Children of William and Isabel Burton

01. Elizabeth Burton

c. 1672 b. The genealogy site of Carol Ann Herbert; Carol Herbert gedcom [dead link]


02. Agnes Burton

1676 b. Rachel Labouchere (1988) Abiah Darby of Coalbrookdale. York: Sessions
1675-12-25 bapt. Dent, Yorkshire "England Births and Christenings, 1538–1975," database, FamilySearch: 11 February 2018, Agnes Burton, 25 Dec 1675, citing DENT, YORK, index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City, FHL microfilm 100,090
1704-05-03 m. Christopher Mason (1671–1746/7, bapt. Dent, s. of Anthony Mason), at Leeyeat fmh, "with consent of parents Relations & friends" TNA: PRO RG 6/1246, /1547; "England Births and Christenings, 1538–1975," database, FamilySearch: 11 February 2018, Christopher Mason, 25 Feb 1671, citing DENT, YORK, index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City, FHL microfilm 100,090
Children Jane (1704–1766), William (1708 – ?), Isabel (1710 – after 1738), Mary (1711–1737), Thomas (1712–1712), Margret (1717 – after 1744), Elizabeth (1720–1737), and Mary (? – 1743), all b. Dent, Westmorland PRO RG 6/1246, /1547; Labouchere (1988); "England Marriages, 1538–1973," database, FamilySearch: 10 February 2018, Thomas Ewan and Isabel Mason, 24 Sep 1738, citing Burton in Kendal, Westmorland, reference index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City, FHL microfilm 97,359
1754-09-07 "a publick friend"; d. RG 6/1246, /1547
1754-09-09 bur. Dent RG 6/1246


03. Alice Burton

cal 1678 b. William Evans and Thomas Evans, eds (1854) Piety Promoted, in a collection of dying sayings of many of the people called Quakers . . . . Philadelphia
1706

became a minister, at first with just a few words, but her gift grew: "though she had not much human learning, she was frequently furnished with copious expressions well adapted to the matter she had to deliver, deep and weighty in her delivery, and enabled to speak feelingly to the state of meetings and individuals"

Rebecca Larson (1999) Daughters of Light: Quaker Women Preaching and Prophesying in the Colonies and Abroad, 1700–1775. New York: Knopf
1713 visited Scotland information from Brian Davey
1716 visited the south of England
1717-05-08 of Dent, Yorkshire; m. Ralph Alderson (1689–1772, yeoman, of Nathwaite, Ravenstonedale), at Loaning fmh, Dent TNA: PRO RG 6/1235, /1246, /1547; Ben Simpson (2015) The Generations in Between. Oxford: Graffiti Press
Children: Simon (1717/8–1773), William (1719–1795), John (1721–1764), and Agnes (1724–1798), all b. Ravenstonedale, Westmorland PRO RG 6/500, /673, /731, /874, /1143, /1246, /1493; Evans and Evans, eds (1854)
1720 visited Ireland information from Brian Davey
1722 visited Cumberland
1732/1734-05 visited America minutes of Philadelphia YM; information from Brian Davey
1735 with Thomas Burton, visited the Bishopric of Durham information from Brian Davey
1736 attended the half year's meeting at Dublin, and later travelled in Yorkshire and Lincolnshire
1737 visited Northumberland and the Bishopric
1740 visited Cumberland
1741 visited Lancashire and East and South Yorkshire
1743 visited Ireland, "a grave Elderly Matron" Larson (1999)
1745 visited Yorkshire information from Brian Davey
1748 visited Cheshire and Derbyshire
1766-08-15 d. minutes of Philadelphia YM; Evans and Evans, eds (1854)
1766-08-18 bur. Ravenstondale fbg RG 6/1493; Evans and Evans, eds (1854)
 

ALICE ALDERSON, wife of Ralph Alderson, of Ravenstondale, in the county of Westmoreland, was convinced of the truth in her young years, and carefully abiding under its divine teachings consistent to the advice of the wise king Solomon, "Trust in the Lord with all thy heart, and lean not to thy own understanding," she came to receive a gift in the ministry, and though for a considerable time in a few words, yet greatly to the edification of the church. Being faithful in a little, she witnessed an increase therein, and, clothed with the comeliness of the gospel, became valuable in the Lord's house, devoting the prime and flower of her youth, her middle age and decline of life, to his service; labouring diligently in the cause of truth, both in England, Scotland, and Ireland, and once in America; in all which, her labours of lover were well received, and tended much to the edification of the church. In her ministry, though she had not much human learning, she was frequently furnished with copious expressions well adapted to the matter she had to deliver, deep and weighty in her delivery, and enabled to speak feelingly to the state of meetings and individuals. She was remarkably diligent in attending meetings when at home, even to old age, often signifying that she believed none would be injured thereby in their outward circumstances, as the blessing of Divine Providence upon the honest endeavours of the faithful would be ample recompense for all their labour and seeming loss of time. When old age had so far weakened her constitution that she could no longer attend meetings, she retained the diving anointing which had been her support through the various stages of life.

The last meeting she was at, being the day she took to her bed, she had to revive the encouraging invitation of the prophet Hosea, "Come and let us return unto the Lord, for he hath torn and he will heal us; he hat smitten and he will bind us up; after two days will he revive us; in the third day he will raise us up, and we shall live in his sight. Then shall we know, if we follow on to know the Lord, his going forth is prepared as the morning, and he shall come to us as the rain, as the latter and former rain unto the earth." Hosea vi. 1, 2, 3.

A few days before her departure, when some friends were sitting by her, she was remarkably favoured with the overshadowing of divine goodness, wherein she had weightily to caution ministers and elders to be exceedingly watchful over their own spirits, strongly advising them to live in the bond of love and unity, signifying she clearly saw the subtle enemy of man's happiness endeavouring to draw them aside, in order to mar or deface that work which Divine Providence allotted them to be engaged in, saying that the Lord had permitted her to be buffetted and brought low, even to the gates of hell, and had again in great mercy lifted up her head and given her the glorious earnest of eternal happiness; concluding in fervent prayer for the small meeting she was a member of, and for all the small gatherings of the Lord's people the world over.

In the time of her illness she was afflicted with exceedingly sharp pain, which she bore with great resignation, often praying for patience to bear what might be permitted to be laid on her. A divine serenity and sweetness accompanied her last moments, that indeed it might be said her sun went down in brightness.

She departed this live on the 15th of the Eighth month, 1766, and was honourably interred in Friends' burial-ground the 18th of the same, at Ravenstondale, accompanied by many Friends and others; aged eighty-eight, and a minister sixty years.

Evans and Evans, eds (1854)


04. John Burton


05. Isabell Burton

1684-07-06 bapt. Dent, Yorkshire "England Births and Christenings, 1538–1975," database, FamilySearch: 11 February 2018, Isabell Burton, 06 Jul 1684, citing DENT, YORK, index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City, FHL microfilm 100,090


06. Margaret Burton

1685-09-06 bapt. Dent, Yorkshire "England Births and Christenings, 1538–1975," database, FamilySearch: 11 February 2018, Margrett Burton, 06 Sep 1685, citing index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City, FHL microfilm 100,090
1711-07-04 of Enfield, Middlesex; m.1. Josiah Langdale (1673–1723, maltster, of Bridlington, Yorkshire, s. of Joseph Langdale), at Enfield fmh TNA: PRO RG 6/496, /1177
Children with first husband: Josiah (1711–1712), Mary (1713–1751), and John (1714–1769, all b. Bridlington PRO RG 6/1119; Crosby-Langdale Family Tree
  a travelling minister Quaker Strongrooms
1715/1716 during Josiah’s second visit to America, undertook a religious visit to Ireland (and her concern for Irish Friends is one of the subjects of a manuscript letter of hers in the Library)
c. 1717 journeyed to the continent
published Aan de Inwoonderen van de Steden Leeuwaarden, Harlingen, en Workum in Friesland, en Medenblik in Noord-Holland, of which the sole surviving copy is in Friends House Library; in the text she addresses the inhabitants (and also the “Vermaaner”—the Mennonite preachers) of the areas, exhorting them all to live upright lives, avoiding frivolity, strong drink, tobacco, and any worldly preaching, singing and praying not inspired directly by God’s spirit
1723 left England to settle in Pennsylvania, with her husband and their two surviving children; her husband died on the voyage
shortly after 1724-05-29 m.2. Samuel Preston (1665–1743, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) women's minutes, Philadelphia MM; Quaker Strongrooms; Crosby-Langdale Family Tree
1724/1729 continued her travelling ministry once she was in America, visiting Long Island, Rhode Island, Nantucket, New Hampshire, Maryland, Virginia and North Carolina; is said to have had an "excellent gift in the ministry" Quaker Strongrooms
1742-06-23 d. in America Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, Vol. II

Margaret Preston, wife of our dear Friend Samuel Preston, was endued with an excellent Gift in the Ministry, and travelled much in the Service of Truth, through this and the adjacent provinces, here Testimony being lively, sound, and edifying, was well received among Friends, being likewise well qualified for the maintenance of our Discipline. She became a serviceable and useful Instrument for the promotion & support of hour Christian Testimony. She departed this life the 23d. of the 6th. Month, 1752, In the 58th Year of her age.

minutes of Philadelphia YM, and alt version, omitting the word struck out


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