 1639/40, at Pateley Bridge. They had four children: [N14] Mary (1640–1719), Henry (1642–1647), Henry (1647–1724), and Ann (1650–1674), all b. Pateley Bridge.2

 

Mary Darnborough was the youngest child of [N21] Ninian and [N56] Jennet Darnbrough.3

 

 

1 wharfegen. NB doubt has been cast on this relationship, given that if it is correct Mary Inman would have had her last child at the age of 49, which though possible is pretty unlikely.

2 parish register; wharfegen

3 wharfegen

 

 


N21. NINIAN DARNBROUGH

Ninian Darnbrough was baptised at St Mary/Cuthbert's church, Pateley Bridge, Yorkshire, on 30 January 1565/6.1

 

He married [N24] Jennet Fryer at St Mary/Cuthbert's church, Pateley Bridge, on 20 September 1584. They had seven children: John (1585–1585), Humphrey (1586–1586), Samson (1588 – ?), Gabriel (1591–1595), Christopher (1594 – ?), John (1598–1678/9), and [N20] Mary (Maria) (1601 – ?), all b. Pateley Bridge.2

 

Ninian Darnbrough was the second child and second son of [N22] Samson and [N23] Margaret Darnborough.3

 

 

 

1 parish register

2 parish register; wharfegen

3 wharfegen

 


 

N22. SAMSON DARNBROUGH

Samson Darnbrough (Darnebrocke) married [N23] Margaret Kidd at St Mary/Cuthbert's church, Pateley Bridge, on 12 December 1561. They had three children: Ninian (1562–1563), [N21] Ninian (1565 – after 1601), and Jane (1568 – ?), all b. Pateley Bridge.1

 

 

 

1 "England Marriages, 1538–1973", database, FamilySearch: 12 March 2020, Margaret Kidd in entry for Sampson Darnebrocke, 1561; wharfegen

 


N23. MARGARET DARNBROUGH born KIDD

Margaret Kidd married [N11G] Samson Darnbrough at St Mary/Cuthbert's church, Pateley Bridge, on 12 December 1561. They had three children: Ninian (1562–1563), [N21] Ninian (1565 – after 1601), and Jane (1568 – ?), all b. Pateley Bridge.1

 

 

 

1 "England Marriages, 1538–1973", database, FamilySearch: 12 March 2020, Margaret Kidd in entry for Sampson Darnebrocke, 1561; wharfegen

 

 


N24. JENNET DARNBROUGH born FRYER

Jennet Fryer (or Freare) married [N21] Ninian Darnbrough at St Mary/Cuthbert's church, Pateley Bridge, on 20 September 1584. They had seven children: John (1585–1585), Humphrey (1586–1586), Samson (1588 – ?), Gabriel (1591–1595), Christopher (1594 – ?), John (1598–1678/9), and [N20] Mary (Maria) (1601 – ?), all b. Pateley Bridge.1

 

 

 

1 parish register; wharfegen

 

 


N25. SARAH SPENCE born ____

Sarah ____ married [N5] Joseph Spence in 1700, and lived at Menwith Hill, Hampsthwaite. They had seven children: John (1701 – ?), Abraham (1703 – before 1719), Mary (1706–1737), Hannah (1710–1715), Sarah (1710/1 – ?), Rachel (1713 – ?), and [N4] Joseph (1714/5–1779).1

 

She died on the 3rd April 1715.2

 

 

1 TNA: RG 6/1091

2 TNA: RG 6/1571

 


N26. GRACE SPENCE born BRAMLEY

Grace Bramley was born at Langbar, Nesfield-with-Langbar, Ilkley, Yorkshire, in about 1715, and was baptised at the church of All Saints, Ilkley, on 12 February 1715/6.1

 

She married [N4] Joseph Spence on the 10th June 1739, at Dacre. Their children were: Joseph (1740/1–1752), [N3] Robert (1742–1793), Mary (1744–1751), John (1746–1806), Grace (1749–1801), Abraham (1750/1–1752), Mary (1754–1754), Sarah (1755 – before 1841), and Rachel (1761–1836).2

 

In 1774 she lived in Darley, Hampsthwaite, Yorkshire.3

 

She died on the 30th August 1781, and was buried at the Friends burying ground in Dacre on 2 September.4

 

Grace Bramley was the eldest child of [N27] Robert and [N46] Thomasin(a) Bramley.5

 

 

1 TNA: RG 6/898; wharfegen; "England Births and Christenings, 1538–1975", database, FamilySearch: 19 March 2020, Grace Bramley, 1716.

2 TNA: RG 6/890, /1091, /1571

3–5 RG 6/898, /1571; wharfegen also gives mother's name as Thomasina Moon, but it is possible that the Ilkley baptism, and the 1714 Skipton marriage of that Grace Bramley's parents relate to a different family

 


N27. ROBERT BRAMLEY

Robert Bramley was baptised at Fewston, Yorkshire, in January, 1681.1

 

On 26th December 1714 he married [N46] Thomasin(a) Moon, at the Priory Church, Bolton Abbey, Skipton-in-Craven, Yorkshire. Their children were: [N26] Grace (1715–1781), Ann (1724–1787), and Isabel(la) (1725–1808), all b. Langbar, Nesfield-with-Langbar, Ilkley, Yorkshire.2

 

In 1724 he was recorded as a baker. In 1739 he lived at Whitmore House, Bramley Head, West End, Thruscross, Fewston, Yorkshire.3

 

He died in November 1775, being buried on the 13th at St Michael's Church, Fewston.4

 

Robert Bramley was the third child and third son of [N28] William and [N39] Isabella Bramley.5

 

 

1 "England Births and Christenings, 1538–1975", database, FamilySearch: 18 September 2020, Robert Bramley, 1681

2 wharfegen

3 Dictionary of Quaker Biography (Friends' House Library, typescript); TNA: RG 6/1571; wharfegen

4 wharfegen

5 FamilySearch

 


N28. WILLIAM BRAMLEY

William Bramley was baptised at St Michael's Church, Fewston, Yorkshire, on 10th October 1652.1

 

On the 26th November 1676, at St Michael's Church, Fewston, he married, first, [N39] Isabel(la) Banister. Their children were: John (1677 – ?), William (1679 – ?), and [N27] Robert (1681–1775), all b. Fewston.2

 

The name of his second wife isn't yet known, but their children were: Francis (1683–1685), Thomas (1685 – ?), George (1688 – ?), Isabel(la) (1691–1693), Benjamin (1693 – ?), Mary (1696–1733), Adam (1700–1702), and Matthew (1708–1729), all b. Fewston.3

 

He was buried on Christmas Day, 1707, at St Michael's Church.4

 

William Bramley was the eldest child of [N29] John and [N38] Dorothy Bramley.5

 

 

1 "England Births and Christenings, 1538–1975", database, FamilySearch: 18 September 2020, William Bramley, 1652

2-4 wharfegen

 


N29. JOHN BRAMLEY

John Bramley was baptised at Fewston, Yorkshire, on 3rd August 1606.1

 

He married [N38] Dorothy ____. Their children were: [N28] William (1652–1707), Isabel(la) (1653 – ?), George (1660–1660), (child) (c. 1661 – 1661/2), Marie (1664–1664), Dorothy (1665–1742), and Francis (1668–1668), all b. Fewston.2

 

His body was buried at St Michael's, Fewston, on 13th June 1676.3

 

John Bramley was the eldest child of [N30] Francis and [N33] Isabel(la) Bramley.4

 

 

1 "England Births and Christenings, 1538–1975", database, FamilySearch: 18 September 2020, John Bramley, 1606.

2-3 wharfegen

4 FamilySearch

 

 


N30. FRANCIS BRAMLEY

Francis Bramley was born c. 1559.1

 

On 30th June 1605 he married [N33] Isabel(la) Brayshaw, at St Michael's Church, Linton-in-Craven, Yorkshire. Their children were: [N29] John (1606–1676), Mary (1608 – ?), Francis (1610–1688), George (1613–1682), Ann (1615–1644), William (1619–1619), Isabella (1620–1685), and Elizabeth (1624 – ?), all b. Fewston, Yorkshire.2

 

Francis Bramley was the eldest child of [N31] John and [N32] Grace Bramley.3

 

1-3 wharfegen

 

 

 


N31. JOHN BRAMLEY

John Bramley married [N32] Grace ____. Their children were: [N30] Francis (? – ?), Ellen (? – ?), John (? – ?), William (? – ?), and Robert (? – ?).1

 

He made his will on 2nd May 1606:

 

I, John Bramley of Withrawe laine in Fuiston parishe &c., to be buryed in Fuiston Church yearde &c.
It is my will and trew meanninge that Grace, my wieffe, and Frauncis, my sonne, shall have the occupacon of my tenemente to ther owne uses after ther owne myndes, equally betwene them, after my decease, for those yeares yet to expire in my lease, if she, my saide wieffe, so longe shall live and keepe her unmarryede; and if she marry or die before thende of those yeares, then my will is that the remainder of my yeares shall remaine to my sonne Frauncis Bramley and Ellen Bramley, my daughter, equally between them duringe all the yeares not expirede.
My will is that my goodes be devided into thre partes, one therof shall remaine to my wieffe; one other unto all my children, equally to be devided amongste them, savinge that John, William and Robert shall alowe and abate, every one of them, xl s. a peice of ther partes, for and in consideracon of suche goodes and helpes as they have had alredie at my handes.
The thirde parte, first hereof I give to Ellen, my daughter, one cowe called Alblacke, one chiste, one cuboorde and one table; to my wieffe one gardede whie and the yonger meare. All the reste of my goodes &c. I give unto my said wieffe, whome I make sole executrix.

Witnesses: Nich. Smithsonn, clarke, Hen. Graver, Will. Jeffrey, John Wrather.

Membrane 14. 3 and 4 James 1.

Grace, the relict of John Bramley, of Withrawe, deceased, is admitted as executrix of his will.

He may have died the same day, as his body was buried at St Michael's Church, Fewston, on 3rd May 1606.3

 

1 wharfegen

2 wharfegen, citing Knaresborough Wills, Vol. I

3 wharfegen

 

 

 


N32. GRACE BRAMLEY born ____

Grace ____ married [N31] John Bramley. Their children were: [N30] Francis (? – ?), Ellen (? – ?), John (? – ?), William (? – ?), and Robert (? – ?).1

 

Her body was buried at St Thomas of Canterbury Church, Hampsthwaite, Yorkshire, on 18th December 1616.2

 

1-2 wharfegen

 

 


N33. ISABEL(LA) BRAMLEY born BRAYSHAW

On 30th June 1605 Isabel(la) Brayshaw married [N30] Francis Bramley, at St Michael's Church, Linton-in-Craven, Yorkshire. Their children were: [N29] John (1606–1676), Mary (1608 – ?), Francis (1610–1688), George (1613–1682), Ann (1615–1644), William (1619–1619), Isabella (1620–1685), and Elizabeth (1624 – ?), all b. Fewston, Yorkshire.1

 

Her body was buried at St Michael's Church, Fewston, on 10th April 1641.2

 

Isabel(la) Brayshaw was the fourth child and second daughter of [N34] William and [N37] Isabella Brayshaw.3

 

 

1-3 wharfegen

 

 


N34. WILLIAM BRAYSHAW

William Brayshaw married [N37] Isabel(la) Wren on 9th April 1570, at St Michael's Church, Linton-in-Craven, Yorkshire. Their children were: Robert (1573–1632), Maudlen (c. 1576 – ?), John (1582 – ?), [N33] Isabel(la) (? – 1641), Ann (1585 – ?), Agnes (1590–1679/80), and William (? – 1653), all b. Linton-in-Craven.1

 

He was the only known child of Robert and Elizabeth Brayshaw.2

 

1-2 wharfegen

 

 


N35. ROBERT BRAYSHAW

Robert Brayshaw married [N36] Elizabeth ____. Their only known child was [N34] William (? – ?).1

 

His body was buried at St Michael's Church, Linton-in-Craven, Yorkshire, on 20th November 1574.

 

 

1-2 wharfegen

 

 


N36. ELIZABETH BRAYSHAW born ____

Elizabeth ____ married [N35] Robert Brayshaw. Their only known child was [N34] William (? – ?).1

 

 

1 wharfegen

 

 


N37. ISABEL(LA) BRAYSHAW born WREN

Isabel(la) Wren, of Linton-in Craven, Yorkshire, married [N34] William Brayshaw on 9th April 1570, at St Michael's Church, Linton-in-Craven. Their children were: Robert (1573–1632), Maudlen (c. 1576 – ?), John (1582 – ?), [N33] Isabel(la) (? – 1641), Ann (1585 – ?), Agnes (1590–1679/80), and William (? – 1653), all b. Linton-in-Craven.1

 

1 wharfegen

 

 


N38. DOROTHY BRAMLEY born ____

She married [N29] John Bramley. Their children were: [N28] William (1652–1707), Isabel(la) (1653 – ?), George (1660–1660), (child) (c. 1661 – 1661/2), Marie (1664–1664), Dorothy (1665–1742), and Francis (1668–1668), all b. Fewston.1

 

Her body was buried at St Michael's, Fewston, on 7th November 1684.2

 

 

1-2 wharfegen

 

 


N39. ISABEL(LA) BRAMLEY born BANISTER

Isabel Banister was baptised at Fewston, Yorkshire, on 6th May 1649.1

 

 

On the 26th November 1676, at St Michael's Church, Fewston, she married [N28] William Bramley. Their children were: John (1677 – ?), William (1679 – ?), and [N27] Robert (1681–1775), all b. Fewston.2

 

 

Her body was buried at St Michael's Church, Fewston, in January 1680/1.3

 

 

Isabel Banister was the daughter of [N40] John and [N43] Jane Banister.4

 

1 "England Births and Christenings, 1538–1975", database, FamilySearch: 18 September 2020, Isabel Banister, 1649

2-4 wharfegen

 

 


N40. JOHN BANISTER

John Banister was baptised at St Mary-le-Gill Church, Barnoldswick, Yorkshire, on 25th August 1608.1

 

He married, first, Margaret Frankland, on 3rd October 1625, at Barnoldswick. Their only child was Jane (1633–1633/4), b. Fewston, Yorkshire.2

 

A gentleman, of Fewston, he married, secondly, [N43] Jane Claphamson, at St Alkelda's Church, Giggleswick, Yorkshire, on 4th September 1637, by licence. Their children were: John (1638 – ?), Mary/Marie (1639–1640/1), Ellen/Helen (1640 – ?), Robert (1642 – ?), Mary/Marie (1644–1695), Jane (1644 – ?), (child) (c. 1646 – 1647), Dorothy (1646 – ?), (child) (c. 1647 – 1648), [N39] Isabel(la) (1649–1680/1), Henry (1651 – ?), Ralph (1654–1735/6), and Martha (c. 1657 – 1657/8), all b. Fewston.3

 

His body was buried at St Michael's Church, Fewston, on 28th February 1657/8.4

 

John Banister was the son of [N41] Richard and [N42] Ellen/Helen Banister.

 

1 "England Births and Christenings, 1538–1975", database, FamilySearch: 19 March 2020, John Banister, 1608; wharfegen

2 "England Marriages, 1538–1973", database, FamilySearch: 12 March 2020, John Banister, 1625

3 wharfegen; Paver's Marriage Licences Vol. 1 1630–1644

4 wharfegen

 


N41. RICHARD BANISTER

Richard Banister of Barnoldswick married [N42] Ellen/Helen ____. Their children were: Jane (1599 – ?), Mary/Marie (1601 – ?), Martha (1602–1656), Ralph (1603–1605), Ann (1607 – ?), Susan(na) (1608 – ?), [N40] John (1608–1657/8), and Ralph (1612 – ?), all b. Barnoldswick, Yorkshire.1

 

His body was buried at St Michael's Church, Fewston, Yorkshire, on 15th October 1656.2

 

1-2 wharfegen

 

 


 

N42. ELLEN/HELEN BANISTER born ____

Ellen/Helen ____ married [N41] Richard Banister. Their children were: Jane (1599 – ?), Mary/Marie (1601 – ?), Martha (1602–1656), Ralph (1603–1605), Ann (1607 – ?), Susan(na) (1608 – ?), [N40] John (1608–1657/8), and Ralph (1612 – ?), all b. Barnoldswick, Yorkshire.1

 

Her body was buried at St Michael's Church, Fewston, Yorkshire, on 1st September 1641.2

 

 

1-2 wharfegen

 

 


N43. JANE BANISTER born CLAPHAMSON

Jana Claphamson was baptised at Giggleswick, Yorkshire, on 1st September 1616. Of Giggleswick, she married [N40] John Banister, at St Alkelda's Church, Giggleswick, Yorkshire, on 4th September 1637, by licence. Their children were: John (1638 – ?), Mary/Marie (1639–1640/1), Ellen/Helen (1640 – ?), Robert (1642 – ?), Mary/Marie (1644–1695), Jane (1644 – ?), (child) (c. 1646 – 1647), Dorothy (1646 – ?), (child) (c. 1647 – 1648), [N39] Isabel(la) (1649–1680/1), Henry (1651 – ?), Ralph (1654–1735/6), and Martha (c. 1657 – 1657/8), all b. Fewston.1

 

Her body was buried at St Michael's Church, Fewston, Yorkshire, on 23rd September 1671.2

 

Jane Claphamson was the daughter of Henry and Maria Claphamson.3

 

 

1 parish register transcript; Yorkshire Baptisms; wharfegen; Paver's Marriage Licences Vol. 1 1630–1644

2 wharfegen

3 parish register transcript; Yorkshire Baptisms

 


N44. HENRY CLAPHAMSON

Henricus Claphamson married Elizabeth Edlestone (? – 1603/4) at Giggleswick, on 4th May 1583.1

 

Their children were: Thomas (1588 – ?), Susanna (1591 – ?), Isabella (1594 – ?), Thomas (1595 – ?), Elizabeth (1595 – ?), and Henry (1599 – ?), all bapt. Giggleswick.2

 

He married, secondly, [N45] Maria Lambert at Giggleswick, on 10th October 1615. Their children were: [N43] Jana (1616 – ?), Robert (1618 – ?), Ellena (1621 – ?), and Hugo (1623 – ?), all bapt. Giggleswick.3

 

 

 

1 parish register transcript

2 FamilySearch

3 parish register transcript

 


N45. Maria CLAPHAMSON born LAMBERT

Maria Lambert married [N44] Henry Claphamson at Giggleswick, Yorkshire, on 10th October 1615.1

 

Their children were: [N43] Jana (1616 – ?), Robert (1618 – ?), Ellena (1621 – ?), and Hugo (1623 – ?), all bapt. Giggleswick.2

 

 

1 parish register transcript

2 parish register transcript

 

 


N46. THOMASIN(A) BRAMLEY born MOON

"Tomisin Moun" was baptised at the Priory Church, Bolton Abbey, Yorkshire, on 20th January 1694/5.1

 

On 26th December 1714 she married [N27] Robert Bramley, at the Priory Church, Bolton Abbey, Skipton-in-Craven, Yorkshire. Their children were: [N26] Grace (1715–1781), Ann (1724–1787), and Isabel(la) (1725–1808), all b. Langbar, Nesfield-with-Langbar, Ilkley, Yorkshire.2

 

Of West End, Thruscross, Fewston, Yorkshire, her body was buried at St Michael's Church, Fewston, on 28th May 1779.3

 

Thomasin(a) Moon was the second child of [N47] Thomas and [N48] Ann Moone.4

 

 

1 "England Births and Christenings, 1538–1975", database, FamilySearch: 18 September 2020, Tomisin Moun, 1694; wharfegen

2-4 wharfegen

 

 


N47. THOMAS MOONE

Thomas Moone married [N48] Ann Anderton on 27th January 1678/9, at Holy Trinity Church, Skipton-in-Craven, Yorkshire. Their children were: Major/Mauger (1684 – ?) and [N46] Tomasin(a) (1694–1779), both b. Bolton Abbey, Yorkshire.1

 

His body was buried at the Priory Church, Bolton Abbey, on 6th April 1709.2

 

1-2 wharfegen

 

 


 

N48. ANN MOONE born ANDERTON

Ann Anderton married [N47] Thomas Moone on 27th January 1678/9, at Holy Trinity Church, Skipton-in-Craven, Yorkshire. Their children were: Major/Mauger (1684 – ?) and [N46] Tomasin(a) (1694–1779), both b. Bolton Abbey, Yorkshire.1

 

Her body was buried at the Priory Church, Bolton Abbey, on 6th October 1728.2

 

1-2 wharfegen

 

 


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