Children of John Foster and Elizabeth Spence

01. (John) Foster Spence

1844-09-30 b. North Shields, Northumberland censuses; Joseph Foster (1871) Pedigrees of the Forsters and Fosters of the North of England. Privately printed; Old York Scholars' Association (1971) Bootham School Register. London: Oyez Press
1851 scholar at home, of Howard Street (east side), Tynemouth, Northumberland, living with family, two journeymen draper's assistants, two draper's apprentices, a cook, and two housemaids TNA: PRO HO 107/2410 f165 p55
1857/1860 at Bootham School Edgar B. Collinson, ed. (1935) Bootham School Register
1861 draper's assistant, of Chirton Cottage, Chirton, Tynemouth, living with his family and two house servants PRO RG 9/3838 f32 p2
1871 not found in census  
1881 draper's assistant, of 5 Chirton Cottages, Chirton, Northumberland, living with his family, mother's companion, a cook, and a housemaid RG 11/5076 f48 p1
1891 wholesale provn trader, employed, of Chirton Cottage, Chirton, living with his father, a cook, and a housemaid RG 12/4224 f116 p52
1901 wholesale provision merchant, employer, of Chirton Cottage, Chirton, living with his father, sister, two nieces, a cook, a housemaid, and a visitor RG 13/4801 f5 p1
1901-07-24 among the mourners at his father's funeral in Tynemouth Shields Daily Gazette, 1901-07-25
1911 clerk to butter importer, worker, of 54 Front Street, Tynemouth, living with his sister and a boarder; 8 rooms RG14PN30736 RG78PN1758 RD559 SD2 ED4 SN240
  of 2 The Grove, Tynemouth, with Clephan & Weincke, Provision Merchants, Newcastle Collinson, ed. (1935)
1917-01-14 clerk; admitted to The Retreat; two previous attacks; duration 1 month; contributory factors intemperance, epileptic; general health poor; confusional insanity male medical register, The Retreat
1917-02-01 retired commercial clerk, of 54 Front-Street, Tynemouth; d. at The Retreat, York National Probate Calendar
1917-02-05T11:30 bur. Preston cemetery, North Shields Newcastle Journal, 1917-02-05
1917-04-02 will proved at Newcastle by sister Mary Emma Spence; effects £189 12s. 11d. National Probate Calendar


 02. Thomas Spence

1846-04-06 b. North Shields, Northumberland censuses; Joseph Foster (1871) Pedigrees of the Forsters and Fosters of the North of England. Privately printed; Old York Scholars' Association (1971) Bootham School Register. London: Oyez Press
1851 scholar at home, of Howard Street (east side), Tynemouth, Northumberland, living with his family, two journeymen draper's assistants, two draper's apprentices, a cook, and two housemaids TNA: PRO HO 107/2410 f165 p55
1857/1862 at Bootham School, York, Yorkshire OYSA (1971)
1861 scholar, of Friends School, St Giles, York PRO RG 9/3545 f15 p24
1871 draper's son, of Chirton Cottages, Chirton, Tynemouth,  Northumberland, living with his parents, a companion, and a domestic servant RG 10/5114 f68 p7
1874-05-26 m. Isabella Morland (1848–1926, of Reigate, d. of Thomas and Sarah Sophia Morland), at St Mark's, Reigate, Surrey UK censuses; GRO index; Year: 1920,Census Place: Jacksonville Ward 10, Duval, Florida, Roll: T625_218; Page: 6A; Enumeration District: 67, Image: 947; OYSA (1971); Globe, 1874-05-29; Marriage Locator
Children: John Morland (1876–1951), George M. (cal 1877 – after 1881), David (1882–1888) RG 11/5034 f53 p43; OYSA (1971); Bryan Morland (n.d. [mid 1970s]) The Families of John Coleby Morland 18651940 and Elizabeth Jane Bracher 18691945
1881 secretary—collier coy / mine scriver, of 13 Oxford Terrace, Gateshead, Durham, living with his wife, son, brother-in-law, and a general servant RG 11/5034 f53 p43
1890 emigrated to USA Year: 1920, Census Place: Jacksonville Ward 10, Duval, Florida, Roll: T625_218; Page: 6A; Enumeration District: 67, Image: 947, Year: 1930, Census Place: Jacksonville, Duval, Florida, Roll: 314, Page: 13A, Enumeration District: 53, Image: 417.0
1891-09-28 arrived at New York, from Liverpool, on the Arizona; destination Pittsburgh New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957
1900 auditor, provision, living with his wife in a rented house at 238 State Street, Borough of Queens, New York City, Queens County, New York 1900 United States Federal Census
1914-10-18 arrived back at New York; accountant, of Jacksonville, Florida; with his wife, had visited 54 Front St, Tynemouth, then left via Liverpool on the New York New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957
1915 naturalised Year: 1920, Census Place: Jacksonville Ward 10, Duval, Florida, Roll: T625_218; Page: 6A; Enumeration District: 67, Image: 947, Year: 1930, Census Place: Jacksonville, Duval, Florida, Roll: 314, Page: 13A, Enumeration District: 53, Image: 417.0
1920 accountant in a packing company, worker, living with his wife in freehold property at Riverside Ave, Precinct 10, Jacksonville City, Florida, USA Year: 1920;Census Place: Jacksonville Ward 10, Duval, Florida; Roll: T625_218; Page: 6A; Enumeration District: 67; Image: 947
  auditor to Kingan & Co., New York, of Jacksonville, Florida, USA OYSA (1971)
1930 auditor, wholesale meat co., living with his wife in Herschell St, Jacksonville City, Duval, Florida, USA; owned own home, worth $9000 Year: 1930, Census Place: Jacksonville, Duval, Florida; Roll: 314, Page: 13A, Enumeration District: 53, Image: 417.0
1935 of 2976 Herschell Street, Jacksonville, Florida, auditor to Kingan and Co., New York (retd); followed his profession in New York for 42 years; regrets the "deadness" of Friends' Meetings which he attended in his young manhood, and the lack of spiritual instruction for young people; interests—astronomy Edgar B. Collinson, ed. (1935) Bootham School Register
1936-01-26 d. Baltimore, Maryland, USA OYSA (1971); Bootham magazine


 03. Elizabeth Spence (Lillie)

1847-11-09 b. North Shields, Northumberland censuses; Joseph Foster (1871) Pedigrees of the Forsters and Fosters of the North of England. Privately printed
1851 draper's daur, of Howard Street (east side), Tynemouth, Northumberland, living with her family, two journeymen draper's assistants, two draper's apprentices, a cook, and two housemaids TNA: PRO HO 107/2410 f165 p55
1861 not found in census  
1861-08/1863-12 of North Shields; at Mount School, York The Mount School, York. List of Teachers and Scholars 1784–1816, 1831–1906. 1906, York: Sessions
1864-06-28 of North Shields Mosscroft visitors' book
1865-02-15 of Chirton
1869-05-12 of Chirton Cottage
1869-05-20 m. Robert Coltman Clephan (1839–1922, iron merchant, s. of Joseph and Mary Clephan), Tynemouth RD censuses; Foster (1871); The Mount School, York. List of Teachers and Scholars 1784–1816, 1831–1906. 1906; Royal Armouries; GRO index

FASHIONABLE WEDDING.—Yesterday morning, the village of Whitley was quite gay on the occasion of the marriage of Mr. Robert Coltman Clephan, son of Mr. Joseph Clephan, of Grove House, Gateshead, to Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Mr. J.F. Spence, of Chirton Cottage. The wedding was celebrated in St. Paul's Church, and the officiating clergyman was the Rev. R.F. Wheeler, the vicar.

Newcastle Daily Chronicle, 1869-05-21
1869-12-22 of Bensham Mosscroft visitors' book
Children: Hugh Spence (1870–1953), Mary (1871–1952), Constance (1873–1965), Katherine (1876–1960), James (cal 1877 – after 1926), Elaine (1878–1938), Josephine (1881 – after 1952), John Foster S. (1883–1886), Dorothy Foster (1885–1947), Robert Carslogie (1887 – after 1971), Guy (1888–1980), Edwin (1894–1894) censuses; GRO index; National Probate Calendar; Foster (1871); OYSA (1971); Pennyghael
1871 of White House, Birtley, Durham, living with her husband, son, mother-in-law, a nurse, and a general servant PRO RG 10/4993 f29 p8
1881 of White House, Birtley, living with her family, nurse, house maid, under nurse, and a cook RG 11/4983 f31 p10
1883-07-04 with her husband, present at her brother's wedding, at Middlesbrough fmh York Herald, 1883-07-05
1890-06-20 with her husband, present at the presentation of the freedom of the city of Newcastle to Mr H.M. Stanley Newcastle Courant, 1890-06-21
1891 of South Dene Tower, Gateshead, Durham, living with her family, mother-in-law, a nurse, an under nurse, a cook, and a housemaid RG 12/4185 f124 p42
1901 of South Dene Tower, Gateshead, living with her family, three grandchildren, a cook, a sowing maid [sic], two housemaids, and a nursemaid RG 13/4760 f149 p2
1901-07-24 with her husband, among the mourners at her father's funeral in Tynemouth Shields Daily Gazette, 1901-07-25
1907-02-06 of Tynemouth; with her husband, inherited £100 under the will of Edwin Clephan, of Leicester Leicester Daily Post
1911 not found in census  
1914 Q3 d. Tynemouth RD GRO index


 04. Henry Corder Spence

1849-12-01 b. North Shields, Northumberland censuses; Joseph Foster (1871) Pedigrees of the Forsters and Fosters of the North of England. Privately printed
1851 draper's son, of Howard Street (east side), Tynemouth, Northumberland, living with his family, two journeymen draper's assistants, two draper's apprentices, a cook, and two housemaids TNA: PRO HO 107/2410 f165 p55
1861 scholar, of Chirton Cottage, Chirton, Tynemouth, living with his family and two house servants PRO RG 9/3838 f32 p2
1861/1866 at Bootham School, York Old York Scholars' Association (1971) Bootham School Register. London: Oyez Press
  apprentice at Scarborough; at Barrow and then Bristol Edgar B. Collinson, ed. (1935) Bootham School Register
1871 grocer's assistant, in household of William Cole, of 36 Corn Street, St Ewens, Bristol, Gloucestershire RG 10/2522 f151 p16
1872 to N. Shields Collinson, ed. (1935)
1877-03-19 a life brigade for Sunderland set up after a public meeting in the Royal Rink, Toward-Road, which had been called after H.C. Spence gave a talk on Life Brigades to the Salem Young Men's Mutual Improvement Association; elected to its committee Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1877-03-20
1877-04-28 of North Shields; m. Lydia Brison (1852–1953, d. of Robert and Mary Ann Brison, of Bishopston, near Bristol), at St Michael & All Angels, Bishopston censuses; The Friend; Wedmore; National Probate Calendar
Children: Violet Mary (1878–1964), Robert Foster (1880–1927), Cuthbert Kemys (1885–1918), Gladys Ethelwyn (1886–1971), John Foster (1893–1918) censuses; GRO index; OYSA (1971); Wedmore; Australian electoral rolls; Edgar B. Collinson, ed. (1935) Bootham School Register
1881 buyer, shipstore, of 16 Linskill Ter., Tynemouth, living with his family and a general servant RG 11/5081 f83 p6
1883-07-04 with his wife, present at his brother's wedding, at Middlesbrough fmh York Herald, 1883-07-05
1891 manager of ships store, employed, of 16 Linskill Ter., Tynemouth, living with his family and a general servant RG 12/4229 f24 p4
1891-10-28 hon. treasurer of the Northumberland Park Bowling Club Shields Daily Gazette, 1891-10-29
1893-04-07 elected to represent the parishioners, at the annual vestry meeting of St Peter's Church, North Shields Newcastle Journal, 1893-04-13
1896-04-08 hon. treasurer of the Northumberland Park Bowling Club Shields Daily Gazette, 1896-04-09
1899-04-12 Shields Daily Gazette, 1899-04-13
1901 ship store merchant, of 2 Lovaine Ter., Preston, Tynemouth, living with his family and two general servants RG 13/4801 f160 p67
1901-04-19 at the vestry meeting of St Peter's church, North Shields, elected a sidesman, and re-appointed as one of two representatives of the congregation at the Ruri-Decanal Conference Shields Daily Gazette, 1901-04-20
1901-07-24 with his wife, among the mourners at his father's funeral in Tynemouth Shields Daily Gazette, 1901-07-25
1901-08-15 ship store merchant, of 2 Lovaine Terrace, North Shields; nominated as a candidate for election to the County Council Shields Daily News, 1901-08-15
1901-08-23 contested the Tynemouth No. 4 Electoral Division for the County Council; came second of two, with 303 votes Shields Daily Gazette, 1901-08-24
1902-01-16 one of the MCs at the annual ball of the North Shields Habitation of the Primrose League, at the Albion Assembly Rooms Shields Daily News, 1902-01-17
1904-05-16 played for Northumberland Park in a bowls match against Percy, scoring 16 shots Shields Daily Gazette, 1904-05-17
1904-08-17 at the exhibition of the Borough of Tynemouth and South Northumberland Floral and Horticultural Society, at the Cricket Field at Preston Avenue, North Shields, won a prize for cut flowers Shields Daily News
1905-11-27 with his wife, present at a whist drive and dance held by the North Shields Primrose League, at Percy Hall Shields Daily News, 1905-11-28
1906-02-20 in the absence of the mayor, presided at the annual meeting of the Tynemouth and South Northumberland Floral and Horticultural Society, at the Town Hall Buildings Shields Daily News, 1906-02-21
1907-03-08 at the meeting of the licensing magistrates at the Police Court, North Shields:

Mr Henry Corder Spence, grocer and ship store merchant, carrying on business at 28 Prudhoe Street, applied for an additional excise license to sell by retail spirits to be consumed off the premises.

The Chairman said the justices were willing to grant him a license similar to the one they had granted to Mr Anderson.

Mr Spence said he already held such a license. He wished to be allowed to sell spirits in single bottles.

The Chairman said they could not entertain the application, and it would therefore be refused.

Shields Daily News
1911 ship store dealer, own account, living with his wife at 17 Alma Place, North Shields; 7 rooms RG14PN30755 RG78PN1758 RD559 SD2 ED23 SN21
1912-05-14 a long letter to the editor, from the Brigade's current secretary, highlighting H.C. Spence's significant role in the establishing of the Sunderland Life Brigade in 1877 Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette
  provision merchant, of North Shields OYSA (1971)
1915-11-02

THE EXPORTATION OF RUBBER TYRES.

Charges Against a North Shields Ship Store Merchant.

HEAVY FINES IMPOSED.

Before Mr Nesbitt, presiding, and Mr J.R. Stewart, at the Newcastle Police Court, today, Henry Corder Spence, of Alma Place, North Shields, a well-known ships' store merchant, was summoned on four informations for having brought to Newcastle Quay for shipment to Norway, per the steamship Irma, on the 26th July, per the steamships Vega and Haakon VII., on the 30th July, and per the steamship Mira, on the 31st July, all Norwegian mail and passenger steamers, certain rubber tyres, being goods prohibited to all destinations abroad other than British possessions and protectorates, by Royal proclamation.

There were four further summonses against the defendant, charging him in each of the above cases with having as the shipper failed to pre-enter the goods in question.

M. A.F. Hubbard, of London, prosecuted on behalf of Mr Sheridan, the Collector of H.M. Customs, Newcastle; and T.H. Smirk represented the defendant, who pleaded not guilty.

Mr Hubbard, in his opening statement, said these proceedings had arisen out of proceedings that were taken in that court in August last, in which five defendants were charged with the export of rubber tyres. A question was then raised in court as to whether any action would be taken against those who had assisted in procuring the tyres in Newcastle. At that time they had not gone fully into the matter, but they had done so since, and these proceedings were the outcome. Mr Spence, the defendant, was 66 years of age, and was formerly a ship store merchant in a large way of business. Latterly his business had been confined to obtaining orders and supplying ship stores on commission. On the date of the first information, July 26th, defendant went to the premises of Messrs Russell and Sons, Ltd., leather and rubber merchants, Westgate Road, saw the manager, Mr Kendall, and asked to purchase some rubber motor tyres. Mr Kendall asked him if it was a bona-fide transaction, and he replied in the affirmative, stating that he was purchasing for the managing director of a steamship company, owners of mail boats at Bergen, who had 50 motor cars held up there for want of tyres. On the strength of that conversation, Mr Kendall sold him five motor tyres for £28 18s. Defendant gave instructions that these tyres were to be sent down to the Norwegian steamer Irma. The tyres, accordingly, were sent down to the vessel, and the evidence would show that defendant was on board when they shipped. On the 30th July he again went to Russell's, and purchased four motor tyres, ordering two to be sent on board the Vaga and two on board the Haakon VII. For these the price was £22 10s, defendant paying £9 10s down, and the balance being collected on board the Vega. When these tyres were delivered Mr Spence was on board the Vega. On the 31st July, the collector of Customs, having got word that something of this kind was going on, took certain measures in conjunction with the police, and a watch was kept on board the steamship Mira. On that day defendant again went to Russell's and purchased seven more tyres at a cost of £38 10s, and gave instructions they were to be sent to the Mira. These were packed in a case, taken down to the vessel and handed over to Mr Spence, who was on deck at the time. A Customs officer, who was keeping watch, asked what the case contained. Mr Spence said he did not know, but the cook on being asked the same question, replied that it contained ship's provisions. Mr Spence asked the officer to get the Customs seal to seal up some ship's stores, this evidently being done with the object of getting rid of him. The officer went away, but returned shortly afterwards, when he found the case had disappeared. It was ultimately found underneath a staircase in the 'tween decks, and that fact was then revealed that it contained rubber tyres. Mr Spence was still on board the vessel, and he then said to the officer, "I am sorry; I wish had made a clean breast of it. The reason I said I knew nothing about the case was to save the other chaps on board the ship." On the question of responsibility, defendant, as s ship store merchant, would be perfectly well aware of the shipping formalities that were necessary to be observed in a case of this kind. He had also held Privy Council licenses himself. There was no doubt to some extent he was under the influence of those for whom he was acting on board the different ships, because if they chose to take the ship's business away from him they could do so. But, Mr Hubbard submitted, whatever duresse he was under he ought to have advised them that the shipment could have been obtained under Privy Council license.

Evidence was given in support of the charges.

Mr Smirk, for the defence, withdrew his plea of not guilty, which he said he had made merely for the purpose of ascertaining certain facts. Undoubtedly there was an offence, and he was satisfied his client would have to be convicted. Looking at the case as it stood, it might be thought Mr Spence was making a lot of money out of these transactions, but he wished to assure them to the contrary. In the first case he admitted he did receive 5 per cent. for his trouble, but in the case of the Vega he lost £3, and in the case of the Mira he lost £10 through the members of the crew for whom he purchased the tyres leaving the ship, and in the case of the Haakon VII. he made no profit at all. In these cases Mr Spence was only acting as a sort of agent for members of the crew of the vessels concerned, and only did so in order to oblige them. He had lived in North Shields all his life, and was a highly respectable and respected man very well connected. He could call evidence as to character as necessary. He was certainly not a man who would knowingly do anything to harm his country. He asked the Bench to deal with him as leniently as possible.

The magistrates' clerk (Mr J.R. Roberts) pointed out that defendant had rendered himself liable to penalties amounting in all to £2,400, and to be sent to prison for two years.

The Chairman said the Bench regarded this as a very serious case. Defendant had acted as an intermediary between the sailors and those from whom the goods were purchased. However, in view of all the circumstances, they were going to treat him as leniently as possible. He would be fined £10 in each of the four cases of bringing prohibited goods to the quay for export, and £5 in each of the four cases of failing to make pre-entry, or £60 altogether, with the alternative of 25 days.

Shields Daily News
1921-01-27 of 17 Alma-place, North Shields; partnership with Joseph Clemans Barnes, trading as ship chandlers at North Shields as H.C. Spence & Co., dissolved as from 31 December 1920, Spence solely succeeding to business The London Gazette
1933-07-06 wife of 17 Alma Place at the date of her death Shields Daily News, 1933-07-07
1935 a Good Templar Collinson, ed. (1935)
1936-12-12 d. 5 Lyncroft Road, North Shields GRO index; OYSA (1971); Newcastle Journal, 1936-12-14

MR H.C. SPENCE

Former Mayor of Tynemouth.

Mr Henry Corder Spence, who died at 5, Lyncroft Road, North Shields, on Saturday, at the age of 87 years, was one of the three sons of the late Alderman John Foster Spence, who, together with his brother, Alderman Joseph Spence, was a prominent figure in the public life of North Shields in the Victorian era. Both were ex-Mayors of Tynemouth.

For many years the late Mr Henry Corder Spence carried on business as a ship chandler in the Bull Ring, North Shields, retiring about 20 years ago. Although descending from old Quaker and Liberal stock, he was a Conservative, and formerly took part in many of the social activities connected with the local Conservative Party. He had been in a poor state of health for many years.

Newcastle Journal, 1936-12-14
1936-12-14T14:00 bur. Christ Church, North Shields; "No Flowers. No mourning." Newcastle Journal, 1936-12-14


 05. Edward Spence

1851-08-28 b. Chirton, Northumberland Joseph Foster (1871) Pedigrees of the Forsters and Fosters of the North of England. Privately printed
1851-09-21 d. Chirton


06. Alfred Spence

1853-02-23 b. Chirton Cottage, Northumberland GRO index; Annual Monitor; Joseph Foster (1871) Pedigrees of the Forsters and Fosters of the North of England. Privately printed
1855 Q3 of North Shields; d. Chirton, Northumberland Annual Monitor; GRO index


07. Robert Foster Spence, JP

1855-01-31 b. Chirton, Northumberland censuses; Joseph Foster (1871) Pedigrees of the Forsters and Fosters of the North of England. Privately printed; Old York Scholars' Association (1971) Bootham School Register. London: Oyez Press
1861 scholar, of Chirton Cottage, Chirton, Tynemouth, Northumberland, living with his family and two house servants TNA: PRO RG 9/3838 f32 p2
1866/1871 at Bootham School, York OYSA (1971)
1871 scholar, of 20 Bootham, York, Yorkshire RG 10/4744 f47 p35
1873-07-07

ASSAULTING A MAGISTRATE.—At the North Shields Police Court yesterday, James Osborn, pitman, Harton Colliery, South Shields, was charged with violently assaulting Mr John Foster Spence, one of the borough of Tynemouth magistrates, and also his son, Mr R.F. Spence. On Saturday night a considerable disturbance took place at Cherton, where Mr Spence resides, caused by the defendant and some others. A fight ensued, and on Mr Spence and his son interfering, they were violently assaulted by the defendant, who struck them severely with a stick of the head and face. The magistrates committed Osborn to Morpeth Gaol for one month.

Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer, 1873-07-08
1876 Q2 m. 1. Mary Soulsby (cal 1858 – 1880), at Newcastle upon Tyne RO GRO index; Marriage Locator
1877-02-26 First Class Certificate of Competency as a Manager of Mines granted under the Coal Mines Regulation Acts, 1872 and 1887 (35 & 36 Vict. Cap. 76, Sec. 30 ; 50 & 51 Vict. Cap. 58, Sec 23.); certificate number 978 (1st) Durham Mining Museum
1878-11-02 elected as member of the North of England Institute of Mining and Mechanical Engineers; student, of Cramlington
1880-09-07 wife d. at West Cramlington Shields Daily Gazette, 1880-09-09
1881 colliery manager, living with a housekeeper at 9 Quality Row, Cramlington, Northumberland RG 11/5094 f114 p4
1882 manager, West Cramlington colliery Durham Mining Museum
1883-07-04 m. 2. Maria Dunning (1856–1943, of Middlesbrough, d. of John and Priscilla Dunning), at Middlesbrough fmh, Yorkshire censuses; GRO index; The Friend; The British Friend; Edward H. Milligan (2007) Biographical Dictionary of British Quakers in Commerce and Industry 1775–1920. York: Sessions Book Trust

FRIENDS' WEDDING AT MIDDLESBRO'.—Yesterday morning, at the Friends' Meeting-house, the marriage of Miss Maria Dunning, second daughter of Ald. John Dunning, of Middlesbro', to Mr. Robt. Spence, colliery manager, of West Cramlington, son of Mr. John Foster Spence, draper, North Shields, was celebrated. The bridesmaids were Miss Sharp, Miss May Spence, Miss Edith Evans, and Miss May Clephan. The bride was dressed in a cream Ottoman silk, with wreath and veil. After the ceremony a grand breakfast was partaken of at the residence of the bride's father at Southfield Villas, the newly-married couple afterwards leaving for Blanchland. The wedding party comprised Ald. and Mrs. Dunning, Mr. J.F. Spence, Miss Fayle, Mr. and Mrs. R.C. Clephan, Mr. and Hrs. H.C. Spence, Mr. and Mrs. Tweedie, Mr. and Mrs. Hjerbig, Mr. and Mrs. A. Wadham, and Mrs. J.J. Sparks, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin F. James, Mr. Jas. Watson, Miss A.C. Spence, Mr. W. Dunning, Miss Swann, Mr. T.W. Dunning, Miss E.L. Fayle, Mr. F. Spence, Mr. J.T. Dunning, Mr. A.H. Dunning, and Mr. H.S. Clephan.

York Herald, 1883-07-05
Children: Alwyn Foster (1884–1948), Erica (1885–1980), Ronald (1886–1955), all b. West Cramlington; and Max Thompson (1888–1902) censuses; GRO index; Annual Monitor; National Probate Calendar; OYSA (1971); Milligan (2007) Newcastle Courant; Morpeth Herald, 1885-06-27
1884 manager, West Cramlington colliery Durham Mining Museum
1888 manager, Backworth, Maude Pit; Beadnell; and West Cramlington collieries; member, North of England Institute of Mining and Mechanical Engineers; of Cramlington
1889/1890 of Cramlington; member, Institute of Mining Engineers
1890 manager, Backworth, Maude Pit; and West Cramlington collieries
1890-04-12 returned unopposed, as Guardian for Backworth Township Shields Daily News
1891 colliery manager, employed, of Backworth Cottage, Backworth, Northumberland, living with his family, a governess, a nursemaid, and a cook, with his sister visiting RG 12/4234 f68 p4
1892/1893 of Backworth; member, Institute of Mining Engineers Durham Mining Museum
1893-04-11 colliery manager, of Backworth; returned unopposed, as Guardian for Backworth Shields Daily News
1894-12-08 manager of the West Cramlington Coal Company; opened the West Cramlington Mechanics' Institute Newcastle Courant, 1894-12-15
1894-12-15 colliery manager; elected as Tynemouth Union guardian and rural councillor for Backworth Shields Daily Gazette, 1894-12-17
1896 manager, Backworth "Blue Bell"; Backworth "C"; Maude; Blue Bell Backworth; Earsdon Church; and West Cramlington collieries Durham Mining Museum
1897/1898 of Backworth; member, Institute of Mining Engineers
1898-05-27 manager of the Backworth Collieries Morpeth Herald, 1898-05-28
1898-07-23 of North Shields Bensham Grove visitors' books
1899-04-05 president of the Backworth Workmen's Institute Morpeth Herald, 1899-04-08
1900-04-02 colliery manager, of Backworth; elected to Earsdon Urban Council as a member for Backworth Ward Shields Daily News, 1900-04-04
1900-10-27 colliery viewer, Backworth; a subscriber for the Workmen's Club for Backworth Morpeth Herald
1901-03-07 nominated to the Tynemouth Board of Guardians, for Backworth Shields Daily Gazette, 1901-03-07
1901 mining engineer, worker, of Backworth Lodge, Backworth, living with his wife and son, a cook, and a housemaid RG 13/4810 f47 p9
1901-09-03 with J. Wallace, both of Backworth Collieries, had patented Rope grips (patent 7748): "The rope is gripped between the horn fixed on the spindle and the fluted conical eccentric roller." Berwickshire News and General Advertiser
1902 manager, Backworth "Algernon"; Backworth "Blue Bell"; Backworth "Maude"; Blue Bell Backworth; and Earsdon Church collieries Durham Mining Museum
1902-10-02 re miners' homes at Backworth:

[ . . . ] Mr R.F. Spence, agent of the Backworth Collieries, has lent the weight of his influence in favour of the scheme. Mr. Spence is a gentleman who takes the most lively interest in the well-being of his work-people, and has given practical demonstration of that interest, and with such an advocate there need be no fear but that the proposed Backworth Homes for aged people will be as successful as several other of the thriving institutions which Backworth can boast.

Morpeth Herald
1903-10-01 of Backworth; appointed Chairman of the Tynemouth Board of Guardians Shields Daily Gazette, 1903-10-02
1903-11-07 elected president of the Nursing Association for Backworth Collieries Morpeth Herald, 1903-11-14
1903-12-14 represented the Backworth Coal Co. at the inquest on a Backworth miner Morpeth Herald, 1903-12-19
1904-02-28 mining engineer, of Backworth Lodge; nominated for election to Northumberland County Council from Backworth Shields Daily News, 1904-03-01
1904-03-10 had beaten his only competitor for the Council election by 51 votes Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer
1904-05-05 mining engineer; had been re-elected chairman of the Tynemouth Board of Guardians Shields Daily Gazette
1905-02-04 president of the Backworth Band, which had recently won the Championship Cup of the Durham and Northumberland Band Society Morpeth Herald, 1905-02-11
1906-04-11 chairman of the Tynemouth Board of Guardians Shields Daily Gazette, 1906-04-12
1907-02-23 with another, had patented "apparatus for conveying coal or other minerals in mines or otherwise" Sheffield Evening Telegraph
1907-05-04 presided at the opening cemetery for the new pavilion for Backworth Cricket Club Morpeth Herald, 1907-05-11
1907/1908 of Backworth; member, Institute of Mining Engineers Durham Mining Museum
1909-03-18 colliery agent, of Backworth; nominated for election to Earsdon Urban Council, from Backworth Ward Morpeth Herald, 1909-03-20
1909-04-10

At Earsdon Mr. R.F. Spence is likely to be again elected. His big majority at the election shows he maintains a good hold on the popularity of the district.

Morpeth Herald
1910-08-18 with his wife, present at the wedding of Sarah Spence and Guy Clephan Newcastle Journal, 1910-08-19
1911 mining engineer, mining, worker, of Backworth, Newcastle on Tyne, Northumberland, living with his wife, son, two domestic servants, and a visitor; 11 rooms RG14PN30796 RG78PN1760 RD559 SD4 ED2 SN23
1911-10-08 re re-employment of Ruskin College students at Backworth:

Mr. Robert F. Spence, the colliery manager, when invited to explain the company's position, denied that there was any feeling on the part of the management respecting the college or its students; but he held that the owners were under no obligation to re-employ any man after leaving the company's service for a prolonged period, and that they were prepared to exercise their own judgment on such matters.

London Daily News, 1911-10-09
1912-04-01 top of the poll in Backworth Ward, at the Council election, with 265 votes Morpeth Herald, 1912-04-05
1912-04-22 elected vice-chairman of the Tynemouth Board of Guardians Newcastle Daily Chronicle, 1912-04-23
1913-03-17 of The Lodge, Backworth; elected as alderman Newcastle Evening Chronicle
1914-09-05 chaired a recruiting meeting at Backworth cricket field Morpeth Herald, 1914-09-11
1915 of Backworth Lodge, Newcastle-on-Tyne AOSA Annual Report 35, 1916
1917-01-02 chairman of Earsdon Council Blyth News, 1917-01-04
1919/1920 of Backworth; member, Institute of Mining Engineers Durham Mining Museum
1921 agent, Backworth "Algernon"; Backworth "Eccles" and "Maude"; Backworth "Prosperous"; East Holywell; and Earsdon Church collieries
1921-09-24

ALDERMAN SPENCE.

Half Century of Service with Coal Company.

PRESENTATION AT BACKWORTH.

The Backworth Institute Hall was filled with an enthusiastic company on Saturday afternoon on the occasion of a presentation to Ald. R.F. Spence, who has completed 50 years' service with the Backworth Coal Coy.

Alderman T. Taylor of Chipchase Castle, Chairman of the Northumberland Coal-Owners' Association, presided and was supported by Alderman and Mrs Spence, Mr A. Spence, Mr and Mrs Henderson Gibson, Coucillor T. Dodds, Mr and Mrs Wm Bickerton, Mr. R.O. Brown, Newbiggin Collieries; Mr and Mrs G. Clephan, East Holywell; Mr James Anderson, Mr and Mrs W. Thompson, Major Streatfield, Councillor G. Kedge, Mr David Hardie, Mr R.F. Latimer, Mr R.S. Anderson, and Mr G. Brandon.

Mr Taylor said it was with the greatest possible pleasure that he accepted the invitation to be present that afternoon to preside over a meeting in honour of his old and valued friend Ald. Spence. (Applause). Personally, he had not now the opportunity of getting down to the collieries with which he was associated as in the old days. The business had gravitated to Newcastle, and most of the work in connection with the collieries, as far as workmen and owners were concerned, was done at the Coal Trade Offices.

MR SPENCE'S RECORD.

Mr Spence went to serve his apprenticeship with Mr Richardson at the Backworth and East Holywell Collieries on Sept. 7, 1871. He passed his examination as manager in 1876. In 1880 he was appointed manager at West Cramlington, and in 1882 Backworth Maude Pit was placed under his charge. In 1892 he was made manager of the Church Pit and, in addition was appointed manager of the Shiremoor pits when they were purchased by the Backworth owners. In 1902 he was made assistant to Mr Richardson, and when Mr Richardson retired he was made chief viewer. (Applause.) He had a record extending over 50 years of good and faithful service. Mr Spence had not only done his very best for the owners of the colliery, but had made himself popular amongst the workmen. (Applause.)

It was most gratifying to know that the presentation was a joint one from the workmen and owners. It showed that the old kindly feeling between workmen and employers was not dead in Northumberland. He hoped that feeling would last forever in Northumberland, and never get into such a condition that the owners would look upon the men as machines. If the coal trade had to revive in the future—they were passing through troubled times just now—it would be through the cordial co-operation of workmen and owners to bring trade back to this country. (Applause)

THE PRESENTATION.

Mr James Anderson, a retired workman, made the presentation. He had known Mr Spence for about 46 years, he said, and he had always had the best of feelings towards his workmen. He handed to Mr Spence a silver tray, and silver tea and coffee service. The tray bore the following inscription:—"Presented to Robert Foster Spence by the owners, officials and workmen of the Backworth and East Holywell Collieries as a mark of esteem on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of his connection with these colliers. Sept 7, 1921." Ald. Spence also received a cheque for £400, and Mrs Spence also a crocodile leather dressing case.

Major Streatfield, speaking on behalf of the owners, said they all knew what Mr Spence had to do in organisation of representing the owners on the one hand, and dealing fairly with the men on the other. (Applause) They all felt he had ably fulfilled that double duty. Good feeling was necessary to restore the commercial position of our country to what it used to be and what it must be again.

Ald. Spence said he did not know how to thank them. He was very much obliged to them all and thanked them from the bottom of his heart.

Mr William Ogle, moving a vote of thanks to Ald Taylor, said they were in a slump at present, and it was the duty of all to sink antagonism as far as possible, and display a spirit of good will. Only out of goodwill could they recover their position, and get back to a state of prosperity.

Councillor Dodds seconded, and the vote was accorded.

Shields Daily News, 1921-09-26
1922-03-16 mining engineer, of Backworth; retiring as a Poor Law guardian Shields Daily News
1923/1925 agent, Backworth "Algernon"; Backworth "Eccles" and "Maude"; Backworth "Prosperous"; East Holywell; and Earsdon Church collieries Durham Mining Museum
1924-03-11

ALD. R.F. SPENCE.

30 Years Public Service in Earsdon

The splendid public work of Alderman R.F. Spence for a period of over thirty years, was eulogised at a pleasant ceremony which preceded the usual business at the Earsdon Council last night, when Mr J.R. McMillen, surveyor, handed to the Council a photograph of Alderman Spence.

Mr McMillen, in handing over the photograph, said he wished he could express in words what he was thinking. As they knew they had been very fortunate in the matter of chairmanship. They had had only two, Mrs Spence and the present chairman, during the life of the Council. He could say without hesitation that he was one of the most courteous and sympathetic gentlemen he had ever met. It was 34 years ago that he was appointed a workman under the Tynemouth Rural Council, and Mr Spence then extended the same courtesy as he did now.

It would be a sorry day for the district if any thing occurred that would necessitate Mr Spence giving up the management of the important Backworth Collieries, and he had heard it mentioned that if Mr Spence had controlled the mining affairs of Northumberland and Durham there would have been fewer disputes.

A MUCH IMPROVED DISTRICT.

When the Earsdon area was carved out of the Tynemouth Rural District Council they inherited some not very good legacies, but now they could claim to have tried to make the district a little better then they found it, and they could now compare very favourably with any district in Northumberland for sewerage, roads, lighting, scavenging, water and housing. He thought a great deal of social unrest in the country was due to the conditions in which people lived.

The chairman (Coun. R. Allan), in accepting the photograph said that Mr Spence could claim a comradeship around the Council Board second to none. During the time he had sat as a councillor under the chairmanship of Alderman Spence it was an education to him. He wished to associate himself with the warm feeling Mr McMillan had expressed, and he hoped the future would spare Mr and Mrs Spence all the blessings possible.

Councillor J.W. Thompson, vice-chairman and manage of the East Holywell Colliery, said it was 54 years since he first became acquainted with Mr Spence, and always found him to be a very capable man, and he joined in wishing Mr and Mrs Spence a long and happy life.

In reply Alderman Spence said he had only tried to do what was fair, and he was sure that Coun. Allan was carrying on in the same way himself, and was proving an admirable chairman. He thanked Mr McMillen for the gift.

Shields Daily News, 1924-03-12
1925-03-30

The "Father of the Board."

There was a time when the "Father" of a Board of Guardians, or any other public authority, who had a record of anything like 38 years of unbroken service to his credit, would not have been allowed to pass into retirement without some tangible recognition of his work. The verbal tribute, which was paid at last week's meeting of the Tynemouth Board of Guardians, in reference to the retirement of County Alderman Robert Foster Spence, the "father of the Board," who has represented the Backworth district in the Councils of the Union for 38 consecutive years, seemed very inadequate in itself to mark the event. There will not be many Guardians, taking the whole country over, who can boast a longer association with Poor Law administration than that of Ald. Spence, and to be the "father" of the Tynemouth Board is no small distinction in the Poor Law world. Ald. Spence was first elected as a Guardian in March, 1887, about a month after the appointment of Mr Sep Scott (who retired in 1910) as Clerk of the Board. He was chairman from 1903 to 1905, inclusive, a period of three years, and has been chairman of the Union Assessment Committee for the last nine years, having succeeded the late Colonel Jobling, of Bebside, on that gentleman's death in 1916. Ald. Spence, who is the manager of the well-known Backworth group of collieries, is a son of the late Ald. John Foster Spence, and a native of North Shields.

Shields Daily News
1925-04-01

Mr. R.F. Spence, consulting engineer, stated at the scene of the pit disaster in Newcastle yesterday that only by a miracle could any of the entombed men be alive, but miracles did happen and miners had survived a long time in similar circumstances to this disaster. It was conceivable that the men might have reached a stage where they could hang on. Hope could not be finally abandoned till the dead bodies were found.

Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 1925-04-02
1926-01-27

The Ministry of Mines inquiry into the Montague Pit disaster at Scotswood was resumed at Newcastle to-day.

Robert Foster Spence, consulting engineer to the owners of the colliery, stated that he did not know of the existence of the old workings from which the water came in.

[article continues, but without further reference to RFS]

Hartlepool Northern Daily Mail
1927 agent, East Holywell colliery Durham Mining Museum
shortly before 1928-05-01 had been re-elected president of the Backworth, Earsdon, and District Nursing Association Newcastle Journal
1929/1930 agent, East Holywell colliery Durham Mining Museum
  Chairman of Earsdon Urban District Council for 21 years; Alderman of Northumberland County Council Edgar B. Collinson, ed. (1935) Bootham School Register
1932-09-16 of 28 Hawthorne Road, Gosforth, Newcastle upon Tyne; d. there National Probate Calendar; OYSA (1971); Milligan (2007)

DEATH OF ALD. R.F. SPENCE

A Well Known Colliery Viewer

The death took place suddenly yesterday, at Hawthorn Road, Gosforth, of County-Alderman Robert Foster Spence, who for many years resided at The Lodge, Backworth.

Mr Spence, who was 77, was the son of the late Alderman John Foster Spence, of Chirton, North Shields, who was several times Mayor of the Borough of Tynemouth. He was a colliery viewer, and was for over 60 years with the Backworth Coal Company, of which he was appointed secretary two years ago. He took a keen interest in local affairs, and was for many years a member of the Earsdon Urban District Council, and had the unique distinction of sitting as chairman for 21 successive years.

He was a Justice of the Peace for Northumberland, and was chairman of the Mental Deficiency Committee for Northumberland. In politics he was a staunch Conservative and a prominent member of the Newcastle Club. He is survived by a widow, one son and one daughter. The interment will take place on Monday at Preston Cemetery, North Shields.

Shields Daily News, 1932-09-17
1932-09-19

MR R.F. SPENCE LAID TO REST

Funeral at Preston Cemetery

There was a large and representative attendance at the funeral at Preston Cemetery, yesterday, of County-Alderman Robert Foster Spence.

[ . . . ]

The graveside service was conducted by Mr Mowbray Thompson, of the Society of Friends, in the usual simple manner observed by the Society.

The principal mourners were:—Mr Henry Corder Spence (brother), Mr. A E Spence (son), Mrs E Gubb (daughter), Mr Forster Redfern (grandson), Miss May Spence (sister), Mss G Spence (niece), and Mrs Hilda Tweedy (niece.

[those present included representatives of the Backworth Workmen's Club, mining associations, old employees of Backworth Colliery, former employees of the Spence family, the Backworth Coal Co., Broomhills Collieries, various other collieries, the North of England Institute of Mining and Mechanical Engineers, the Northumberland Coal Owners' Association, the Northumberland Association of Colliery Managers, local government associations, Northumberland Mental Hospital Board and the County Committee for the Care of the Mentally Defective, and a good number of other individuals named]

Shields Daily News, 1932-09-20
1932-11-28 will proved at Newcastle by son Alwyn Foster Spence and daughter Erica Grubb; effects £2832 15s. National Probate Calendar
net personalty £2087 Shields Daily News, 1932-12-22


08. Mary Emma Spence

1857-02-24 of Chirton, Northumberland censuses; Joseph Foster (1871) Pedigrees of the Forsters and Fosters of the North of England. Privately printed
1861 scholar, of Chirton Cottage, Chirton, Tynemouth, Northumberland, living with family and two house servants TNA: PRO RG 9/3838 f32 p2
1871 scholar, boarder, of Polam Hall, St Cuthbert, Darlington, Durham RG 10/4883 f5 p4
1881 draper's daughter, of 5 Chirton Cottages, Chirton, Northumberland, living with her family, mother's companion, a cook, and a housemaid RG 11/5076 f48 p1
by 1884-09-20 had successfully completed a course of lectures on chemistry, through the University Extension scheme Shields Daily Gazette, 1884-09-22
by 1887-02-02 had successfully completed a course of lectures at North Shields Shields Daily Gazette, 1887-02-02
1891 visitor with Robert F. Spence and family, at Backworth Cottage, Backworth, Northumberland, with a governess, a nursemaid, and a cook RG 12/4234 f68 p4
1895-01-10 of Chirton Cottage; stood for election for the Tynemouth School Board Shields Daily News
1898-07-23 of Chirton Cottage, North Shields Bensham Grove visitors' books
1901 wood carver, own account, at home, of Chirton Cottage, Chirton, living with her father, sister, two nieces, a cook, a housemaid, and a visitor RG 13/4801 f5 p1
1901-07-24 among the mourners at her father's funeral in Tynemouth Shields Daily Gazette, 1901-07-25
1911 wood carver, own acct, at home, living with her brother and a boarder at 54 Front Street, Tynemouth; 8 rooms RG14PN30736 RG78PN1758 RD559 SD2 ED4 SN240
1917-04-02 executor of will of her brother John Foster Spence National Probate Calendar
1957-02-15

Miss Spence (carver of Wooden Dolly) will soon be 100

MISS Mary Emma Spence, who carved the famous Wooden Dolly which stands in the Low Street, North Shields, will soon be 100 years old.

At present confined to bed in a nursing home in Kendal, it is unlikely that she will be able to receive visitors on her birthday—February 24.

Her nephew, Mr. G. Clephan, of Monkseaton, said today: "She always said she was going to live to be 100 years old. She was most definite about that. She would say, 'I'm going to live to be a hundred. That is my target'."

STILL STANDING

The Wooden Dolly is known to seamen the world over. When North Shields was a flourishing seaport, an old ship's figurehead stood in the Low Street. Sailors going to sea would hack a piece off as good luck souvenirs.

The old figurehead was mutilated beyond recognition, so Miss Spence volunteered to replace it. In 1902 she carved a life-sized figure of a Cullercoats fishwife with a creel on her back. That figure—which is probably the fourth to occupy the site—still stands there today.

Miss Spence, the daughter of the late Ald. John Foster Spence and Mrs. Spence, was born at Chirton Cottage, North Shields.

ACTED AS MAYORESS

A life-long member of the Society of Friends—a Quaker movement—she lived with her father at Chirton Cottage until his death in 1901.

Her father was Mayor of Tynemouth from 1861—62 and from 1891—94. During his last three terms of office she acted as Mayoress.

After his death, Miss Spence moved to Front Street, Tynemouth, where she stayed until about 1917 when she went to live in the Lake District.

Shields Daily News
1957-08-31 of Cherry Garth, Hartsop, Westmorland; d. at Wingrove Nursing Home, Kendal, Westmorland National Probate Calendar

Miss Spence—carver of Dolly—dies at 100

MISS Mary Emma Spence, who cared the Wooden Dolly at North Shields, has died at the Wingrove Nursing Home, Kendal. She was 100.

It had always been her ambition to live to be 100. "That's my target," she used to say.

The Dolly she carved 55 years ago—a life-sized figure of a Cullercoats fishwife with a creel on her back—stands in Low Street. It is known to seamen all over the world.

Because of its dilapidated condition—souvenir hunters have hacked pieces from it—it is soon to be replaced by a new Dolly which will be paid for out of a fund opened to mark Miss Spence's 100th birthday.

MAYOR TWICE

Miss Spence, a former Mayoress of Tynemouth, has been confined to bed in the Kendal nursing home.

[ . . . ]

Her hobbies were gardening, painting, pottery, knitting and sewing. And she liked to skate. She skated on her 72nd birthday.

TAUGHT CARVING

Miss Spence learned to use the tools with which she carved the Dolly at an evening class run by her father for apprentice joiners and plumbers.

Later, she taught wood carving to boys in a class which she held in Union Street.

There, in her workshop she started carving the Dolly, finishing it in her studio in Front Street.

Several of her old pupils live in North Shields today.

Miss Spence was a life-long Quaker.

Shields Daily News, 1957-09-03
1957-12-31 will proved at Newcastle-upon-Tyne by Constance Clephan and Sarah Spence Clephan (wife of Guy Glephan); effects £369 1s. 1d. National Probate Calendar


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