Children of Edward and Jane Richardson

Anna Deborah Richardson 01. Anna Deborah Richardson

1832-02-22 b. Summerhill Grove, St John, Newcastle; birth witnessed by grandmother Deborah Richardson TNA: PRO RG 6/404, /1149; John Wigham Richardson, ed. (1877) Memoir of Anna Deborah Richardson, printed privately, p. 2
  named Anna, after her Aunt Ann, and Deborah, after her paternal grandmother Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 2
1837 stayed at Torquay, Devon Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 3
from 1839 attended a local Friends' day school, and later one at Old Elvet, Durham Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 4
1841 of Summerhill Grove, Westgate, Newcastle upon Tyne, living with family and four female servants PRO HO 107/824/10 f21 p34
1842

One incident in this year impressed me very much. It was at No. 6 Summerhill Grove. My sister Anna, aged ten, was standing by the fire when her clothes took fire. She shrieked and ran out of the room, and at the door she met my mother, who laid her flat on her back, and with equal promptitude covered her with a door-mat. The whole affair was over in a few seconds, and my sister was only very slightly burnt.

Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson (1911), Glasgow, p. 7
1846 summer family paid a long visit to John Wigham, in Edinburgh. 'The influence of this dear old man on her character, and also of the circle in which he moved, were very marked. Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 5
1846 sent to a Quaker private school at Lewes, Sussex, run by the Dymond sisters
1847 "Distressed at the news of the Irish Famine, Anna began a regime of 'self-imposed fasting', so impairing her health that she was unable to return to school after the summer break in 1847.' O'Donnell (2001), p. 41; Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 12
1847-10 went to stay at her grandfather's in Edinburgh, attending the winter session of classes at the Moray Place Institution Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 12
1849 a teacher at the Newcastle Friends’ Sabbath School Minutes of Friends’ Sabbath School, Newcastle, Tyne & Wear Archives Service MF 208
1849 taught siblings John & Elizabeth together. Elizabeth found her sister to be a teacher with intellectual ability, understanding, and sympathy, one with whom it was indeed a pleasure to learn. TS Reminiscences of Elizabeth Spence Watson; Richardson (1911), p. 35
  fell in love with a Priestman (possibly a rector) information from Mabel Weiss
by 1850-06 had been courted by Jonathan Priestman jr, and by this date the couple's engagement was widely known (provoking bitter feelings in his brother Hadwen, who had also hoped to marry her) Sandra Stanley Holton (2007) Quaker Women: Personal Life, Memory and Radicalism in the Lives of Women Friends, 1780–1930. Abingdon: Routledge: 106
  within weeks Priestman was having doubts, and the couple decided to allow themselves some more weeks to consider the matter; Anna subsequently decided on a clean break and ended the engagement Holton (2007): 106-7
1851 living with family at 6 Summerhill Grove, Westgate, Newcastle, with two housemaids and a cook HO 107/2404 f469 p57
1851 took her sister Elizabeth to London, on her way to school in Lewes, where they stayed in lodgings for a few days; they saw the sights of the city and the Great Exhibition TS Reminiscences of Elizabeth Spence Watson
1851 Oct spent about 2 weeks visiting with Edward Pease Sir Alfred E. Pease, Bart (1907) The Diaries of Edward Pease. The Father of English Railways. London: Headley Brothers, p. 299
1851/1852 winter paid a visit to grandfather in Edinburgh Richardson (1911), p. 52
1852 lodged for the summer at Nab Cottage in the Lake District Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 15
1852-08 with Caroline and John, stayed at Sutton, near Howth, on the northern side of Dublin Bay Richardson (1911), p. 60
1855 accompanied her brother Edward to Parish, to keep house for him O'Donnell (2001), p. 42
1856-02 with Caroline, visited Edward Pease at Darlington and Edward Smith at Sheffield Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 90
1856 autumn visited her grandfather in Edinburgh, acting as cicerone to the Smiths of Sheffield in an excursion to Perthshire Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 95
1857 spring with father and aunt Ann, toured in the Pyrenees. During the tour her father consulted her about his investments, in particular his shares in the Northumberland and Durham District Bank. Richardson, ed. (1877), pp. 102 & 112
1857 went to Edinburgh, to keep house for George and Emily Richardson (1911), p. 103
1860-10-24 secretary of the Newcastle branch of the London Society for Promoting the Employment of Women Newcastle Courant, 1860-11-02
1861 gentlewoman, living with sister in lodging house at 1 Mount Pleasant, Ilkley RG 9/3213 f86 p9
1862 autumn supported by her father, planned and had built a house at Grasmere, Heugh Folds Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 185
from 1862 wrote book review for the English Woman's Journal and the Victoria Magazine O'Donnell (2001), p. 44
up to 1863 was studying the Greek Testament with her father Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson: 6 & 165-6; Richardson (1877):188
1863-12-24 of South Ashfield Mosscroft visitors' book
  embraced High Church Anglicanism O'Donnell (2001), p. 50
1866

I have sometimes thought that if Anna's health had permitted her to engage in more active work, her intense theological feelings might have been somewhat modified. Whether for the better or not, who can say? Assuredly, her spiritual growth was a great comfort to herself, while to all her friends, her loving zeal and reverent humility caused them to feel in her presence as if they stood on holy ground.

 

Was baptised at Grasmere, and confirmed at Berwick by the Bishop.
Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 201
1866-11-02/-08 stayed at Mosscroft Mosscroft visitors' book
1867 spent the summer in Switzerland, with most of the family Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 205
from 1867 supported Emily Davies in the establishment of Girton College, Cambridge Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 214
c. 1869-04 "Anna & Carrie are abroad in Italy whither they went for Anna's health, but it has been a very unfortunate year, & they seem to have had colder weather there than we have had here." Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
from 1870-01 with Caroline, spent three months on a tour in Italy Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 227
1870-06-15 Newcastle Monthly Meeting, North Shields: resignation reported. Thomas Hodgkin & Fredk Taylor to visit. minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting 1867–74, TWAS MF 170
1870-06-19 of South Ashfield Mosscroft visitors' book
1870-08-10 Newcastle Monthly Meeting, North Shields: resignation accepted. Joseph Procter to inform. minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting 1867–74, TWAS MF 170
1871 no occupation shown, of H[e]ugh Folds, Grasmere; with cook and housemaid RG 10/5278 f42 p9
1871-05 went to Bournemouth to consult about building a house for Dr White's family, 'and this meant, in her case, that she designed it.' Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 263
1871-06 took charge of her brother John's children, by the seaside, while their parents toured Germany. Suffered from the cold on the north-east coast Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 268
from 1871-07 progressively suffering with Bright's disease Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 273
1871-11 brother John visited Anna at Heugh Folds,

and was distressed to note how weak she was. She was hardly able to walk, and had repeated attacks of sickness, and was depressed by being constantly confined to the house. In the evenings, however, when the curtains were drawn, and the lamps lighted, the old spirit would return, and she would talk in a way that you could sit and listen for hours.

Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 275
1872-05-14

My poor mother, in addition to this anxiety, had the trial of Anna's great illness. As soon as Alice was sufficiently recovered, she and Mother went to Bournemouth where Anna & Carrie were, & stayed there some time. Anna slowly recovered, but she is still very weak—she is now at Grasmere with Carrie, & our dear little Ruthie is with them.

Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
  designed 'West Knoll', Bournemouth, for her sister Emily White Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1872-08-05 of Heugh Folds, Grasmere, Ambleside, Kendal, Westmorland; d. there, of  albumenuria death certificate; The Friend NS XII.Sept:221; Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 285; National Probate Calendar
  suffered from kidney disease all her life, and died from nephritis Ann Craven (2004) ‘Elizabeth Spence Watson: a Quaker working for peace and women’s suffrage in nineteenth century Newcastle and Gateshead’, MA dissertation, University of Newcastle upon Tyne
 

My sister Anna, who had been ill for nearly a year, was taken from us on the 5th of August. My mother & Allie had only been 10 days with Nellie at Kreuznach when they were summoned home again by Ann's increasing illness. I reached Grasmere before them, & was very glad to be any help to Carrie upon whom the anxiety & trouble pressed heavily. I stayed nearly a week at Grasmere, & although, to our great joy, dear Anna rallied from this attack, it was only for a short time. Still we rejoiced that Mother & the my sisters had been recalled, for it was to all a great comfort that they were with our dear one in those last days. After much suffering, she passed into a state of unconsciousness, & at length passed quietly away on the 5th of August. She was buried in Grasmere churchyard on the 8th on a lovely summer day, the cloud shadows resting on the hills she loved so well. As she was carried to her last resting place, sweet hymns of payer & praise were sung, which lingered & will linger long in our memories. It was a great trial that Robert was unable to be with me in Grasmere—he was unavoidably detained in London. My sister Anna was one of my earliest teachers, & I owe to her more than I can say. Her loss does indeed leave a wide gap in our already too broken family circle, & even now it is often hard to realize that she, the eldest of us all, one looked up to with admiration and affection by us all, is really taken from us.

Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'; Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 286
1872-10-02 will proved at Carlisle by sister Caroline Richardson, executrix for life; effects under £2000 National Probate Calendar
1877-08

While we were at Heugh Folds my brother John sent us a copy of dear Anna's memoir, wh he had compiled. We read it with intense interest—all her delight in her mountain home so graphically described it was touching to read of there—in the dear home from wh she had passed for ever. Her letters are full of interest—especially some of the earlier ones to H.M. Peile—& three from Paris. It is a book wh will be much valued by our children & wh we rejoice that our brother has so admirably arranged—although it is a pity that some errors have crept in wh a little more care might have avoided.

Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1917-07-11 will proved at London by brother-in-law John Gregory White; effects £4741 13s. 2d.; former grant cessate National Probate Calendar
  Main source for ADR is her Memoir, available here.  
  see also: Elizabeth A. O'Donnell, 'On behalf of all young women trying to be better than they are': Feminism and Quakerism in the Nineteenth Century: The Case of Anna Deborah Richardson', Quaker Studies 6/1 (2001) [37-58]  


Caroline Richardson 02. Caroline Richardson (Car, Caro, Carrie)

1834-01-19 b. Summerhill Grove, St John, Newcastle TNA: PRO RG 6/404, /1149
1841 of Summerhill Grove, Westgate, Newcastle upon Tyne, living with family and four female servants PRO HO 107/824/10 f21 p34
1846 summer family paid a long visit to John Wigham, in Edinburgh Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 5
1847-10 went to stay at her grandfather's in Edinburgh Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 12
1849 a teacher at the Newcastle Friends’ Sabbath School Minutes of Friends’ Sabbath School, Newcastle, Tyne & Wear Archives Service MF 208
1851 living with family at 6 Summerhill Grove, Westgate, Newcastle, with two housemaids and a cook HO 107/2404 f469 p57
1851 taken by her father to see the Great Exhibition Richardson (1911), p. 48
1852-08 with Anna and John, stayed at Sutton, near Howth, on the northern side of Dublin Bay Richardson (1911), p. 60
1856-02 with Anna, visited Edward Pease at Darlington and Edward Smith at Sheffield Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 90
1856-12-07 1 of 2 from Newcastle women’s PM to attend MM at Newcastle on 4th day Minutes of Newcastle Preparative Meeting (Women’s) 1834–1878, TWAS MF 194
1860-10-24 appointed to the committee of the Newcastle branch of the London Society for Promoting the Employment of Women Newcastle Courant, 1860-11-02
1861 gentlewoman, living with sister in lodging house at 1 Mount Pleasant, Ilkley RG 9/3213 f86 p9
1865-08-29/-31 stayed at Mosscroft Mosscroft visitors' book
1865-09-15

Our dear & long absent Carrie came back to us at Heugh Folds, whither I with little Mabel, had gone to be among those to welcome her. Her long sad illness was over at last, & with health restored, she came back to us once more. It was indeed a time for great joy & deep thankfulness, & a fortnight with dear Mother & Anna & Allie, & our long lost Carrie was a truly happy time. Little Mabel was a great pleasure to all, & Carrie, who had for so long taken such a warm interest in her, was devoted to her. Ever since the day of its birth my little baby seemed to be a source of interest & comfort to Carrie—she knew when it was born, all before she was told, & said afterwards that she saw me lying pale in bed with a little nestling child beside me.

When afterwards a friend told of Mabel's birth, & gave the wrong day by mistake, Carrie said no it could not be for she had seen me the day before. The beautiful things this kind Aunt made for our pet were without number, & her tasteful hands could make them as few others could.

 

Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1866-03-08/-14 stayed at Mosscroft Mosscroft visitors' book
1866-04 spent three weeks with Anna, and Elizabeth & Mabel Spence Watson, at Heugh Folds, Allie joining them for the last week Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1866-10-14/-11-02 stayed at Mosscroft Mosscroft visitors' book
1867 spent the summer in Switzerland and Italy, with most of the family Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 205
1868-04 with Anna and Elizabeth at Heugh Folds Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
c. 1869-04 "Anna & Carrie are abroad in Italy whither they went for Anna's health, but it has been a very unfortunate year, & they seem to have had colder weather there than we have had here."
from 1870-01 with Caroline, spent three months on a tour in Italy Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 227
1871-01-23/-28 stayed at Mosscroft Mosscroft visitors' book
1871 living on interest of money, with mother, cook and 2 housemaids at South Ashfield Villa, Elswick, Newcastle RG 10/5076 f56 p43
1871-07-18 "at Mabel's happy birthday party" at Mosscroft Mosscroft visitors' book
1872-05-14

As soon as Alice was sufficiently recovered, she and Mother went to Bournemouth where Anna & Carrie were, & stayed there some time. Anna slowly recovered, but she is still very weak—she is now at Grasmere with Carrie, & our dear little Ruthie is with them.

Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1872-08-05 of Heugh Fold, Grasmere; present at sister Anna Deborah’s death death certificate
1872-10-02 of South Ashfield, Newcastle-upon-Tyne; executrix for life of the will of her sister Anna Deborah National Probate Calendar
1874-02-17 played Jaques in As You Like It at Mosscroft Mosscroft visitors' book
1874-04-01 played Duke, Salarino in Ye Marchand of Venyse at Mosscroft
1874-07 "In July during our children's holidays we spent a very happy fortnight at Grasmere with my sisters Carrie & Nellie." Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1874 "My sister Caroline has written a very interesting memoir of her [Mrs Fletcher, mother to Lady Richardson, which I have copied, & which is now being circulated among our friends."
1874-11-27

My sisters Caroline & Nellie, whose home at Ashfield since our dear mother's death is now broken up—have after spending a few weeks in Newcastle, gone to Italy for the winter. We have good accounts of them from Florence & trust the warmer climate may do dear Nellie good. They are delighted with all they have seen, so far of Italy, & anticipate much enjoyment.

1876-03-21 "It is a great delight to us that our sister Carrie has come to live at Moss Croft—it is such a pleasure to have her so near, & to see her too in our dear old house."
1877 treasurer of the [Tyneside] local committee of the Edinburgh School of Cookery
1877-09 . . . "my sister Caroline went to Heugh Folds, where she was joined by Annie Atkins."
1877 ‘Winter in Italy’, by C. Richardson published in Friends’ Quarterly Examiner XI:118–132  
1878 ‘Thomas Erskine, of Linlathen’ published in Friends’ Quarterly Examiner XII:296–323  
1880-04-23 "We had a warm welcome from our dear sister Carrie—whose lovely house, with its exquisite surroundings, looked more lovely than ever." Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1880-09 of Heugh Folds
1881 [living on] income [from] dividends, at Tregonwell Road, West Knoll, Holdenhurst, Hampshire, with sister's family, and three domestic servants RG 11/1195 f53 p43
1881-12-18/-21 stayed at Bensham Grove Bensham Grove visitors' books
1882-11-06 stayed at Bensham Grove
1883-02-24/-26 stayed at Bensham Grove; "sharing in the joy of the Liberal triumph"
1883-12-29/1884-01-06 of Heugh Folds, Grasmere; stayed at Bensham Grove
1884-10-31/-11-10

Caroline Richardson spent (no gained) 10 delightful days. One at Marsden with the children—one perfect autumn day at Alnwick. Visits to Mr. Moore Ede's Food Depôts & to the High School—a Shakespeare Reading at Mr Pattinson's. Pleasant talk of "all sorts & conditions of men". An M.P. on democratic morals one Sunday. These & other references came daily followed in the Home.

1885-07/-09 holidayed in Norway with Spence Watsons Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1885-09-15/-18

Caroline Richardson, after seven weeks in Norway with the Bensham family—a time of supreme enjoyment & benefit. The scenery, the people—all that was novel & picturesque most delightful, intensified by the joy of the children & enriched hourly by the "heart affluence in discursive talk from household fountains never dry."

Bensham Grove visitors' books
1886-10-22/-30 of Heugh Folds, Grasmere; stayed at Bensham Grove
1887-09

My sister Carrie has suffered much from her eyes, but a lengthened stay in Germany & Switzerland has done her much good. She is now again at her home at the Quarries with the Merzs—& next door to our dear Uncle Robert & Aunt Anne Foster, who are both well & take the same kind & active interest in the various branches of the family as ever.

Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1887-12-26 of The Quarries Bensham Grove visitors' books
  spent 36 winters at The Quarries with the Merz family, living at Heugh Folds in the summer Liz O'Donnell: 'Teresa Merz Timeline'
1889-08 "It was very pleasant to find our dear sister Carrie much stronger than last year, & able to walk about far more than then." Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1890-06-05

Ruth has been in Germany with "Aunt Car" whose eyes gave her great trouble. They stayed for some weeks at Wiesbaden, & it is delightful to think that now she can see quite well, & can both go about & read & write with ease—all of wh were difficult or impossible to her before. Our cousin Sarah Ann Richardson & Sara, & later Miss Davies joined "Aunt Car" & Ruth at Wiesbaden, & a very merry party they were.

"Aunt Car" is at Grasmere . . .

1891-02/-03 had long holiday in Canaries with Mabel, her mother, and Carrie Richardson; while there took Spanish lessons
1891 not found in census
1891-04 "Ruth is in Wiesbaden again with my sister Carrie, & S.A R. & Lena Richardson" . . .
1896-04-09 of Heugh Folds, Grasmere; present at niece Mabel Spence Watson’s wedding at Pilgrim Street Friends' meeting-house; signed marriage certificate RSW Cuttings; Bensham Grove visitors' books
1896 holidayed in Ireland with Spence Watsons Mary Spence Watson: diary
1896-08 had contributed £10 to appeal for Improved Accommodation for Nursing Staff at York Retreat The British Friend V Aug Ads:7
1896 subscriber to Robert Spence Watson’s History of the Literary and Philosophical Society of Newcastle upon Tyne www.litandphil.org.uk/membersb.htm
1896-12-25 of Heugh Folds Bensham Grove visitors' books
1898-12-17

Then we all went to Dawlish Devonshire to celebrate our Silver Wedding—Caro with us. It was a most delightful month at the Inn close to station the only disappointment that Charles could not be spared from Cork to join us. We read Sir Charles Lyell's life aloud and had many enchanting walks and excursions in the beautiful neighbourhood.

After that went on to Bournemouth and took up our abode at the Weston Hall Hotel—Theo and I and Teresa, Norbert and Ernest returned to Newcastle to work and Aunt Car stayed at West Knoll."

Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1899-12-01 of Newcastle; had subscribed £20 to the Bootham School Building Fund The Friend XXXIX:Supplement
1900-03-03/-07 stayed at Bensham Grove Bensham Grove visitors' books
1901 living at The Quarries, Grainger Park Rd, Elswick, Newcastle, with sister, two housemaids, kitchen maid and cook RG 13/4773 f112 p29
1901 of Heugh Folds, Grasmere; member of the Cumberland & Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society Transactions
1901-11-17 "Aunt Car with us again this winter to our joy in good health." Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1902-04-02

A happy holiday in Cornwall. Ernest with us most of time. Charles for 2 days and Caro the whole. Mullion, Lands End, Penzance, Malvern were our stopping places. The week in London as we went to Cornwall most interesting—hearing the "Power Bill" opposed in Com: Room of House of Commons. Charles astonished Counsel and general public who listened to his answers to cross-examination. Stayed at Metropole with R.S.W. and others—a fascinating time.

1903-02-26 "Caro left with Nelly for the East yesterday."
1903-05-02 back in London after their journey, "safe and sound"
1904-04-20

Just returned from our 6 weeks holiday—first 3 weeks in Isle of White (Daish's Hotel Shanklin) then 2 weeks at Grand Hotel Lyndhurst. The New Forest a wonderful one—Caro with us all the time—Ernest one week at Lyndhurst [ . . . ]"

1904 of Heugh Folds, Grasmere; gave Frank & Mary Pollard a cheque for £10, for their wedding present Mary S.W. Pollard, list of wedding presents
1905-03-31 "Caro leaves for France with Margaret White and Miss Arnett." Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1905-11-16 "Caro arrived from Hindley looking very well, delightful to have her with us once more."
1906-01 "Went to Braid Hills Hotel Edinburgh on Friday Dec. 22, Theo and I—Teresa and Caro [ . . . ]"
1906-05

Theo and I had a splendid rest at Sidmouth (Fortfield Hotel) Caro, Mabel and Molly being in lodgings near.

1907-03/04 toured in Algeria with brother John Richardson (1911), p. 350-2
1907-03-19 "Caro left for Algeria with John and S.A.R." Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1907-05-19 "Caro at Grasmere after her long travel in Algeria which was a success."
1908-04 "Caroline is not so strong as she was, and a walk of an hour tires her." Richardson (1911), p. 354
1910-03-22 "Caro left for Hexham Hydro." Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1910-04-12 "Caro at Hexham Hydro still and much stronger for the good air there." The Friend, supplement: xiv-v; 1916-01-21
1910-04-25 "Caro at Letchworth but moving on to Aspley Guise tomorrow." Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1911-04-01 "Caro preparing to leave for Grasmere on the 7th."
1911-04-07 "Caro left fairly bright and well. I feel parting from her much."
1911-04-02 with sister's family and three servants, in 12 rooms at The Quarries, Newcastle upon Tyne RG14PN30607 RG78PN1753 RD558 SD3 ED29 SN86
1911-06-08 "Caro well at H. F. with a succession of visitors." Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1913-04-03 "Caro left for Grasmere in pretty good case. We have had a lovely winter together: she grows more and more sympathetic with us and our interests."
1915-02-11 "Caro not feeling well, but is ordered tonics like most of the aged. She has found a companion a Miss Monck of Cullercoats who appears to be a sympathetic person."
1915-03-30 "Caro left with her new Companion Miss Monck: she was not very capital but reached Heugh Folds on a lovely evening."
1915-07-04 "Caro very frail but it does not stop her kind hospitality [ . . . ]."
1915-12-16 "Caro and I busy with garments for War Victims. So is Nelly in her new home at Letchworth."
1916-01-01 "Caro frail but out and about. She is deciding not to go to Heugh Folds this year!"
1916-04-09 "Caro very frail—dreading her move to Grasmere on Tuesday. I am anxious about her."
1916-05-10

What marred our peace of mind while at Bushey was dear Caro's greater frailty. Lizzie who was at Heugh Folds had to call in trained nurse for a week.

Edith White with her now

1916-05-22 "Dear Caro quite an invalid but as is her wont thinking of us all and sending Teresa £5 for her poor."
1916-05-27 "To Grasmere alone as dear Caro specially wishes to see me. We have heavy hearts about her failing strength."
1916-05-30

Caro did not expect me to linger longer with her as Edith White can stay on and is a most charming and capable help. Dr. Johnson takes a serious view of Caro's illness: she is sadly reduced in strength and very very thin—but came downstairs for a few hours and can walk round her garden even: she is patient and saintly. I left with an ache at my heart not knowing what a day may bring forth.

1916-06-28

Accounts of Caro very grave: but Edith White and maid Edith are so devoted a trained nurse is not at present necessary. Caro has to be carried downstairs now so her feebleness increases. She likes to receive letters but does not write herself now.

1916-07-06 "More and more sad reports of Caro—entirely "bed fast" now."
1916-07-08 of the Quarries, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, and of Heugh Folds, Grasmere; d. at Heugh Folds The Friend:574, 1916-07-21; GRO index; Annual Monitor; National Probate Calendar; Newcastle Journal, 1916-07-10
1916-07-09 "A more grave report of Caro—Edith thinks she is "sinking" so we think we may be summoned any hour." Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1916-07-09T11:00 "Just received a telegram that our beloved Caro passed away yesterday evening."
1916-07-10

Heard from Mother that dear Aunt Car died peacefully on July 8th in evening, conscious to the last. She had a stroke when Mother was there just after Easter, & one could not want her illness prolonged, but what a loss to all of us. She has been a wonderful Aunt & given us so many happy times, & such a wonderful example of patience & goodness . . . How I loved her, & even loved her strict ways, & the splendid way in which her household ran on wheels, so that one hardly realized anything had ever to be done.

diary of Mary S.W. Pollard
1916-07-10, Monday

We arrived at Heugh Folds in time to look once more on beloved Caro's face which was beautiful in death—strong and calm. Dear Edith White pale and the maid tired also. Theo and I stayed at the Prince of Wales Hotel for 10 days.

Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1916-07-11 bur.  Grasmere church Heugh Folds visitors' book, entry by Elizabeth Spence Watson; Newcastle Journal, 1916-07-10
 

On Tuesday the Burial in the New Cemetery near Helm Crag was very touching—exquisite wreaths and many friends—2 hymns and lesson in the historic Church first. The whole village sympathetic—Caro was greatly beloved by all. Thus closes a beautiful Chapter of our lives and we are sad indeed she will never return to this house for winter months.

Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1916-08-31 will proved at the Principal Registry in London by nephew Norbert Merz; effects £13,664 4s. (estate £13,654, net personalty £11,894) National Probate Calendar; Birmingham Daily Post, 1916-09-05
1919-07-19 "The stone cross is now in position on dear Caro's grave at Grasmere—Norbert taken much pains to get this accomplished." Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript


Edward Richardson03. Edward Richardson (Ned)

1835-06-07 b. Summerhill Grove, Newcastle-upon-Tyne TNA: PRO RG 6/404, /1149
1841 of Summerhill Grove, Westgate, Newcastle upon Tyne, living with family and four female servants PRO HO 107/824/10 f21 p34
1846 summer family paid a long visit to John Wigham, in Edinburgh Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 5
1846/1850 at Bootham School Bootham School Register (1971)
1851 tanner; living with family at 6 Summerhill Grove, Westgate, Newcastle, with two housemaids and a cook HO 107/2404 f469 p57
  chemical manure manufacturer, of Newcastle-on-Tyne Bootham School Register
1854 studied the flute Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson (1911), Glasgow, p. 77
1855-09 in Paris, studying chemistry under Monsieur Pelouze Richardson (1911), p. 82
between 1855 and 1859 gave talk to Scientific and Literary Society on ‘On the Consumption of Smoke’ John William Steel (1899) A Historical Sketch of the Society of Friends 'in Scorn called Quakers' in Newcastle & Gateshead 1653–1898. London & Newcastle, Headley Bros.: 101
1856-06-14

WORKMEN'S FESTIVITY.—On Saturday, the workpeople of Messrs J. and E. Richardson, tanners, to the number of sixty, were treated by their respected employers with a substantial dinner of roast beef and plum pudding. Tea was also served up. The festivities and rejoicings took place in honour of Mr David Richardson and Mr Edward Richardson, sons of the partners in the firm, attaining their majority.

Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury, 1856-06-21
c. 1860-01 his father bought him a half share of the Blaydon Chemical Company, from their neighbour Robert Hawthorn Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson; Richardson private ledger, TWAS Acc. 161/330
1861-03-08 chemical manufacturer of Newcastle; sued John Shiells, farmer and horse dealer, for recovery of £80 for a horse which Shiells had warranted, but which turned out to be unsound; the jury found that warranty had been given, but that the animal was sound when sold Newcastle Courant, 1861-03-08
1861 manufacturing chemist employing 30 men, living with 1 servant at 3 Lovaine Place, St Andrews, Newcastle on Tyne RG 9/3818 f44 p2
1863-07 subscribed £1 1s. to the Natural History Society's fund for the alteration and improvement of the museum Newcastle Courant, 1863-07-03
1863-07-20 of South Ashfield, Newcastle Mosscroft visitors' book
1864 health began to cause anxiety.

Edward's illness was mental. He had induced my father to allow him to extend the works at Blaydon by adding the manufacture of alkali to the manure business. I believe Edward would have preferred to establish works in the lower reaches of the Tyne, by which the transfer of the raw salt into barges then requisite on account of the old bridge at Newcastle, as also other lighterage would also have been avoided. To this, however, my father would not agree, and, as it turned out, this decision was right. In the coming years, all the small alkali works had to shut up owing to the introduction by Brunner, Mond & Co. of the Solvay or ammonia process, and had my brother started works on a new site, the loss would have been so much the greater. Edward worried very much over his business, and suffered from sleeplessness and aggravated constipation.

Richardson (1911), pp. 182-3
1867 spent the summer in Switzerland, with most of the family Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 205
1868-01 subscribed £10 10s. to the fund for the Diana Training Ship for Destitute and Homeless Boys Newcastle Courant, 1868-01-24
1869-01-12 of 3 Lovaine Place, from where 5 st. 7lb of lead was stolen from the cornice of the front door by Lionel Robson Watson, who was later sentenced to 10 months' imprisonment and hard labour Newcastle Courant, 1869-02-26
1870-01-27 elected to the committee of the Newcastle and Gateshead Chamber of Commerce Newcastle Courant, 1870-01-28
1871 income from property, living with one general servant at 3 Lovaine Place, St Andrews, Newcastle-on-Tyne RG 10/5084 f50 p2
1873-12-17 gentleman, of 3 Lovaine Place, Newcastle-Tyne; witness at his sister Alice's wedding at Newcastle upon Tyne fmh sister's marriage certificate
1881 retired manufacturer, living with a housekeeper at 6 Stanley Ter., Coxlodge, Northumberland RG 11/5096 f53 p96
1881-09-04 of Stanley Terrace, Gosforth Bensham Grove visitors' books
1881-12-26 of Gosforth
1890 "He had three separate mental attacks at intervals of eight or nine years, and at the third attack in 1890 he quietly passed away at Warkworth." Richardson (1911), p. 183; Bootham School Register
1890-04-27 gentleman, of Walkworth, Northumberland; d. there National Probate Calendar; GRO index
1890-06-21 will proved at Newcastle by brother John Wigham Richardson; personal estate £119 8s. 11d. National Probate Calendar


John Wigham Richardson 04. (John) Wigham Richardson (Johnnie, Jack)

1837-01-07 b. Tor, parish of Tor Mohun, Devon TNA: PRO RG 6/404, 1149; Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson (1911), Glasgow, p. 5
1837-08 taken to Aberdeen on a visit to his great-grandfather, John Wigham Richardson (1911), p. 5
1841 of Summerhill Grove, Westgate, Newcastle upon Tyne, living with family and four female servants PRO HO 107/824/10 f21 p34
1841 "I remember I had a pony, on which I used to ride with my father." Richardson (1911), p. 6
 

It was, I think, in this or the previous year that I remember playing in front of the houses in Summerhill Grove, which at that time was not a thoroughfare, when my father came on horseback to say good-bye to my mother before going out to East Law. I was then four and a half years old. I said, "Oh, papa, take me." He replied, "Why not?" and told the nurse to put me up behind me, and so we rode the twelve miles. I have no doubt that my father was tenderly solicitous, but none the less I more than once, when jolting behind him, rued my rash request and felt ready to cry.

Richardson (1911), p. 7
c. 1843 with sister Lizzie, at a school in Westgate Road, just below the lower entrance to Summerhill Grove, kept by two Friends named Goundry Richardson (1911), p. 7
1845

I went to Bruce's Academy in Percy Street, Newcastle, but only for part of a year, where I gained, in June 1845, two prizes for history and geography respectively.

Richardson (1911), p. 8
 

My health had always been a matter of concern to my dear parents, and in the late summer of 1845 I was sent to Carlisle to the care of Robert Doeg and his wife, (née Sarah Ann Squire).

Richardson (1911), p. 11
1846 summer spent by the whole family with his grandfather Wigham, partly at Edinburgh, and partly by the seaside, at the village of Dirleton not far from the Bass Rock Richardson (1911), p. 18
1847 summer family took lodgings at Whitburn, a charming seaside village a little north of Sunderland Richardson (1911), p. 24
1847 went to the other side of Carlisle to an old house called Harraby Hill, lying about a mile fr city along the main South Road Richardson (1911), p. 27
1850/1852 at Bootham School, 20 Bootham, York Bootham School Register (1971); Richardson (1911), p. 41
1851 scholar at Bootham, St Giles, York HO 107/2353 f230 p31
1851 taken by his father to see the Great Exhibition Richardson (1911), p. 48
1851/1852 winter paid a visit to grandfather in Edinburgh Richardson (1911), p. 52
1852-08 with sisters Anna and Caroline, stayed at Sutton, near Howth, on the northern side of Dublin Bay Richardson (1911), p. 60
 

After the Irish trip some months were spent in more or less desultory study, and I having expressed some inclination for shipbuilding, an offer from Senhouse Martindale to instruct me in ship draughting at Liverpool was accepted.

1853/1856 apprenticed to Jonathon Robson, a steam-tug builder in Gateshead Richardson (1911), p. 71
1855 member of the Newcastle Scientific and Literary Society John William Steel (1899) A Historical Sketch of the Society of Friends 'in Scorn called Quakers' in Newcastle & Gateshead 1653–1898. London & Newcastle, Headley Bros.: 101
1855-09 visited his brother Edward in Paris Richardson (1911), p. 82
between 1855 and 1859 gave talk to Scientific and Literary Society on ‘Astrology.’ Steel (1899): 101
1856/1857 at University College, London; studied Latin, German, English Literature, and Mathematics. Lodged at 13 Albert Street, Camden Town Bootham School Register; Richardson (1911), pp. 84-5, 87
1857 went on 11-week tour of Germany and Switzerland Richardson (1911), p. 89
1857-10-30

Lloyds' Register of British and Foreign Shipping, Liverpool

10th. month 30th. 1857.

I hereby certify that I have known John Wigham Richardson from childhood. He was an inmate at my house for some time, learning to model and draught vessels, and also to gain an insight into shipbuilding generally, and he soon became master of all he undertook in this line. I have much pleasure in recommending him as a draughtsman to any shipbuilder, believing him to be a competent, steady and obliging young man of strictly honest principles and unimpeachable character.

Senhouse Martindale,

Lloyds' Surveyor

Richardson (1911), pp. 69-70
1857 began work in the machine-drawing office of the Forth Banks Engine Works Richardson (1911), p. 105
1858 visited Hamburg Richardson (1911), pp. 111-2
1860-03 resigned his situation at the Hawthorns Richardson (1911), p. 125
1860 at the age of just 23, he founded the Neptune Works at Walker on Tyne, with a loan of less than £5,000 from his father. This was one of the world's first shipyards to build ships in steel, and the original steam engine on the site also provided electric lighting to the neighbourhood Richardson (1911), p. 128; wikipedia entry on JWR, accessed 2008-09-04
1860-10

"Don Juan Wigham Richardson" was appointed Consul of the Argentine Republic "in the city and port of Newcastle-on-Tyne." It is not known how long he held this position, but he probably did so only for a short time.

Richardson (1911), p. 130
1861 iron ship builder employing 40 men and ten boys, living with parents, siblings, and four general servants at 1 South Ashfield Villa, Elswick Lane, Elswick, Newcastle PRO RG 9/3815 f47 p2
1862 saw the sights of Paris, with sisters Elizabeth and Emily Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson: 159
1863-07-20 of South Ashfield, Newcastle Mosscroft visitors' book
1863-12-25 of South Ashfield
1864-04-12 m. Mary Anne Henrietta Thöl (1841–1935, of Brixton, daughter of John Philip Thöl, gentleman), at St Martin’s parish church, Brixton, Surrey, by licence; witnesses: Fr Lükas, J.P. Thöl, James P. Thöl, Theodore Waterhouse, Agnes Thöl marriage certificate; The Friend IV.116, 1864-05-01; GRO index; Richardson (1911), p. 181 [which says the church was St Matthew's, as does the Newcastle Courant, 1864-04-15, and the Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury, 1864-04-16]
1864-04-13 Newcastle Monthly Meeting at North Shields: ‘The overseers of Newcastle have informed this meeting that John Wigham Richardson has been married in a manner contrary to our rules. Charles Wilson, Daniel Oliver & William Henry Holmes are appointed to visit him and report.’ minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting 1861–67, Tyne & Wear Archives Service MF 170
1864-05-15 of Rye Hill Mosscroft visitors' book
1864-07-13 Newcastle Monthly Meeting at Sunderland: report that "He received us in an agreeable manner, and expressed his attachment to the religious principles held by our Society, and his desire to remain in membership;—he also informed us of his wife’s increasing appreciation of our religious views. We understand they are both in the regular practice of attending our Meetings on First day Mornings." Minute continued. minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting 1861–67, TWAS MF 170
1864-08-10 Newcastle Monthly Meeting at North Shields: decision to take no further action minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting 1861–67, TWAS MF 170
1864-11-09 Newcastle Town Council order the sealing of a 76 year lease to JWR of 1040 square yards at Willington, for £12 rent, with liberty to build on it Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury, 1864-11-12
Children: Philip Wigham (1865–1953), Ernestine (1868–1953), Maurice Wigham (1869–1937), Cecil (1870–1885), Theodora Wigham (1871–1932), George Beigh (1872–1935), Felix Gabriel (1878–1894) birth certificates; The Times; The Friend; The British Friend; GRO index; Bootham School Register
1865-01-26 son b. at 32 Rye Hill, Elswick, Newcastle; informant the father, of that address birth certificate
1866-06-06/-09 stayed at Mosscroft Mosscroft visitors' book
1866 autumn removed from Rye Hill to Wingrove House Richardson (1911), p. 204; Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
around 1868 frequently in Germany, with his wife, in those years Richardson (1911), p. 222
1868/1872 of Wingrove House, Westgate, Newcastle children's birth certificates; The Friend; The British Friend
1869-12-12 visited Mosscroft; "First visit after R.S.W. sat up with me all night." Mosscroft visitors' book
1870-05-01/-07, 1870-05-14/-20 stayed at Mosscroft; . . . "received great kindness spending his visit as sketched." [drawing of himself ill in bed, attended on by a woman]
1871 shipbuilder and chemical manufacturer employing 1000 men, of Wingrove House, Elswick, Newcastle; living with wife and four children, a cook, a housemaid, and two nurses (and a visitor) RG 10/5082 f92 p47
1871-11-26 visited Mosscroft; "John Wigham Richardson who would be more esteemed by his brother-in-law R.S.W. were he not one of those "large (?) employers of labour". Mosscroft visitors' book
1872-06-11/-15 stayed at Mosscroft
1872-08-22 with Rosie Thöl and Spence Watsons in Grindelwald letter from Elizabeth to Mabel & Ruth Spence Watson, TWAS Acc. 213/10
1873-09

Robert & my sister Allie & my brother John & I set off for Switzerland at the end of August. We went by Southampton, spending a few happy hours (Alice & I) at Bournemouth on the way, with Gregory & Emmie & the darling children in their sweet home. We were three weeks away, at Geneva, Sixt, Champéry, Siou, Evolena & Zermatt, & home by Neufchatel & Paris. John had such a severe attack of asthma at Sixt that he left us & went to Geneva, but, rapidly recovering, he happily rejoined us at Zermatt. Robert & he went up Monte Rosa. My feet were too sore for me to do any climbing, so Allie & I contented ourselves with going round by the vallies, while R. took the high passes.

Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1874-02-17 played the Duke in As You Like It at Mosscroft Mosscroft visitors' book
1874-05-11 played the Duke of Cornwall in King Lear at Mosscroft
1874 published a pamphlet, Lloyd’s Register of Shipping: its effect, with other Societies for the classification of Vessels, upon the art of Ship-Building, severely criticising the Register Richardson (1911), p. 220; British Library catalogue, accessed 2008-10-22
1874-08-13/-19 stayed at Mosscroft Mosscroft visitors' book
1876

While the shipbuilding business was expanding rapidly J.W.R. was, to use his own words, "working harder than any man has a right to work." His health, always frail, was severely taxed by overwork; moreover, he had fallen into the practice, so fatally easy to a busy man, of taking scarcely any exercise. In view of his rather reckless horsemanship and the uneven paving of some of the streets to be traversed, his friends had not been sorry, when he abandoned his custom of riding to and from the works. But the change had this disadvantage, that it encouraged the sedentary habits to which his way of life naturally inclined him. He now drove daily in a closed carriage to and from Walker, occupying himself the while with a book—for choice his beloved Ovid, and almost wholly neglected the physical exercise which became no longer compulsory.

Even his fiery energy could not indefinitely sustain him under such conditions, and in the autumn of 1876 he was laid aside with a severe attack of rheumatic fever. His sufferings were acute. For at least a fortnight, twenty-three hours out of every twenty-four were a mere blur of continuous pain. During the remaining twenty-fourth his senses were blunted by injections of morphia, and the prospect of this blessed respite supported him through the long period of consciousness. Recovery was long deferred and often interrupted.

Richardson (1911), p. 247-8
 

 

was sent to Buxton in the hope of averting the attack

It was many weeks before he could be removed to Newcastle, and when at last it was possible to travel he was still in a very feeble condition,1 so shrunken and wasted that his brother-in-law, Robert Spence Watson, lifted him like a child out of the railway carriage. He reached home in safety, but a long time had yet to elapse before he was perfectly re-established.

1It may be noted that he was always rather below the average weight proportioned to his height . . . .

Richardson (1911), p. 249
1877-10

. . . my dearest R. having been abroad on a business journey with my brother John. He has been the greater part of the time at Buda Pesth—& I have had delightful letters from him full of interest, detailing all the curious things he meets with. They have necessarily in the course of their business, been brought into contact with several very aristocratic families, & have been most hospitably, indeed royally entertained.

Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1881 ship and engine builder employing 1200 to 1300 men, living with family at Wingrove House, Westgate Road, Elswick, Newcastle-on-Tyne, with five servants RG 11/5055 f162 p24
1881-10-30 of Wingrove, N'castle Bensham Grove visitors' books
  suffered from asthma Ann Craven (2004) ‘Elizabeth Spence Watson: a Quaker working for peace and women’s suffrage in nineteenth century Newcastle and Gateshead’, MA dissertation, University of Newcastle upon Tyne
1882-05 of Neptune Works, Newcastle-on-Tyne; notice to proceed with patent 'Improvements in compound marine steam engines' North-Eastern Daily Gazette, 1882-05-18
1882-09-09 of Wingrove, Newcastle Bensham Grove visitors' books
1882-11-21 of Wingrove House
1883 founding Chairman of the board of directors of Shipping World magazine Richardson (1911), p. 266
1883-09-02 . . . "glad to see the professor before leaving for New Zealand" Bensham Grove visitors' books
1883-11-07 of Wingrove
1883-12-25 of Wingrove House, Newcastle
1884-09-18 of Wingrove House
1884-12-25 of Wingrove, N'ctle
1885 spent five months in Russia, with his wife, primarily but not wholly on business Richardson (1911), p. 274
1885-04-24 "Mrs. W's brother Jack, just home from a round,—Bremen, Hamburg, Berlin, Cracow, Wolochisk, Odessa, Sevastopol, Yalta,—Constantiople, Athens, Naples, Rome, Genoa, Marseille, Genoa, Lucerne,—& home." Bensham Grove visitors' books
1889 published Practical Directions for the Construction and Fixing of Sun-dials British Library catalogue, accessed 2008-10-22
1890 True to his Quaker beliefs, John Wigham Richardson cared greatly for the workers in his company and was a founder of the Workers’ Benevolent Trust in the region, a forerunner to the trades’ union movement. In 1890 he became President of North East Coast Institution of Engineers & Shipbuilders. wikipedia entry on JWR, accessed 2008-09-04; Richardson (1911), p. 296
  Chairman, Blaydon Manure & Alkali Co.; Director, John Wigham Richardson & Co., Swan Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Tyne Pontoons & Dry Docks Co., Wallsend Slipway & Engineering Co., Walker & Wallsend Gas Co. Benwell Community Project (1978) The Making of a Ruling Class, Newcastle
1890-06-21 iron ship builder; executor of the will of his brother Edward National Probate Calendar
1890-11 with wife and Dora, began foreign tour of several months Richardson (1911), p. 307
1891 engineer and ship builder, living at Wingrove House with family, four servants, and a visitor; as Wigham Richardson RG 12/4199 f106 p37
1892 appointed JP; served continuously in the West Castle Ward of the county, being a member too of the county licensing and prison visiting committees Richardson (1911), p. 340
1895-12-25 "still at Wingrove" Bensham Grove visitors' books
1896-04-09 present at niece Mabel Spence Watson’s wedding at Pilgrim Street Friends' meeting-house; signed marriage certificate RSW Cuttings
1896 subscriber to Robert Spence Watson’s History of the Literary and Philosophical Society of Newcastle upon Tyne www.litandphil.org.uk/membersb.htm
  a director of the Walker and Wallsend Union Gas Company Oxford DNB; John Rowland  (1960) Progress in Power, London: Newman Neame, p21
1896-07-19 of Wingrove Bensham Grove visitors' books
1896-12-25
1898-12-26 of Wingrove House—N'c'tle
1900-07-01 "returned from Italy"
1900-12-25 of Wingrove Ho.
1901 JP manu engr and ship bldr, living with family at Wingrove House, Westgate Road, Elswick, Newcastle-on-Tyne, Northumberland, with a cook, a parlourmaid, a housemaid, a serving maid, and a kitchen maid; as Wigham Richardson RG 13/4773 f139 p21
1902-06-13/-16 stayed at Bensham Grove; "finding an ideal site pending Hindley being ready." Bensham Grove visitors' books
1902-06 "Wingrovites busy moving to Hindley Hall, Stocksfield." Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1902

Owing to the approaching termination of the lease the Richardson family removed in 1902 from Wingrove House, their home for thirty-seven years, to Hindley Hall near Stocksfield, some fourteen miles west of Newcastle. After this migration J.W.R. took a less active share in the business of his firm, going to Walker only once a week.

Richardson (1911), p. 339
  JP, engineer and shipbuilder, of Hindley Hall, Stocksfield, Northumberland Bootham School Register (1971)
1903-05-28 "As weeks pass we miss the dear Wingrovites more and more but they are satisfied the move to Hindley Hall was the right thing to do." Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1903-06-11

A magnificent piano Steinway Mignon Grand presented to the house by the 4, in commemoration of their ages mounting up to 100! A splendid gift truly and one which will bring pleasure to all. Charles leads the way in most sumptuous presents.

1903 company merged with Swan Hunter's yard to become Swan Hunter and Wigham Richardson Ltd, with initial share capital of £1,500,000. This Company became the most technically advanced ship building facilities anywhere and built the RMS Mauretania for Cunard which was launched in 1906 and held the Blue Riband as the fastest liner across the Atlantic for 26 years. wikipedia entry on JWR, accessed 2008-09-04; Richardson (1911), pp. 343-4; Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 1903-06-18
1903-08-19 had just spent a week visiting sister Alice, with Denis Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1904-08-03 present at niece’s wedding in Newcastle RSW Cuttings, Vol. 6
1904 of Hindley Hall, Stocksfield-on-Tyne; gave Frank & Mary Pollard a cheque for £20, for their wedding present Mary S.W. Pollard, list of wedding presents
1905-04 spent most of the month in Jamaica Richardson (1911), p. 344
1905-12-19 "Hindleyites to Bournemouth [ . . . ]" Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1906-01-04 "The Hindleyites all staying in Bournemouth and not likely to come north before Dora's wedding [ . . . ]"
1907-03 cited to give evidence before the Royal Commission on the Poor Laws and Relief of Distress. The official summary of his statements on this occasion includes the following autobiographical summary:

I was brought up and have lived in what may be called ultra-philanthropic circles, and have been connected with engineering and shipbuilding since 1853, i.e. for fifty-four years, and I am now vice-chairman of the firm which has launched in tonnage and value more steamers than any other firm in the United Kingdom. I have served on the Local Board of Walker and on the County Council of Northumberland, and I was for three years chairman of the Longbenton School Board, and am a magistrate for Northumberland, Chairman of the Licensing Bench of the West Castle Ward, and on the Committee for visiting the prisons.

Richardson (1911), p. 346
1907-03/04 toured in Algeria with sister Caroline Richardson (1911), p. 350-2
1907-03-19 "Caro left for Algeria with John and S.A.R." Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1907-10-26 "John on the trial trip of the huge boat "Mauritania.""
1907-11-25 "J.W.R. been trial trip of their great Cunarder "The Mauritania" and highly pleased with the success thereof."
 

Member Walker Urban District Council: Chairman Long Benton School Board: J.P. for Northumberland: Chairman Licensing Bench: Member Committee for visiting prisons; County Councillor Northumberland: President North East Coast Inst. of Engineers and Shipbuilders: Member Inst. Naval Architects: President Newcastle Economic Society: Chairman Wigham Richardson & Co., Ltd.: Chairman Blaydon Manure and Alkali Co.: Director Tyne Pontoons and Dry Docks Co.: Director Walker and Wallsend Union Gas Co.: Director Wallsend Slipway and Engineering Co.: Director Wallsend and Willington Park and Building Land Syndicate: Pub.—many contributions to "The Shipping World" and Inaugural Addresses: Tastes and Hobbies—great traveller: classical scholar and facility for modern languages: Schemes of co-partnery and profit-sharing for workmen: practical and sympathetic philanthropist:

Collinson, ed. (1935)
1908-04-15 of Hindley Hall, Stocksfield, Northumberland; d. soon after 5 a.m., at 11 Nottingham Place, London, in his 72nd year The Friend XLVIII:274, 1908-04-24; GRO index; National Probate Calendar; Oxford Dictionary of National Biography; Richardson (1911), p. 356
  "[ . . . ] he died after an operation in a Home in London—Marian at Kew at the time." Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1908-04-18 bur. Kensal Green Cemetery, London, in a wicker basket coffin Oxford DNB; Richardson (1911), p. 356; Manchester Courier and General Advertiser, 1908-07-08
1908-07-04 will proved at London by sons Philip Wigham Richardson and George Beigh Richardson; effects £92,000 19s. 7d., with net personalty of £88,721. National Probate Calendar; Benwell Community Project (1978) The Making of a Ruling Class, Newcastle; Manchester Courier and General Advertiser, 1908-07-08
1909-02-14 window dedicated to his memory in Walker Church Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
  John Wigham Richardson was one of the great figures of British industrial life, and a leading shipbuilder on Tyneside during the late 19th and early 20th century. wikipedia entry on JWR, accessed 2008-09-04
1911-06-01 "The J. W. Memoirs being read and talked of—considered racy—interesting and well brought out—thanks to George's careful and arduous work over them." Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
  Main source for JWR is the Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson (1911), Glasgow; see also his entry in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.  


Elizabeth (Richardson) Spence Watson 05. Elizabeth Richardson


George William Richardson06. George William Richardson

1840-12-06 b. East Law, Ebchester, Durham birth certificate; birth digest; TNA: PRO HO 107/824/10 f21 p34; PRO RG 9/3815 says Shotley Bridge, Ebchester
1841 living with family at Summerhill Grove, Westgate, Newcastle upon Tyne, with family and four female servants PRO HO 107/824/10 f21 p34
1846 summer family paid a long visit to John Wigham, in Edinburgh Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 5
1851 scholar, of Harraby, Cumberland HO 107/2429 f167 p3
1854/1856 at Bootham School; hobbies—fives, riding Bootham School Register (1971); Edgar B. Collinson, ed. (1935) Bootham School Register
1857 autumn visited the lakes with sister Anna John Wigham Richardson, ed. (1877) Memoir of Anna Deborah Richardson, printed privately, p. 114
1857 went to Edinburgh to study chemistry under Professor Lyon Playfair Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 126; Richardson (1911), p. 103
1859

George finished his studies under Professor Playfair at (I think) the midsummer term of 1859. Some years later I travelled with the Professor (afterwards Lord Playfair), who spoke with much affection of my brother, and contrasted his gentlemanly ways with the rough manners of some of the Scotch students.

Richardson (1911), p. 118
1860 "I think it was in 1860, (when I was on a visit to your Uncle George then a fellow student with me in Edinburgh,) that I first went to Bensham." letter from J. Gregory White to Evelyn Weiss, 1919-02-24, now at Tyne & Wear Archives Service
1861 leather manufr assistant, living with parents, siblings, and four general servants at 1 South Ashfield Villa, Elswick Lane, Elswick, Newcastle RG 9/3815 f47 p2
1863-08-20 of South Ashfield Mosscroft visitors' book
1864 health began to cause anxiety. Sent to the United States with John Gregory White, in a sailing ship. White remarked on 'his pleasantly humorous and courteous ways and his great kindness of heart.' Richardson (1911), p. 182
1865-09-15

First my poor brother George fell into ill-health, & after trying various remedies, he at last went with Dr White to America for a complete change. Even this did not have the effect we could wish.

George went to Oxfordshire to work a little at farming there for the winter, & he is now a good deal better.

 

Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1867 spent the summer in Switzerland and Italy, with most of the family Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 205; Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1869-03-17 of Elswick Mosscroft visitors' book
1868-06-22/-07-02 stayed at Mosscroft; "Came home invalided & was carefully nursed by the whole household."
1869-10-28/-29 stayed at Mosscroft
c. 1870-10-01

My poor brother George who had been away for so long returned home about 2 months ago in a sadly invalided state. We much fear he will never be well again, & if is sad indeed to see him in such a weak & helpless state.

Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1871-01-07 tanner / leather manufactr of South Ashfield, Newcastle; d. there of lung disease Annual Monitor; burials digest; GRO index; National Probate Calendar; Ann Craven (2004) ‘Elizabeth Spence Watson: a Quaker working for peace and women’s suffrage in nineteenth century Newcastle and Gateshead’, MA dissertation, University of Newcastle upon Tyne
 

George's long illness reached a climax towards the close of the year, and for more than a fortnight he lost all power of utterance. On the morning of the 7th January, 1871, I called as usual, and found his attendant coming weeping down stairs. He told me that just before daybreak, he had been startled by George saying quite clearly and quietly: "Joseph, my Father has come, and I am going home." I went up stairs and found him fast sinking, and it was almost incredible that he should have been able to articulate. Anna, with Uncle and Aunt Foster were in the room, and we stood and watched while the life was flickering away. It is the only death-bed I have ever seen, and when, at length, a kind of groan and convulsive movement shewed to the weeping bystanders that all was over, I could not but recall the closing lines of the Æneid, where Virgil, nearly two thousand years ago, described the indignant or offended soul flying from the cold body.

Anna advanced with streaming eyes, and closed the eyelids, and then, with almost a queenly gesture, motioned to us to leave the room.

And so the most beloved, the pet of the family, was released from a life of suffering, which had pursued him almost from his birth. So true a friend, so affectionate a nature, I shall hardly meet with during the remaining years of my pilgrimage.

Richardson, ed. (1877), pp. 257-8
 

My poor brother George died on the 7th of January, & much as we missed him, we could not but rejoice that his suffering life was ended. He was laid in the Westgate Cemetery beside my dear Father & little Isaac & Maggie.

Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1871-01-10 bur. Westgate Cemetery, Newcastle burials digest
1871-02-13 will proved at Newcastle-upon-Tyne by Henry Richardson and Robert Spence Watson; effects under £16,000 National Probate Calendar


07. Isaac Richardson

1842-02-14 b. Newcastle-upon-Tyne birth digest; GRO index; The Friend
1842-03-23 birth note dated 1842-02-14 read to Newcastle Monthly Meeting at Sunderland minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting, Tyne & Wear Archives Service MF 169
1846 summer family paid a long visit to John Wigham, in Edinburgh Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 5
  'This brother, Isaac, was a child of great beauty and promise, and had more of Anna's nature than any of the rest.' Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 12
1846-12-26 d. at Summerhill Grove, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, aged 4 years and 10 months, of hydrocephalus 7 days death certificate; burials digest; The Friend; The British Friend; Annual Monitor; Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 12
1847-12-30 bur. Westgate Hill General Cemetery, Newcastle burials digest; Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'


Jane Emily (Richardson) White08. (Jane) Emily Richardson (Emmie)

1844-08-18 b. Newcastle birth digest; GRO index; The British Friend
1846 summer family paid a long visit to John Wigham, in Edinburgh Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 5
1851 [as Jane Elizth] living with family at 6 Summerhill Grove, Westgate, Newcastle, with two housemaids and a cook TNA: PRO HO 107/2404 f469 p57
1857 went to Edinburgh with Anna and George. Met Dr John Gregory White there. Attended classes at a young ladies' institution Richardson (1911), p. 103; Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 121
1861 scholar, Polam Hall, St Cuthbert’s, Darlington, Durham PRO RG 9/3680 f19 p32
1862 saw the sights of Paris, with siblings John and Elizabeth Memoirs of John Wigham Richardson: 159
1863-11-15 of South Ashfield Mosscroft visitors' book
1864-02-29/-03-04 of South Ashfield; stayed at Mosscroft
1864-04-12 bridesmaid at brother John's wedding Richardson (1911), p. 181
1865-07-03 left with Elizabeth Spence Watson and Allie Richardson for tour in Switzerland Robert & Elizabeth Spence Watson: Ms journal of their wedding tour, now at Tyne & Wear Archives Service; Robert Spence Watson (1969) Reminiscences of the late Rt Hon. Robert Spence Watson. York, privately printed, p. 43
1865-11-03/-04 stayed at Mosscroft Mosscroft visitors' book
1866-05-02 of South Ashfield
1866-07-18 Newcastle Monthly Meeting at North Shields: Intention to marry of John Gregory White of Whitney MM & Jane Emily Richardson of Newcastle. Daniel Oliver & Robert Foster appointed—notice from Whitney MM held 1866-07-10 minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting 1861–67, TWAS MF 170
1866-08-15 Monthly Meeting at North Shields: liberated. Thomas Pumphrey & James Richardson to ensure good order minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting 1861–67, TWAS MF 170
1866-08-18 of South Ashfield Mosscroft visitors' book
1866-08-22 of South Ashfield, Newcastle; m. John Gregory White, MD, MRCS (1838–1930) of Woodstock, Oxfordshire, son of Richard Edward White, of Ampthill, Bedfordshire, at Newcastle-on-Tyne Friends' meeting house The Friend VI.69:203; The British Friend 9:236; minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting 1861–67, TWAS MF 170; marriage digest; marriage certificate; catalogue entry for marriage certificate, Bedfordshire and Luton Archives and Record Service, HW/98/81
 

We both came home much strengthened & refreshed by our little tour, & a week after our return our dear sister Emmie's marriage took place. We had all long known & liked Gregory White, & there seems every prospect of a very happy union. The Wedding Day passed off most satisfactorily—the meeting was a particularly impressive one, & the ceremony very well gone through. Allie Nellie & M.F. White were the three bridesmaids. Very pretty indeed they looked in their graceful white dresses, while the Bride in simple muslin attire looked lovely. The bridegroom's men were Dr Compson, Dr Baker & our cousin Joe Richardson. The breakfast was beautiful & excellent, & the evening pleasantly spent—the bridal pair departing for Edinburgh at half past four. So although we are to lose our dear Emmie who must dwell far away at Woodstock, we rejoice in her happiness, & in the joyful fulfilment of long secretly cherished hopes. They are still away on their wedding tour, & have fallen in with our other sisters who are making a tour in Scotland.

Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
Children: Douglas (1868–1943), Margaret (1869–1945), Mildred (1871–1937), Hilda (1873–1899), Mary Gladys G. (1874–1935), Frances Emily (1876–1899), Edward How (1878–1940), and Edith Somers G. (1882–1945) birth certificates; GRO index; The Friend; The British Friend
1867-01-15 very ill Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1867-03-21/-23 of Woodstock Mosscroft visitors' book
1867-09-16
1868/1869 children's birth certificates; The Friend NS X.2.48
1870-10-04 Mosscroft visitors' book
1871 living with family and a nursery maid in Holdenhurst, Bournemouth RG 10/1178 f26 p43
1871-07-13

I forgot to mention in connection with my mother & sisters' visit to London that they afterwards went to Bournemouth to see my sister Emmie & her husband, who have removed there from Woodstock. They hope Bournemouth will prove a more remunerative as well as a pleasanter place than Woodstock, & all are so far highly pleased with it. They are at present only in lodgings, but intend to build.

Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1871-10-06 of Bournemouth Mosscroft visitors' book
1871-10-23 of South Ashfield, Newcastle-on-Tyne The Friend NS XI.Nov:274; daughter’s birth certificate
1872-07-29 of Bournemouth Mosscroft visitors' book
1872-08-01
1873-02-24
1873-06-01
1873-07-13 daughter b. at Adelaide Villas, Bournemouth Holdenhurst, Christchurch, Hampshire birth certificate
1873-12-10 of Bournemouth Mosscroft visitors' book
1874-11-27 daughter b. at 1 Adelaide Villa, Bournemouth Holdenhurst birth certificate
1875 late autumn at West Knoll, Bournemouth, was host to her sister Elizabeth's family for two weeks, while Bensham Grove was made ready for their occupation

RSW & ESW letters now at TWAS

1881 of Tregonwell Road, West Knoll, Holdenhurst, Hampshire, living with family, sister, and three domestic servants RG 11/1195 f53 p43
1883-09-07/-08 of West Knoll, Bournemouth; stayed at Bensham Grove Bensham Grove visitors' books
1884-09-23/-29
1886-05-01/-04 of West Knoll, Bournemouth
1886-06-26/-28 of Bournemouth
1891 of West Knoll, Holdenhurst, Bournemouth, Hampshire, living with family, a cook, a parlour maid, and a housemaid; with a visitor RG 12/901 f137 p62
1899-07-14/-19 of West Knoll, Bournemouth Bensham Grove visitors' books
1901 of "West Knoll", Tregonwell Road, Bournemouth, living with husband, two daughters, son, cook, housemaid, and parlourmaid RG 13/1040 f96 p51
1901-06-01/-06 of West Knoll, Bournemouth; stayed at Bensham Grove Bensham Grove visitors' books
1902-11-24 of West Knoll; "fairly well" Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1903-09-26 d. Christchurch RD GRO index; 'The Story of Our Lives from Year to Year'—birthday book made by Mary Spence Watson for Caroline Richardson
  "Our dearly loved Emmie died just after Mildred and her baby arrived from Berbice." Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript


Alice Mary (Richardson) Merz 09. Alice Mary Richardson (Allie, Hope)

1846-01-16 b. 6 Summerhill Grove, Westgate, Newcastle-upon-Tyne TNA: PRO HO 107/2404 f469 p57; RG 13/4773 f112 p29; birth certificate
1846 summer family paid a long visit to John Wigham, in Edinburgh Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 5
1851 living with family at 6 Summerhill Grove, Westgate, Newcastle, with two housemaids and a cook HO 107/2404 f469 p57
1861 scholar, Polam Hall, St Cuthbert’s, Darlington RG 9/3680 f20 p33
1863-07-20 of South Ashfield Mosscroft visitors' book
1864-02-20/-27
1864-04-12 bridesmaid at brother John's wedding Richardson (1911), p. 181
1865-07-03 left with Elizabeth Spence Watson and Emmie Richardson for tour in Switzerland Robert & Elizabeth Spence Watson: Ms journal of their wedding tour, now at Tyne & Wear Archives Service; Robert Spence Watson (1969) Reminiscences of the late Rt Hon. Robert Spence Watson. York, privately printed, p. 43
1865-11-03/-04 stayed at Mosscroft Mosscroft visitors' book
1865-12-31/1866-01-01
1866-04 spent a week with Car, Anna, and Elizabeth & Mabel Spence Watson, at Heugh Folds Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1867 spent the summer in Switzerland and Italy, with most of the family Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 205; Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1868-04-29/-30 of South Ashfield; stayed at Mosscroft Mosscroft visitors' book
1868-05-18 of South Ashfield
1869-04-09
1869 autumn toured in Germany with Robert & Elizabeth Spence Watson, Herbert Watson, and a friend Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1869 visited Dresden and Nuremburg Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 248
1870-05 stayed with the Spence Watsons; Dr Merz also staying with them Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1870-05-21/-06-24 of South Ashfield; stayed at Mosscroft Mosscroft visitors' book
1870-09 visited Hamburg with Robert, Elizabeth & Herbert Watson Spence Watson (1969), p. 47
1871-01-07 of South Ashfield Mosscroft visitors' book
1871 not found in census  
c. 1872-01

The very day after this supper, Allie was out riding with Robert, when her horse, a very spirited one ran away with her. She kept her seat grandly, but the horse would not be pulled in, & at the top of Westgate Hill, the corner of Elswick Lane, in nicely trying to turn it round, it came down with a crash. Allie was thrown over it, & received some severe bruises on her face. Robert soon came up in great alarm, & got her conveyed home in a cab. Her face was much hurt, & she had to stay about 10 days in bed, but the wounds healed far more quickly than we had expected, & under our good Dr Wilson's care she soon rallied. [ . . . ] As soon as Alice was sufficiently recovered, she and Mother went to Bournemouth where Anna & Carrie were, & stayed there some time.

Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1872-05

Mother, who had come up from Newcastle, & Allie, had left that morning for Kreuznach, where they have gone to be with my sister Nellie who has been all the winter at Montauban, but is not I am afraid yet much better. We earnestly hope the baths at Kreuznach may restore her to health.

1873-01-01 stayed at Mosscroft; "first night in single room" Mosscroft visitors' book
     
1873-09

Robert & my sister Allie & my brother John & I set off for Switzerland at the end of August. We went by Southampton, spending a few happy hours (Alice & I) at Bournemouth on the way, with Gregory & Emmie & the darling children in their sweet home. We were three weeks away, at Geneva, Sixt, Champéry, Siou, Evolena & Zermatt, & home by Neufchatel & Paris. John had such a severe attack of asthma at Sixt that he left us & went to Geneva, but, rapidly recovering, he happily rejoined us at Zermatt. Robert & he went up Monte Rosa. My feet were too sore for me to do any climbing, so Allie & I contented ourselves with going round by the vallies, while R. took the high passes.

Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1873-09-26

Immediately on our return home, an event took place wh has given us all the greatest joy. This is, the engagement of our dearest friend Dr Merz to our darling sister Alice. Although we were not unprepared for it, it came with a wonderful suddenness at last, & it still seems almost too good to be true. The engagement gives universal satisfaction & dearest Mother, who is rather better just now, enters fully into the subject, & says she has "nothing but peace in the thought". To Robert & to me it is a joy indeed—that two people, dearest of sisters & best of friends—should be united in the holiest & happiest of unions, is cause for true thankfulness, & our earnest desire & prayer for them is, that the blessing of God may rest upon them, & abide with them always. My eyes are dim with happy tears as I write & my heart too full for words.

1873-11-19 Newcastle Monthly Meeting (men & women), held at Newcastle. Jno Theodore Merz son of Philip Merz and Charlotte his wife, the latter deceased, & Alice Mary Richardson, daughter of Edward Richardson & Jane his wife, the former deceased. Parties liberated. minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting 1867–74, TWAS MF 170
1873-12-09

Allie's marriage was fixed for the 9th of December, the silver wedding day of Theodore's Uncle & Aunt, Mr & Mrs Leisler of Glasgow. But as the old proverb so truly says "Man proposeth, but God disposeth" it was not so to be. All the festivities were arranged, the dresses prepared, the guests had long since accepted, & our dear Mother seemed much better, & entered into it all with her usual ready sympathy.

 

wedding had to be postponed, as Allie's mother died, and Theo's father was ill, necessitating his return to Worms
Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1873-12-17 of South Ashfield, Newcastle upon Tyne; m. John Theodore Merz (1840–1922), at Newcastle Friends' meeting house; witnesses Edward Richardson and Louis Leisler (Alice's brother and Theo's uncle) The Friend NS XIV.Jan:21; The British Friend; minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting 1867–74, TWAS MF 170; marriage certificate
 

On the 15th of December Theodore returned to Newcastle, having left his Father still very ill. On the 17th he & Alice were married quite quietly at the Friends Meeting house. They went through the ceremony very nicely, & after they had spoken the simple, but beautiful words of our marriage service Richard Butler gave an excellent discourse, & T. Pumphrey & Cousin Eliza prayed for a blessing on the newly married. We all adjourned after meeting to Ashfield where the wedding breakfast was provided. Besides our own family there were Mr Leisler & Dr Rottenburg, & Gertie & Johnnie Edmundson. It could not be said to be a joyful time, when joy & sorrow were so strangely mingled. At 2 o'clock the young couple left for London, thence to Dover, Cologne & Worms. They are still abroad, & we have very bright, happy accounts from them.

Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
 

The wedding, which took place at the meeting house in Pilgrim Street, was extremely quiet, the only guests beyond the family at the wedding breakfast at South Ashfield being my uncle, Louis Leisler, and my cousin, Franz v. Rottenburg, who came from Glasgow for the occasion. After the wedding we proceeded on our wedding-tour to the Continent . . . .

Reminiscences of John Theodore Merz (1922), privately printed, p. 238
Children: Charles Hesterman (Charles Hesterman Merz, 1874–1940, electrical engineer—see Oxford Dictionary of National Biography), Norbert (1877–1948), Teresa (1879–1958), Ernest Leisler (1881–1909) The Friend; The British Friend; Annual Monitor; Oxford Dictionary of National Biography; Bootham School Register (1971); GRO index
1874-02-17 played Celia in As You Like It at Mosscroft Mosscroft visitors' book
early 1874

We saw early in the year, Alice & Theodore happily settled in their very pretty house, wh R. & I had had a great share in furnishing & arranging During their long absence in Germany. Theodore's father had a long illness, & died while they were still at Worms, so that they had the satisfaction of being with him in his last hours.

Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1874-05-11 played the Duke of Albany in King Lear at Mosscroft Mosscroft visitors' book
1874-10-05 son born at 12 Regent Terrace, Gateshead-on-Tyne The Friend XIV Nov:348
1874-11-19 played the Duke of Aumerle in the family Richard II at Mosscroft Mosscroft visitors' book
1877 spring given a horse—Rosie—by her husband Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1878-03 in Spain with husband
1878-06 spent two weeks in Grasmere with her sons Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1880-12-30 arrived at the South-Western Hotel, Southampton Morning Post, 1880-12-30
1881 of The Quarries, Granger Park Road, Elswick, Newcastle; travelling RG 11/5055 f159 p17; The Friend XXI.Dec:329
1881-07-09 with family, staying at The Elders, on a visit to Newbiggin-on-Sea Morpeth Herald, 1881-07-09
1882-05 with family, took a house in Stafford Terrace, Kensington, London, for three months Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1882-07-17/-19 of Kensington; stayed at Bensham Grove Bensham Grove visitors' books
1883-04-21 of The Quarries
1888-02-24
1891 not found in census  
1892 and 1894 subscribed £1 to the Society of Friends of Russian Freedom Free Russia
1892-09-09 "First month of vacation we all went together to Hunters Inn Heddons Mouth North Devon." Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1894-11-10 "Left on Sep. 20 for Montpellier—travelling via Newhaven—Dieppe—Paris—Clermont Ferrand and Le Puy."
1896-03 "Left Nov. 15, 95, for Vevey on account of Theodore's very poor health—4 months of quiet and joy in his restoration at the Hotel Monnet where we lived en pension at 8 frs a day each [ . . . ]"
1896-04-09 present at niece Mabel Spence Watson’s wedding at Pilgrim Street Friends' meeting house; signed marriage certificate RSW Cuttings
1896-12-25 of The Quarries Bensham Grove visitors' books
1897-12

In May we all crossed via Hook of Holland to Amsterdam—Charles joining us—then we stopped in Hanover and then went on to Oderhaus The Harz [ . . . ] a very merry month at the primitive forester's house—ascended The "Brocken" and those who were able took many long walks. The pine woods glorious: Norbert photographed some vistas of these very successfully. Teresa and Ernest afterwards went to Worms—Theo and I to Frankfurt and Thaun. Heat unbearable—completely knocked me down and I was ill for weeks.

Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1898-09 "Theo and I went to Cork to see Charles and then on to Killarney with him—a most delightful week."
1898-12-17

Then we all went to Dawlish Devonshire to celebrate our Silver Wedding—Caro with us. It was a most delightful month at the Inn close to station the only disappointment that Charles could not be spared from Cork to join us. We read Sir Charles Lyell's life aloud and had many enchanting walks and excursions in the beautiful neighbourhood.

After that went on to Bournemouth and took up our abode at the Weston Hall Hotel—Theo and I and Teresa, Norbert and Ernest returned to Newcastle to work and Aunt Car stayed at West Knoll."

1899-05 "Went to Germany with Theo."
1899-12-01 with Dr Merz, had subscribed £100.0.0 to the Bootham School Building Fund The Friend XXXIX:Supplement
1900-04

Had an exquisite time in North Wales—first at the Waterloo Hotel Bettws y Coed where we read the Life of David Cox. Norbert, Teresa and Ernest climbed Moel Siabod and we took many lovely shorter walks. Charles and Norbert with us for Easter. From Bettws we went to Barmough for 1 week. Then Teresa Ernest and I home by Chester and Manchester. Theo to London: he and Charles kept there by parliamentary Bills connected with Electric Lighting.

Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1900-09-23 "End of September Charles, Teresa, Ernest and I and Jock spent a charming week end at the "Rose and Thistle Inn" Alwinton—perfect weather—colour of bracken glorious."
1900-10-10/-17 "a delightful week at Heugh Folds—Theo and I."
1900-12-25 of The Quarries Bensham Grove visitors' books
1901-02 "Went to Cambridge and saw a great deal of Ernest—he is enjoying University life and finds his lectures on Historical subjects grow more interesting." Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1901-02-02

With Nelly watched the Funeral Procession of Queen from Edgware Road—paying 5 guineas for each seat—a marvellously impressive sight—King—Kaiser and other crowned heads and the quiet and reverential sympathy of huge crowd.

1901 wife of head of household, living at The Quarries, Grainger Park Rd, Elswick, Newcastle, with sister, two housemaids, kitchen maid and cook RG 13/4773 f112 p29
1901-06

Had a delightful 3 weeks at Vevey—Teresa and Ernest with us 2 weeks—then returned to Cambridge and the rest of us came home via Germany Rothenburg an der Tauber and Colmar and Bonn very enjoyable.

Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1901-11-18 "Our stay (Norbert's and mine) at Hotel Majestic Harrogate been very beneficial."
1902-04-02

A happy holiday in Cornwall. Ernest with us most of time. Charles for 2 days and Caro the whole. Mullion, Lands End, Penzance, Malvern were our stopping places. The week in London as we went to Cornwall most interesting—hearing the "Power Bill" opposed in Com: Room of House of Commons. Charles astonished Counsel and general public who listened to his answers to cross-examination. Stayed at Metropole with R.S.W. and others—a fascinating time.

1902-07-30 "Theo and I had an enchanting week at Heugh Folds [ . . . ]"
1903-02-26 "Theo and I preparing to start for Rome tomorrow."
1903-05-02 "Theo and I had a most refreshing 7 weeks holiday: the 3 weeks in Rome a rare treat."
1904-04-20

Just returned from our 6 weeks holiday—first 3 weeks in Isle of White (Daish's Hotel Shanklin) then 2 weeks at Grand Hotel Lyndhurst. The New Forest a wonderful one—Caro with us all the time—Ernest one week at Lyndhurst [ . . . ]"

1904 of The Quarries, Newcastle; with husband, gave Frank & Mary Pollard a travelling clock, for their wedding present Mary S.W. Pollard, list of wedding presents
1904-10-29 "Theo and I had a charming week at Cromer [ . . . ]" Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1905-01-27 "Theo and I both rheumatic but otherwise well."
1905-02-04 "Then on to stay with Nelly—had a delicious week with her [ . . . ]"
1905-06-26

Theo and I had a delicious week at Lugano—ten days of enchantment in Venice and then to Worms and Ems for the cure.

[ . . . ] Came home after 8 weeks absence via "Hook" [ . . . ]

1905-12-19 "The rest of us going to Braid Hills Hotel Edinburgh for the Christmas week."
1906-01 "Went to Braid Hills Hotel Edinburgh on Friday Dec. 22, Theo and I—Teresa and Caro [ . . . ]"
1906-05

Theo and I had a splendid rest at Sidmouth (Fortfield Hotel) Caro, Mabel and Molly being in lodgings near. Theo better in health than for 2 years. After 3 weeks stay we had a very happy week at West Knoll—then to London—visiting Dora in her new home at Chobham.

1906-10-24 had spent 10 days at Matlock Bath with Theo
1907-04-11

Theo and I set off for our continental holiday—stopped at the cozy D6 The Albany and entertained very friends at Restaurants—Ernest much with us.

Crossed via Dover and Calais to Aix la Chapelle—lost both big and small luggage en route but got it back in time.

From Aachen to Works—a very nice visit there then via Strassburg and Lausanne to Milan through Simplon Tunnel. Met Nelly in Milan and next day proceeded to Perugia. A glorious week there, visiting Assisi for the day. After that to Vevey where we spent a most happy 2 weeks—Charles with us for the last 4 days—a great joy. Dr. and Madame Curtius also came as our guests to the Hotel Mounnet from Sunday to Friday. We travelled home via Paris and met pleasant people and altogether had a beautiful time. Theo very well and walking much round Vevey.

1907-06-22

Returned home after an enjoyable outing—Four delightful days in London with Nelly—then on to Bournemouth with her—where Theo joined me.

1907-10-08 "Theo and I leaving on 10th for London and Bexhill on Sea—a little autumn holiday."
1908-05-15 "Reached home after being 4 weeks at Hindhead and 2 or 3 days in London."
1909-04-05

Theo and I left for our tour abroad. Slept 3 nights at The Albany—crossed via Dover and Calais with Ernest on the 8th right through to Dijon—had good brilliant Easter there "Hotel de la Cloche" with Helen and Robin who were visiting the Samages.

From there to Vevey—3 weeks stay at Hotel Monnet. Curtiuses came for 3 days and later Charles Caro Mrs. R. and Edith. From Vevey to Innsbruck via Zurich—fine weather all the time—then via Wurzburg Darmstadt to Worms—Home via Brussels and Ostend—to Charing X Hotel—Ernest with us every evening.

Home on 18th to find Rachel here—she is lovely and good.

1909-09-16 "Been to Heugh Folds for a week with Olympia Curtius and Theo came for 2 nights: a restoring visit grand weather [ . . . ]"
1910-04-11 "Left home (Theo and I) and travelled through to Winchester which we enjoyed as the historic city was new to us."
1910-04-12 "Arrived at Crown Hotel Lyndhurst—rooms very cozy and nice."
1910-05-02 "Packing to leave Lyndhurst where we have rested for 3 weeks—tomorrow—going to London to stay with Charles."
1910-05-17

Again by Charles' gift watched from a window in Whitehall the solemn procession of King Edward's body being taken to Westminster Hall to lie in State for his people rich and poor to look at. King George and his 2 sons walking on foot behind the gun carriage drawn by 6 horses and the Dead March of Saul being played by the combined military bands most impressive. The Queens and other Royal ladies were in closed carriages: silence reigned. A grey calm day suited to the sad pageant.

[ . . . ] Our 2 weeks stay here perfect [ . . . ]

1910-05-18 "Safely home."
1910-10-29 "Just returned from Harrogate where Theo and I have been for 2 weeks resting ourselves."
1911 living with husband, daughter and sister in 12 rooms at The Quarries, Newcastle; three servants RG14PN30607 RG78PN1753 RD558 SD3 ED29 SN86
1911-04-11 "Theo and I left home for Vevey." Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1911-05-24

More than 3 weeks exquisite stay at Vevey.

[ . . . ] Then via Fribourg where we stopped Sunday to Strassburg. Hotel Rothes Haus. [ . . . ]

Then to Darmstadt Hotel zur Traube.

[ . . . ] Aftewards to Weimar to see "Goethes House"—then to Bonn to see Prof. Sell—then to Brussells crossing via Ostend on 29th—4 delightful days with C. at Whitehall Court.

1911-06-01 "We to Letchworth to see Nelly."
1911-10-20 "Theo and I returned from Bournemouth on 17th after a very pleasant week at Hotel Mont Dore."
1912-05-28

Home after our holiday. Bath restored us and we then had an exceedingly happy visit to Charles in London. From there to Aspley Guise and then to Birmingham to the Wilson Kings.

We feel growing too old for London

1912-10-18

Four delicious days at Target House and from there to Wells House Hotel Ilkley where Theo and I had a nice rest.

The hills presented anything but short walks.

We returned on 15th and are now preparing for winder duties and pleasures—and for dear Caro.

1913-05-16

We got home on Whit. Tuesday—our 3 weeks at Bath was a thorough rest tho' weather was disappointing—Charles and Stella and Mrs. de Satur motored over to see us one day. We went from Bath to stay with Charles at 2 Whitehall Court and extremely enjoyed being there. and talking of arrangements for June 18 when the marriage is to be at Lyndhurst.

[ . . . ] From London Theo and I went to Letchworth [ . . . ]

1914-05-05 "We came up from Lyndhurst where we spent 3 weeks in glorious weather on May 1st."
1914-08-01 "The European War which has begun the all absorbing and terrible topic of talk."
1914-08-14 "War with Germany and Austria makes us all very sad and anxious: and absorbs thoughts to a haunting extent."
1914-11-07

A lovely and refreshing week at 14 Melbury Rd. Everything delightful—Charles and Stella so thoughtful for our comfort. Pauline an added sunbeam.

London very dark after sundown owing to the fear of Zeppelins.

We came home the 3rd [ . . . ].

1915-01-15 "A fortnight in house with Influenza."
1915-05-14 "Theo and I came home on May 10th much restored by our 3 weeks stay at Bushey—finishing up our absence with five delightful days at Melbury Road."
1915-09-19 "Theo and I were at Skinburness Hotel for the first week of this month and were much rested—gorgeous weather."
1915-10-12 "Packing to go to Harrogate tomorrow for 1 weeks stay at Grand Hotel."
1915-10-29

Our stay at Harrogate did us much good. Now settled in for the winter with thankful minds and hearts for our many blessings. But sad losses in France are continually bringing before us the horrors of this war.

1915-12-16 "Caro and I busy with garments for War Victims. So is Nelly in her new home at Letchworth."
1916-04-09 "Theo and I preparing to go to Letchworth on 12th and from there to Bushey."
1916-05-10

We managed our 3 nights at Letchworth and much enjoyed seeing Nelly and Denis.

We were 3 weeks at Bushey which benefitted us much—a restful charming time with 2 visits from Charles & Stella and Norbert for a week end.

1916-07-10, Monday

We arrived at Heugh Folds in time to look once more on beloved Caro's face which was beautiful in death—strong and calm. Dear Edith White pale and the maid tired also. Theo and I stayed at the Prince of Wales Hotel for 10 days.

1916-10-10 "Theo and I packing for Harrogate whither we go tomorrow for a fortnight to the "Stray Hotel". Prices are rising—rising."
1916-10-23 "Found Harrogate a nice rest—Theo and I read a great deal together."
1916-12-01 "The Zeppelin brought down at Seaham Harbour was easily seen by many in Newcastle."
1916-12-17 "Preparing to leave for London on Wed. and greatly looking forward to it."
1917-01 "We had a perfect 2 weeks at Melbury Road [ . . . ]."
1917-03-21

This morning an Electric Vacuum Cleaner was brought up and explained by his Secretary and Thomson the gardener—a very complete and splendid contrivance for cleaning carpets, curtains, walls and furniture. A very valuable possession. No carpets need be taken up this year.

1917-04, Good Friday "The severity of snow storm forced us to put off going to Rayheugh for a week—roads in the country impassable and enormous drifts."
1917-05-05 "Theo and I returned from Rayheugh Farm on a bitter cold day after several very hot days. We much enjoyed our 3 weeks and the fine air and Teresa's coming twice to her Cottage."
1917-06-23

We have decided after great consideration to be at Wheelbirks from July 3rd to 18th taking 3 maids—and have the joy of Stella and the children to stay with us. Hugh R. has kindly often wished us to use his house and we shall have free vegetables and the Farm close by. The country air will be refreshing. We hope for Charles at week ends.

1917-07-20 "Returned safely from Wheelbirks. Stella and the children to Ems. Theo and I here, the 2 weeks have been most enjoyable and refreshed us all."
1918-02-27 "Theo and I got back from a pleasant 2 weeks stay at Keswick Hotel, a good rest in the beautiful hill air—did us both much good."
1918-06-29

Theo and I have had an enchanting week in Edinbro staying at the Royal Hotel and therefore having a complete rest. Much delightful intercourse with Professor Sampson and his attractive family. Now at home till July 3, when we go to Rayheugh Farm for July—shutting up this house.

1918-07-29

Theo and I returned home from Rayheugh and Stella and the children go to "Ems" on 30th. The weeks at the Farm with them and Charles for 2 week ends have been blessedly happy [ . . . ].

Teresa being with us the first ten days was a joy.

1918-09-15 "It has turned winterly suddenly—hard to bear with the restrictions enforced to coal and gas. We wear coats and furst in the house!"
1918-11-03

Had a very lovely 9 days at Keswick with Theo. it refreshed us greatly.

Returned on Oct. 31 [ . . . ]

1919-01-23 "Theodore and I planning to go to Keswick on 26th. We are tired and need a short change."
1919-03-12 "Our week at Keswick a great rest and refreshment [ . . . ]."
1919-04-04

Set off by breakfast to London and had a very delightful 5 days at Melbury Road—Then on to The Priorty, Bournemouth, Denis having bespoken a spacious room for us there. [ . . . ] Two weeks too soon passed and then we returned to Charles' [ . . . ]. Much of interest in our stay—and no fatigue with Motor Car to take us about.

1919-06-29 "Had a pleasant week in Edinbro' and satisfactory interview with Mr. Blackwood who seemed very pleased to publish again for Theo."
1919-11-02 "Back from 10 days at Keswick—refreshed and better."
1920-06-21 "Teresa and I have invested in a Pianola and are enjoying it!"
1920-10-22

Our 2 weeks at Blanchland successful and refreshing and the quiet days with my Beloved very good. He began to dictate again "A Crisis in Thought" his marvellous memory clear as ever on deep philosophical subjects

1922-03-31 obit. of Theo Merz. "Dr. Merz is survived by his widow, together with two sons, Charles Hesterman Merz, M.Inst.C.E., and Norbert Merz, and one daughter, Miss Teresa Merz, J.P." The Friend LXII:233
1920-02-14

Engaged a room at the Bridge of Aln Hotel Whittingham for April 8th. One almost trembles at our age to look seven weeks ahead with definite engagements—but we hope for this change of air while this house is being renovated and cleaned.

Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1921-02-15 "Theo and I go to Saltburn tomorrow for a ten day's change."
1921-02-27 "Back from Saltburn where we had a very pleasant stay of 10 days at the Zetland Hotel. [ . . . ] Both much refreshed."
1921-04-14

The Industrial Crisis not settled—nothing but gloom and anxiety ahead. Business topped and hampered in every direction.

Insuring our house against Civil Commotion.

1921-05-02 "Decided to push through with our plans in spite of curtailed and crowded trains and travel to Melbury Road on Wed. the 4th by 8 a.m. train."
1921-06-12

Home from a very delightful 5 weeks in the South, first at Melbury Road then to Bushey Hall Hotel where my Beloved's 81st birthday was happily spent—Charles and Stella coming there to celebrate it. Then back to Melbury Road where we drove to greet many old friends. In every way a renewing holiday.

On our return heard a burglar had got in by kitchen window, broken into study desk and stolen valuables therein.

1921-07-19 "[ . . . ] I rheumatic and all tired. Therefore Charles' Car a very big boon indeed."
1921-10-04 "Theo and I off to Saltburn."
1921-10-28

We had a most precious week at Saltburn in glorious weather.

Since return been upset with maids and very occupied.

1922-02-10 "Planning our usual Feb. outing at Saltburn from the 16th."
1922-03-03 "Theo and I had a very quiet rest at Saltburn in mostly fine weather. We both had colds which rather marred our ten days stay."
1922-04-01

I seem in a dream—cannot believe the Beloved will not be by my side again—sharing everything with me as he always did in his generous confiding way.

[ . . . ] I am thinking of going to Torquay to see Nellie.

1922-04-06

Because our darling Rachel has had a sharp attack of Flu at "Hayes Court"—Norbert and Ursula decide to take her to Torquay so this plan is an immense boon for poor lonely me—and we hope to arrive there on Monday the 10th and stay at the "Torbay Hotel."

1922-05-01

Returned from 10 days at Heugh Folds with Charles and Teresa—motored to Carlisle. Much restored by the time with C. and S.

At Torquay caught cold—but the stay there was most satisfactory as I could be with Nellie daily often twice daily: long talks together after 4 years separation.

1922-09-23

Left Heugh Folds on the 18th after a very refreshing 2 weeks there—Charles and Stella generously entertaining us all. 10 fine days—motoring to Carlisle on a glorious morning made travel home easy: it was a comfort to have C. for 1 night.

[ . . . ] Much better for Grasmere and all the comfort I had in the beauty there.

1922-12-15 "Secured rooms at the Torbay Hotel, Torquay, for Hilda Garnett and myself from Dec. 30th."
1923-04-10 made final entry in her diary
1925-10-09 had donated £10.0.0 to the New Premises Appeal The Friend LXV: Supp. 4
1926/1927 of The Quarries, Grainger Pk rd, Newcastle; tel. Central 389 British Phone Books, 1880-1984
1929/1930 of Quarries, Grainger Pk rd, Newcastle; tel. Central 389 British Phone Books, 1880-1984
1931/1933 of Quarries, Grainger Pk rd, Newcastle; tel. Newcastle 33379 British Phone Books, 1880-1984
1933-10-03 of The Quarries, Grainger Park-road, Newcastle-upon-Tyne;  d. there The Friend; National Probate Calendar; GRO index
1933-12-08 will proved at Newcastle by sons Charles Hesterman Merz and Norbert Merz; effects £8876 6s. 4d.; resworn £11,558 6s. 4d. National Probate Calendar
  Tyne and Wear Archives Service library has a copy of the "Family Notes of Alice Mary Merz" TWAS L/PA/418/4031


10. Ellen Ann Richardson (Nellie)

1848-01-25 b. at Summerhill Grove, Newcastle-upon-Tyne birth certificate; GRO index; The British Friend
1851 living with family at 6 Summerhill Grove, Westgate, Newcastle, with two housemaids and a cook TNA: PRO HO 107/2404 f469 p57
1860-10 of Newcastle; started at Castlegate Friends’ girls’ school, York The Mount School, York. List of Teachers and Scholars 1784-1816, 1831-1906 (1906) York: Sessions
1861 scholar, of the Mount school, Micklegate, York PRO RG 9/3548 f9 p18
1861-12 of Newcastle; left Castlegate Friends’ girls’ school, York The Mount School, York. List of Teachers and Scholars 1784-1816, 1831-1906 (1906)
1863-07-20 of South Ashfield Mosscroft visitors' book
1864-07-27/-30 of South Ashfield; stayed at Mosscroft
1865 spring much hurt in an accident when her chaise was overturned in Little Langdale; not fully recovered even by 1877 Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 192
1867 spent the summer in Switzerland, with most of the family Richardson, ed. (1877), p. 205
1868-05-18 of South Ashfield Mosscroft visitors' book
1870-07 had been for some months in Weimar Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1871 not found in census  
1872-05

Mother, who had come up from Newcastle, & Allie, had left that morning for Kreuznach, where they have gone to be with my sister Nellie who has been all the winter at Montauban, but is not I am afraid yet much better. We earnestly hope the baths at Kreuznach may restore her to health.

Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1873-02-03/-09 stayed at Mosscroft Mosscroft visitors' book
1874-02-17 played Rosalind in As You Like It at Mosscroft
1874-03-04 played all the apparitions in Macbeth at Mosscroft
1874-04-01 played Gratiano in Ye Marchand of Venyse at Mosscroft
1874-07 "In July during our children's holidays we spent a very happy fortnight at Grasmere with my sisters Carrie & Nellie." Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1874-07-22/-27 stayed at Mosscroft Mosscroft visitors' book
1874-11-01

"And now I come my Italy + + + are ye 'ware of me, my hills, how I yearn towards you?"

1874-11-27

My sisters Caroline & Nellie, whose home at Ashfield since our dear mother's death is now broken up—have after spending a few weeks in Newcastle, gone to Italy for the winter. We have good accounts of them from Florence & trust the warmer climate may do dear Nellie good. They are delighted with all they have seen, so far of Italy, & anticipate much enjoyment.

Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1876-03-21 "Nellie is in Italy, but is coming back soon—to go with C. to Grasmere."
1879-12-11 of Wingrove, Westgate, Newcastle; m. Arthur Heinrich Kühlmann (c. 1853 – before 1911, engineer, of Wingrove, Westgate, s. of Christoph Heinrich Caspar Kuhlmann), at Newcastle fmh; witnesses David Richardson and Fred W. Dendy marriage certificate; RG14PN7577 RG78PN371 RD136 SD1 ED8 SN391
1880-06 living (or staying) with husband in Hamburgh Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'
1881 living with husband and two servants at 13 Marlborough Cres., Acton, Middlesex RG 11/1354 f122 p46
1885-02 visited in San Remo by the Merzes; travelled with them to Frankfurt, then going on alone to Weimar to visit friends Reminiscences of John Theodore Merz (1922) Edinburgh and London: William Blackwood and Sons: 280
Child: Denys Arturo Giovanni (b. 1888, Florence, Italy; d. 1952) RG14PN7577 RG78PN371 RD136 SD1 ED8 SN391; GRO index; source misplaced
1891 not found in census  
1891-03/04 residing in Florence Reminiscences of John Theodore Merz: 282
1892-01-07 with her son, departed London for Tenerife, aboard the Kaikoura; accompanied by Elizabeth, Mabel, and Bertha Spence Watson, with Caroline Richardson UK outward passenger lists
1895-12-25 of Cullercoats Bensham Grove visitors' books
1896-09-09

During these holidays have had Nelly and her delightful boy (8 years old) staying with us. So happy with our children. Nelly taken a house at Cullercoats for 3 years.

Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1898-07-23 of Cullercoats Bensham Grove visitors' books
1898-11-19/-20 stayed at Bensham Grove
1900-10-07 of 10 The Crescent, Whitley Bay
1900-12-25 of Whitley Bay
1901 of 10 The Crescent, Whitley, Northumberland, living with a cook RG 13 4805 f116 p36
1901-02-02

With Nelly watched the Funeral Procession of Queen from Edgware Road—paying 5 guineas for each seat—a marvellously impressive sight—King—Kaiser and other crowned heads and the quiet and reverential sympathy of huge crowd.

Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1901-11-17 at Westminster
1901-12 at Cowley St. Westminster
1901-12-25 of Whitley Bay Bensham Grove visitors' books
1902-08-09

Coronation completed in a gorgeous stately impressive ceremony. Only Denis and Nelly witnessed it (of our clan).

Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1902-11-24 of London
1903-02-26 "Caro left with Nelly for the East yesterday."
1903-05-02 back in London after their journey, "safe and sound"
1904-04-20 "Nelly was in lodgings at Lyndhurst while we were in the Forest and we were much together to our mutual joy."
1904 of 38 Westminster Mansions, London, S.W.; gave Frank & Mary Pollard a fur rug, for their wedding present Mary S.W. Pollard, list of wedding presents; Mary Spence Watson's diary
1905-11-16 "Nelly better but far from strong." Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1905-12-19 "Nelly and Denis going to snow regions for their holiday."
1906-10-05 "Nelly and Denis at Karlsruhe."
1906-10-24 "Nelly in Italy and Denis at Karlsruhe."
1906-12-26 "Nelly in Rome [ . . . ]"
1907-05-19 "Nelly in London once more in her 'Flat'."
1908-01-08 "Nelly and Denis at Geneva."
1908-01-25 "Nelly at Montreux [ . . . ]"
1908-06-06

Nelly with us for 2 weeks a delightful visit.

[ . . . ] Nelly leaves us on 15th to see Denis in London as he passes through for exams at Cambridge.

1908-07-24 "Nelly and Denis in Brittany Finisterre [ . . . ]."
1908-10-07 "Nelly and Denys in England again."
1908-10-29 "Denys just settling in at "Christs Coll." Nelly in "The Old Castel Inn" near by."
1908-12-16 "Nelly and Denys gone off to Wiesbaden."
1909-01-26 "Nelly gone to Meran Tyrol."
1909-03-26 "Nelly and Denys at Minehead."
1909-08-05 "Nelly and Denys in Paris."
1909-12-16 "Nelly and Denys sleeping at "Shortlands" Letchworth for first time."
1910-05-17 "Nelly leaves Grasmere today [ . . . ]."
1911-01-12 "A delightful 10 days visit from Nelly and Denys—heard much about Letchworth life and Cambridge."
1911-03-24 a subject of Germany son's naturalisation certificate and declaration
1911 living in 8 rooms at Shortlands, Letchworth, Hertfordshire, with son and a domestic servant RG14PN7577 RG78PN371 RD136 SD1 ED8 SN391
1912-03-09 "Nelly and Denys greatly interested in their garden at Letchworth." Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1912-08-14 "Nelly and Denys left N. for Runswick Bay, D. for the Shetland Islands."
1913-01-29 "Nelly been ill at Letchworth influenza and heart trouble but better again now."
1913-03-21 "Nelly not well enough to face the journey here. We are anxious about her."
1913-05-16 "[ . . . ] Theo and I went to Letchworth and found Nelly frail after influenza—now she and Denys are at Torquay."
1913-06-12 "Nelly much better after Torquay [ . . . ]."
1913-06-13 "Packing for going South tomorrow. [ . . . ] Stay at the Russell till Monday—then Theo and I on to Lyndhurst [ . . . ]."
1913-06-18 attended Charles's wedding

"Theo and I lingered till Friday and then came to Folkstone for a week.

1913-06-27 "After a very restful week at Folkstone safely home."
1913-11-06 "Theo and I had a nice 2 weeks outing—beginning with Whitehall Court—then at Mont Done Hotel Bournemouth—then Harrogate [ . . . ]."
1913-11-25 "A delightful week's visit from Nelly."
1914-02-20 "Nellie in Tangiers with a Miss Hardy an artist friend."
1914-05-24 "Nelly painting at Letchworth—out of doors."
1914-07-17 "Nelly and Denys come north in August."
1914-08-14 "Expecting Nelly and Denys from Grasmere tomorrow."
1914-08-24 "Nelly and Denys went home."
1914-09-24 "Hear from Nelly she is changing her name—dropping the Kuhlmann. Feeling in England against Germany very bitter and unrighteous. Everyone is weighted with sorrow and anxiety."
1914-11-20 "Nelly been laid up for a week with varicose vein."
1914-12-31 "Nelly and Denys been at Letchworth [ . . . ]."
1915-04-09 "Nelly somewhat lonely at Letchworth and intensely feeling being looked upon as an Alien."
1915-06-01 "Nelly all the time at Letchworth not very strong—but sews hard for War Victims: quite wonderful the number of garments she sends to France."
1915-07-04 "Nelly failed to buy Shortlands so will have to move out in 1916."
1915-10-12

Nelly got into her new house at Letchworth and is pleased with it.

"Fairoaks."

1915-12-16 "Caro and I busy with garments for War Victims. So is Nelly in her new home at Letchworth."
1916-07-06 "Nelly abandoned idea of going to Grasmere—difficulties of permit so great and trying."
1916-08-11

I ELLEN ANNE RICHARDSON, heretofore called and known by the name of Ellen Anne Kuhlmann, residing at "Fairoaks," Sollershott, Letchworth, in the county of Herts, a natural born British subject, hereby give public notice that on the 5th day of August, 1916, I formally and absolutely renounced, relinquished and abandoned the use of my said surname of Kuhlmann, and then assumed and adopted and determined thenceforth on all occasions whatsoever to use and subscribe the surname of Richardson (which was my maiden name) instead of the said surname of Kuhlmann; and I further give notice, that by deed poll dated the 5th day of August, 1916, duly executed and attested, and enrolled in the Central Office of the Supreme Court on the 10th day of August, 1916, I formally and absolutely renounced and abandoned the said surname of Kuhlmann, and declared that I had assumed and adopted, and intended thenceforth upon all occasions whatsoever, to use and subscribe the said surname of Richardson instead of my said former surname of Kuhlmann, and to be at all times hereafter called, known and described by the surname of Richardson only.—.Dated this eleventh day of August, 1916.

ELLEN ANNE RICHARDSON

 

London Gazette
1916-08-18 "Just heard that Nelly has changed her name from Kuhlmann to Richardson. Denis did this some time ago!" Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1917-02-01 "Nellie had bronchitis. Much illness about."
1917-04, Good Friday "Hear that Nellie is laid up with swollen vein."
1917-05-17 "Nellie not strong—cannot walk more than half a mile."
1917-08-01 of Fairoaks, Letchworth, Hertfordshire son's service record
1917-12-09 "Nellie free to travel whither she likes after 3 years stationary life at Letchworth, a great load lifted from her for which we are thankful." Alice Mary Merz, 'Family Notes', typescript
1918-01-19

Nellie giving up her house for a time and moving into a Boarding House at Bournemouth.

Difficulties of rationing lead her to this step partly.

1918-04-28 "Nelly still at Bournemouth."
1918-06-29 "Nellie been in London for nine days with Denis "on leave"—and accomplishing much, so life at Bournemouth must have greatly restored her strength."
1918-09-15 "Nelly at Letchworth preparing her little house for "letting", then she returns to Bournemouth."
1918-11-03 "Nelly only feeble—still at Bournemouth [ . . . ]."
1918-11-11 "Nelly down with Bronchitis."
1919-04-04 "Saw a great deal of Nellie and in the sunshine of Easter had long talks with her on undercliff. She was better than I expected but yet far from strong."
1919-11-02 "Aunt Nellie at Torquay."
1919-11-05 "Nellie been very ill at Torquay from heart attacks—now in a Nursing Home."
1919-11-18 "Have letter from Nellie who is still quite an invalid at Nursing Home, Torquay."
1919-12-25 "[ . . . ] a shade better from Nellie who has Denis close to her at Torquay for the holidays: she bears her invalidism very bravely: does not complain—only remarks "this is what one comes to.""
1920-02-23 "Nellie still far from strong."
1920-06-21 "Nellie still at Torquay."
1920-10-01 "Denis to be married on the 3rd at Wenbury Church near Plymouth. Nellie not strong enough to go from Torquay—a big trial for her."
1921-01-23 "Nellie wheeled out sometimes to look on the sea at Torquay."
1921-03-27 "Nellie rather lonesome at Torquay. Now Denis is married she does not see him quite so often."
1921-07-19 "Nellie out of doors 10 hours a day sometimes at Torquay."
1922-01-10 "Nellie decided to move to Plymouth on trail so as to be near her children. She will go in Ambulance Motor Car."
1922-01-25 "Nellie grown nervous and has given up Plymouth."
1922-06-28 "Nellie at Torquay rather better—out in the garden till 10 p.m."
1922-10-18 "Very anxious about Nellie who is ill at Torquay—weak and suffering and no appetite. Nurse Bond writing daily reports."
1922-10-22 "Last report of Nellie a shade easier."
1922-10-26 "Rather improved reports of Nellie—but still anxious. She however likes to have letters and hear general news. Denis when able to go from Plymouth to see her, plays the violin which soothes her."
1922-11 "Nellie somewhat stronger but still on milk and egg diet with brandy."
1925-06-18 of Hatfield-gardens, St Marychurch-road, Torquay; d. Newton Abbot RD National Probate Calendar; GRO index
1925-12-15 will proved at London by son Denis John Arthur Richardson; effects £5464 13s. 10d. National Probate Calendar


11. Margaret Richardson (Maggie)

1851-07-30 b. 6 Summerhill Grove, Westgate, Newcastle upon Tyne birth certificate; birth digest
1855-05-19 of Newcastle-upon-Tyne; d. at Beech Grove, Elswick, Westgate, Newcastle, of marasmus 18 months certified (a form of severe malnutrition) death certificate; burials digest; Annual Monitor; Wikipedia
  . . . "the little pet lamb of the family—frail at the best, a flower gathered to bloom elsewhere." Pumphrey
1855-05-21 bur. Westgate Hill Gen’l Cemetery, Newcastle burials digest; Elizabeth Spence Watson's 'Family Chronicles'


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