Children of George and Margaret Binns

01. Eliza Binns

1805-12-21 b. Sunderland TNA: PRO RG 6/775; Digest of Births; RG 6/628 says 1805-12-25
1817/1819 at Ackworth; resident of Sunderland Ackworth School Centenary Committee: List of the Boys and Girls admitted into Ackworth School 1779-1879 (1979) Ackworth
1831-04-14 of Sunderland; m. John Bowron (1805–1841, tea dealer of Sunderland, son of John and Ann Bowron of Sunderland) at Bishopwearmouth, Durham; both signed; witnesses included: Henry Brady, surgeon, Gateshead PRO RG 6/202, /527; The Friend; Edward H. Milligan (2007) Biographical Dictionary of British Quakers in Commerce and Industry 1775–1920, York: Sessions Book Trust
Children: Eliza Ann (1832–1853), John George (1833–1878), Edward (1835–1890), Margaret Binns (1837–1864), Emma (1838–1922), Stephenson (1839–1878), Sarah Maria (1841–1857) Annual Monitor; The Friend; The British Friend; GRO index; censuses; RG 6/404, /1149; RG 10; FreeBMD
1841 of Villiers St, Bishopwearmouth, living with family, sister, and two female servants PRO HO 107/309/4 f13 p21
1849-02-16 of Sunderland; shareholder in the Northumberland and Durham District Banking Company Newcastle Courant, 1849-02-16
1851 grocer (4) men, of 198 High Street, Sunderland, living with family, father-in-law, a grocer's assistant, and a general servant HO 107/2397 f532 p3
1857-11-27 of Sunderland; shareholder in the Northumberland and Durham District Banking Company Newcastle Courant, 1857-11-27
1858-05-21 of Sunderland; held 30 shares in the Northumberland and Durham District Banking Company Newcastle Courant, 1858-05-21
1861-01-04 d. Leeds 1862 Annual Monitor; GRO index
 

ELIZA BOWRON,      55    4  1 mo. 1861

Bishop Wearmouth. Widow of John Bowron.

This dear friend was the daughter of George and Margaret Binns, of Sunderland, and in her experience was largely exemplified the truth of the Scripture statement, that through many tribulations we must enter the kingdom.

In 1831 she was united in marriage to John Bowron, jun. But this union was not of very long duration; she was left a widow with the charge of seven children, her beloved husband being removed by death after a few days' illness. In his case was strikingly evinced the power of Divine grace to make both a short and an effectual work; "I have had," said he, "a strong will to break down; but it is completely broken, and I am now become as a little child." Old things were indeed done away, and all things had become new, and all things of God, who had reconciled him unto himself by Jesus Christ.

After this afflictive bereavement, Eliza Bowron was called upon to resign first her eldest then her youngest daughter. But though again brought into deep mourning she sorrowed not as those who are without hope; for abundant evidence was afforded that the precious lambs had been safely gathered into the Saviour's fold of everlasting rest and peace. The following extract from a letter written to her surviving children after the loss of her first-born instructively depicts her own resignation, and the solicitude she felt for those who still claimed her maternal care.

"My dear children,

"I hope that ere this your minds are pretty much composed, and that you are endeavouring to feel after resignation to the Divine will, as bereavements such as these are intended for our instruction. I long that it may be the means of stimulating us to press forward more earnestly towards the mark for the prize laid up in store for the righteous. Nature is weak, and we cannot but feel the pangs of separation, but I should be sorry if you gave too much way to regret. Rather, my dear children, endeavour to cast your cares and sorrows upon that compassionate Saviour, who was himself touched with a feeling of our infirmities, and whose love can make even the hearts of little children to rejoice. I believe you are neither of you strangers to the spirit of prayer; be not afraid then to draw near to Jesus and ask of him to grant you the consolations of his love, and that he will be pleased to guard you from temptation."

This dear friend was one of the sufferers by the failure of the District Bank, which swept away the little savings of many previous years, and left her almost penniless. Yet, amidst these accumulated trials, she was mercifully supported, and evinced an humble trust in the love and protecting care of her heavenly Father. Faith was given her to believe that whom the Lord loveth he chasteneth, and she was enabled resignedly to bow to his chastening hand; nor were seasons wanting when she was permitted to feel that His love was shed abroad in her heart by the Holy Spirit. Accustomed to look away from the things that are seen to those which are not seen, she writes during a time of peculiar trial, "What poor creatures are we. Had we all sunshine, some of us, I fear, would cling too eagerly to earth and its enjoyments, and so perhaps, lose sight of the joys that are eternal. So let us endeavour to be content, that we may be enabled to adopt the language, 'For all I bless thee—most for the severe.'"

She was subject to frequent indisposition, and her weak frame, eventually gave way under the pressure of bodily and mental conflict, so that she was laid upon a bed of sickness. In the early part of her illness, and occasionally during the course, she was much tried with doubts and fears; the enemy was permitted to come in like a flood, and sorely to buffet her, so that she said she felt deprived of "all sense of good." But at other seasons she was given to know that even the adversary cannot go beyond the length of his chain, and, favoured to feel Him to be near who is "mighty to save and able to deliver," she would, with clasped hands, call upon Him as her "adorable Redeemer."

One one occasion, after prayer had been offered on her behalf, she exclaimed: "What should I do if the work had to be begun now?" And, at another time, when under concern for her dear children, on being encouraged to cast all her care upon Him who had so often been her support in the hour of need, she added, "He has been a husband to me." Two days before her decease, the enemy was permitted again to assail her; but she expressed a hope that she would be supported, and said that during the previous night she had some precious promises brought to her remembrance; and it seemed as though the loved ones were waiting to receive her, so that she was almost impatient to be gone. "I have had," she said, "to go down to the bottom of Jordan." And on the stones of memorial which are brought up from thence being alluded to, she sweetly responded: "Well, I may say, 'Hitherto the Lord hath helped me.'"—"O that my tongue were loosened, and strength given to tell of his wondrous works!"

She was very grateful for all the kind offices of her attendants; but, in reply to an encouraging remark, she significantly pointed to "the great Physician," who alone could effectually help her. On having something to drink handed her, she exclaimed, "O to be where there shall be no more hunger and no more thirst, where He shall be to me a place of broad rivers and streams!" In allusion to some of the last efforts of the "unwearied enemy," she said, "I hope he will not be permitted to prevail;" and on one of the "exceeding great and precious promises" being brought into view, she rejoicingly exclaimed, "I have no fear!" Soon afterwards her purified spirit peacefully took its flight, it is reverently believed to be for ever at rest in Jesus.

1862 Annual Monitor


Ann (Binns) Peacock02. Ann Binns

1808-03-21 b. Sunderland TNA: PRO RG 6/628, /775
1819/1821 at Ackworth School; resident of Sunderland Ackworth School Centenary Committee: List of the Boys and Girls admitted into Ackworth School 1779–1879 (1879), Ackworth
1838-01-11 m. John Peacock (cal 1790–1868, miller, Grey & Peacock, of Ward Terrace, Bishopwearmouth), Bishopwearmouth Friends' meeting house; witnesses Henry Brady and Thomas Hanson; Thomas Mounsey registering officer marriage certificate; Annual Monitor; National Probate Calendar
Children: John George (1838–1838), Mary Jane (1840–1863), Edward (1841–1857), Ann Eliza (1842–1863), Emma (1849–1850) GRO index; The Friend; Annual Monitor
1841 of Murton Place, Bishopwearmouth, living with family, sister, and two female servants PRO HO 107/309/5 f14 p23
1851 living with family and a house servant at 10 Murton Street, Bishopwearmouth HO 107/2396 f292 p36
1861 corn miller's wife, of Matlock Bath, Derbyshire, with her daughter, lodging with George Radfirth, coachman, and family RG 9/2542 f33 p31
1871 annuitant, paralysed, of 2 Church Villas, Croydon, Surrey; lodger in household of Eliza Davis RG 10/3775 f18 p25
1876-07-07 of Lansdowne-road, Croydon; d. there National Probate Calendar; 1878 Annual Monitor; GRO index
1876-07-26 will proved at the Principal Registry by brother Henry Binns and brother-in-law Robert Andrew Wilson; effects under £2000 National Probate Calendar
  carte de visite reproduced with permission of the Religious Society of Friends in Britain  


Henry Binns03. Henry Binns

1810-01-19 b. Sunderland TNA: PRO RG 6/628, /775; Bootham School Register (1971)
1820/1823 at Ackworth; resident of Sunderland Ackworth School Centenary Committee: List of the Boys and Girls admitted into Ackworth School 1779–1879 (1879), Ackworth
  . . . "as a schoolboy he was wayward and difficult. As a senior scholar he was appointed to a position of trust, not because he merited it but in the hope that he would respond to responsibility and this proved to be the case." Dictionary of Quaker Biography
prior to 1829 attended Lawrence Street school, York Bootham School Register
  arranged in conjunction with John Bright and George Mennell to run away from school to America, but was caught when leaving premises and plan frustrated Edgar B. Collinson, ed. (1935) Bootham School Register, 2nd edn
 

Both his parents died before he was twenty and a great deal of care and responsibility devolved upon him. As he grew to manhood he became conscious of a deep conviction of sin and felt the need of faith in the loving mercy of God, but it was not until many years later that he became a minister of the Society.

DQB
1834 at High St, Bishopwearmouth. [Pigot's Directory of Sunderland] John Binns and Abigail King Family, accessed 2010-12-20
1834-05-14 1 of 2 reps from Sunderland at Newcastle Monthly Meeting held at Sunderland minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting, Tyne & Wear Archives Service MF 169
1836-09-22 draper of Bishopwearmouth; m. 1. Elizabeth Bowron (1810–1855; daughter of John Bowron, tea dealer of Sunderland, and Ann Stephenson), Bishopwearmouth; both signed; witnesses included William Rowntree, maltster, Gateshead; Ingram Chapman Watson, umbrella maker, North Shields RG 6/202, /527
Children: Henry (Sir Henry Binns, KCMG, 1837–1899, politician in Natal—see Oxford Dictionary of National Biography), Rachael (1838–1838), Joseph John (1839–1922), Margaret Ann (1841–1909), Eliza (1842–1907), Emma (1844–1850), George (1845–1846), Charles (1847–1847), Edmund (1848–1919), George William (1850–1887), Alfred (1851–1852), Arthur (1853–1855) David Binns gedcom; Brian Davey: Thistlethwaite CD; Oxford Dictionary of National Biography; censuses; Edward H. Milligan (2007) Biographical Dictionary of British Quakers in Commerce and Industry 1775–1920, York: Sessions Book Trust; The Friend; The British Friend; Annual Monitor; RG 6
1839/1844

. . . a deeply committed Quaker and an active member of the British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, and he advertised his refusal to sell ‘any goods manufactured from cotton not warranted to be free labour grown’, giving his customers the opportunity to strike an ‘effectual blow to the traffic so opposed to the services of religion and humanity’ (advertisement, Binns MSS). Nevertheless, the business prospered and moved to larger premises on the other side of Bishopwearmouth’s high street in 1844. Binns’s opposition to slavery was a reflection not just of his religious principles but also of his political views, which embraced further constitutional reform and the repeal of the corn laws. Through Quaker circles in Newcastle upon Tyne he knew John Bright before the Anti-Corn Law Association was founded in 1839, and he and his brother George were involved in the growing protest movement, helping to form the Durham branch of the National Charter Association in 1838. George and James Taylor, his partner in a local bookshop, were the most active, printing tracts, handbills, and posters and speaking throughout the north-east. Both were arrested in 1839 along with other Chartist leaders, but they continued their activities until their trial in summer 1840. George Binns was imprisoned for six months, and Henry himself was briefly detained with Bright but was not put on trial.

Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
1841 draper, of High St, Bishopwearmouth. [census] John Binns and Abigail King Family [this entry is likely enough, but I've not been able to locate in the census itself]
1841 house and shop at High St, Bishopwearmouth. [poll book] John Binns and Abigail King Family
1842/1843 house and shop at 173 High St, Bishopwearmouth. [poll book]
1843

Henry Binns was involved in Bright’s attempt to stand against Lord Dungannon for the Durham parliamentary seat in March 1843, his bid to be nominated for the Sunderland seat, and his eventual election for Durham in July. Unlike some Quakers, Binns did not break with Bright over his opposition to the Anti-Slavery Society’s call for tariffs on goods produced by slave labour.

Oxford DNB
1843-02-22 advertised in The British Friend (Feb & Mar) for situations for two young female Friends, one as a companion or housekeeper ‘in a family where the duties are not very laborious’, the other as nursery governess  
1844-01 agent in Sunderland for The British Friend The British Friend
1844-04 advertised in The British Friend for situation for a young woman Friend as a nursery governess; and "wanted, an Experienced Friend, about 30 years of age, competent to take the management of a general Grocery Business".
1847-06-11 present at a meeting of the Liberal electors of Sunderland, at the Bridge Hotel Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury, 1847-06-12
1848-09 of Sunderland; advertised in The British Friend that "A Young Man Friend, who will be out of his apprenticeship in the 11th Month next, will then be at liberty to accept a situation, as assistant in the Tea and Grocery Trade. Also required, a Situation in same trade, for a youth, aged fifteen years, recently come from Ackworth." The British Friend
1850-04-25 took part in meeting of Northumberland & Durham Friends’ Temperance Union, at Sunderland The British Friend VII.7:169, July 1850
1850 linen and woollen draper at 173 High St, Bishopwearmouth. [Ward's Northumberland and Durham directory] John Binns and Abigail King Family
1851 draper employing 3 men, of 173 High St, Bishopwearmouth; also present were two male draper's assistants, ages 27 and 19, and two female servants aged 19 and 13 PRO HO 107/2396 f330 p64
1855 linen draper, 136 High St, Bishopwearmouth, residence 12 John St., Bishopwearmouth. [Ward's Directory, Newcastle] John Binns and Abigail King Family
1855 linen and woollen draper at 173 High St, Bishopwearmouth. [Slater's Directory, Sunderland]
1856 & 1858 abode at John St., house and shop at 173 High St and 12 John St, Bishopwearmouth. [Register of Electors]
1861 linen draper, of 12 John St, Bishopwearmouth; household included a cook and a housemaid RG 6/3776 f22 p38
1862-04-01

We learn that our friend Henry Binns, of Sunderland, in accordance with the minute granted him by Newcastle Monthly Meeting, in 2d month last, has held public meetings at Stockton-on-Tees, Middlesbro’, Ayton, Hartley, Houghton-le-Spring, North Shields, and Newcastle. The attendance on most occasions was good. At the meeting at Hartley our friend was accompanied by Charles Brown, of North Shields. By previous invitation they took tea at the house of a pitman, who was one of those who were brought to bank a few minutes before the awful catastrophe took place. Some religious counsel was extended to him and his family, and it proved a solemn and affecting occasion. The meeting which followed was, as might have been expected, from the stripped state of the village, not a large one; but the poor people, suffering under their late bereavements, were open to receive the communications of our friends, and the meeting was held to satisfaction. At Houghton, no meeting of Friends had been held for a period of twenty years, but the people were remarkably quiet, and the attendance, considering the inclemency of the evening, pretty large.

The British Friend p. 86
1862-05-01

Our dear friend, Henry Binns, of Sunderland, accompanied by Edward Backhouse, in further prosecution of his religious services, held a public meeting at Aysgarth, on the 25th of 3d month. They were at Richmond Monthly Meeting, held at Bainbridge the following day; and held a public meeting there in the evening, which was well attended. On the 27th, they held a public meeting in the closed meeting house at Hawes, when a numerous company assembled. They also had meetings at Norton, Staindrop, Cotherstone, Crook, Blackhill, and Shotleybridge. These meetings were, we believe, sensibly owned by the Divine presence, and will, we trust, be productive of good.

The British Friend p. 114
1862-06-11

At Newcastle Monthly Meeting, held at Shields on the 11th of Sixth Month, Henry Binns returned the minute granted to him in Second Month, liberating him for service amongst those not in membership with Friends, within the compass of Durham Quarterly Meeting. Seventeen meetings had been convened for the furtherance of the object of his mission. He was liberated for similar service, within the limits of Yorkshire Quarterly Meeting, with liberty to hold additional meetings in his own Quarterly Meeting, if he felt it to be required of him.

The Friend 1862-07-01, 1862-08-01 p. 198
1862-07-01 "Henry Binns, of Sunderland, was at York Quarterly Meeting on the 24th and 25th of 6th month, with a minute from his Monthly Meeting, liberating him for religious service in Yorkshire." The British Friend p. 168
1862-07-04 participant in a conference at Ackworth to consider Scripture-reading meetings The British Friend 1862-08-01 p. 190
1863-01-01 among those appointed by YM to visit London & Middlesex QM The Friend p.10
1863-11-02

[Present] at the Meeting of Ministers and Elders, held at Croydon on Sixth-day, the 9th of Tenth Month. In the evening of the same day, they met the Friends of Croydon in a social gathering at the Meeting-house. They visited the family at Croydon School on Seventh-day the 10th, and spent a considerable part of the day in the institution. In the afternoon, Henry Binns was called away to the north . . .

 
The Friend p.267
1864-04-13 "At Newcastle Monthly Meeting, held at North Shields, on Fourth Month 13th, Henry Binns was liberated to attend Dublin Yearly Meeting, and for other religious services in Ireland." The Friend IV.110, 1864-05-01
1864-04-27/30 at Dublin Yearly Meeting—spoke a few times The Friend IV.133, 1864-06-02
1864-05-02

Henry Binns, of Sunderland, arrived in Ireland, on the 23d of 4th Month. He attended First-day morning meeting in Dublin, and a public meeting in the evening, at 7 o’clock, which was well-attended; those present seemed attentive.

The British Friend 1864-05-02, p. 114
1864-06-02

Since our last report, Henry Binns, of Sunderland, has held public meetings in our meeting-houses as follows:— on the 6th of Fifth month, at Churchtown; on the 8th, at Kilconner; on the 9th, at Edenderry; on the 10th, at Monkstown; and on the 11th, at Wicklow. The attendance at these meetings was small. H.B. attended several of our usual meetings as they came on course.

The Friend IV.130, The British Friend p. 150
 

He was also at our usual meetings of Kilconner (First-day), Dublin (Third-day) Monthly Meeting, and Wicklow (Fifth-day). Henry Binns left Kingston same evening for England.

The British Friend p. 150
1864/1865 abode Park Place West, shop at 173 High St, 12 John St, Bishopwearmouth. [Register of Electors] John Binns and Abigail King Family
1865-10-25 of West Croydon (late of Sunderland) daughter’s marriage announcement in The Friend 1865-11-01, p. 252
1866-04-14 among large gathering of London Friends assembled at Devonshire house "to consider the claims of the poor of the metropolis on their religious sympathy." HB "expressed a warm interest". The Friend VI.65:85, The British Friend 5:113
1866-06-07 gentleman; m. 2. Emma Andrews (1818–1868; daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth (Pallister) Andrews) at Cotherstone Oxford DNB; Milligan (2007); marriage certificate
1866-12

Our friend Henry Binns, of Croydon, in conformity with the minute granted him by Kingston Monthly Meeting, held a public meeting at Peel meeting-house on Third-day the 25th of 9th Month, and on the 30th one at Ratcliffe. On First-day the 7th of 10th Month he held another at the Bedford Institute, and on the 9th a meeting in the school-room, No. 10 Red Lion Street, Clerkenwell, and on the 16th one in the Literary Institute, Portman Square; 28th of 10th Month, in the morning, a meeting at Field Lane, and in the evening one in the mission-house, Nicol Street, Shoreditch; on the 9th ult. a meeting at the Mechanic’s Institute, Chancery Lane; on the 11th a public meeting at Ratcliffe meeting; and on First-day the 18th a meeting in the Victoria Theatre, when upwards of 3500 persons were present.

The British Friend XXIV.12:300
1867-02-27 London Gazette: Member of Metropolitan and Provincial Bank, residence 2 Albert Villas, Lansdown Road, Croydon, gentleman John Binns and Abigail King Family
1867-06-25 of Croydon; letter of this date published in The Friend VII.8:197  
1867-06

During the past month our friends Henry Binns and Wm. S. Lean have held two meetings in Exeter Hall [London]. They were satisfactory occasions, although there were not so many present as could be wished.

The British Friend XXV.6.154
1868-02-27 London Gazette: Member of Metropolitan and Provincial Bank, residence 2 Albert Villas, Lansdown Road, Croydon, gentleman John Binns and Abigail King Family
1868-03-23 At Kingston Monthly Meeting, held at Croydon 23rd of Third Month, Henry Binns was liberated for religious service in Scotland, and the holding of public meetings amongst others The Friend VIII.5:140
  The British Friend 4:90 says it was also to attend General Meeting in Edinburgh  
1868-04-06 gentleman, of 2 Albert-villas, Lansdowne-road, Croydon; co-executor of the will of his brother-in-law John Peacock National Probate Calendar
1868-05

In prosecution of the service in Scotland, for which, as was recently stated, a minute had been granted to Henry Binns, of Croydon, we learn that he left home on the 13th ult., accompanied by Joseph Steele, and proceeded direct to Aberdeen, attending meeting there, and at Kinmuck; also at Perth and Dundee, as well as having meetings for the public in these places, and a number of others were no Friends reside. They were at Glasgow forenoon meeting on the 26th, and had a meeting for the inhabitants same evening. Subsequently they have been holding public meetings in adjacent towns, expecting next week to go eastward, via Lanark towards Edinburgh, with the view of being at the Two Months’ Meeting there on the 9th current, and the General Meeting for Scotland, also to be held in that city on the 11th. Sunday meetings for the public in the neighbourhood are expected to complete the engagement.

The British Friend XXVI.5:119
1868-06

Since our last, Henry Binns, accompanied by Joseph Steele, completed his religious service in Scotland, having had meetings for the public in Dumbarton, Renfrew, Greenock, Paisley, Irvine, Kilmarnock, Lanark, Leith, Dalkeith, Kirkcaldy, and Dunfermline. They attended the General Meeting for Scotland, held in Edinburgh on the 11th ult., Henry Binns returning southward same day.

The British Friend XXVI.6:163
1869-01 movements noted The British Friend XXVII.1:15
1869-02 had subscribed 10s. in aid of the Syrian schools The Friend NS IX.98:30
1869-02-25 "At Kingston Monthly Meeting, held on the 25th of Second Month, Henry Binns and William Robinson, of Croydon, were liberated to pay a visit in Gospel love to Friends and others in the Yearly Meetings of Iowa and Canada."

London Gazette: Member of Metropolitan and Provincial Bank, residence 2 Albert Villas, Croydon, gentleman

The Friend NS IX.98:67

John Binns and Abigail King Family

1869-05-18 spoke at Yearly Meeting, announcing intention of visiting Canada and Iowa The British Friend XXVII.6:129
1869-07-15 "Henry Binns and William Robinson, with minute from Kingston Monthly Meeting, were at Rochester on the 15th; next day they attended the Quarterly Meeting held at Maidstone." The Friend NS IX.97:21
1869-09 "William Robinson and Henry Binns left Liverpool by the Cuba, for New York on Seventh-day, the 14th of Eighth Month; the vessel was reported as arriving there on the 24th as expected." The Friend NS IX:105:221; more on this, and in 106:244, 107:267, 108:295
1869-10 movements noted The British Friend XXVII.10:248
1870-02 extracts from William Robinson’s journal, on his work with HB The Friend NS X.Feb:45-7
1870-02-26 London Gazette: Member of Metropolitan Bank Limited, residence 2 Albert Villas, Lansdown Road, Croydon, gentleman John Binns and Abigail King Family
1870-03 detail of movements in Canada The British Friend XXVIII.Mar:65
  paid pastoral visits in Great Britain, and, with William Robinson, to some parts of USA, including Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin and to Canada Collinson, ed. (1935)
1870-03-19 arrived back at Liverpool The British Friend XXVIII.Apr:89
1870-05 at Nottingham with William Pollard The British Friend XXVIII.May:115
1870-06 at London Yearly Meeting The Friend NS X.June:119-35
1870-07

Henry Binns, of Croydon, has recently been engaged in religious labours amongst Friends and others in Derby, Notts, and Lincoln. William Pollard, of Reigate, joined him therein at the Quarterly Meeting held at Lincoln on the 16th ult., where they held a public meeting the same evening, and thence proceeded to Spalding, Gedney, and Broughton meetings. After this Henry Binns intended to return home.

The British Friend XXVIII.July:176
1870-08-25

At Kingston Monthly Meeting, held at Croydon, 25th Eighth Month, Henry Binns returned the certificate issued in the Third Month for service in Derby and Nottingham Quarterly Meeting. In addition to visiting the meetings of Friends, H.B. had also held thirteen public meetings, in the Town Hall at Lincoln, at Derby, and other places. In this visit he was joined by W. Pollard, of Reigate.

The Friend NS X.Sept:227
1870-08

Henry Binns and William Pollard, feeling they had not completed their service in the Quarterly Meeting of Derby, Lincoln, and Notts, have been holding meetings for Friends and those not in profession with us, at the following places, i.e. Derby, First-day the 14th; Chesterfield, 15th; Bakewell, 16th; Monyash, 17th; Ripley, 18th; Heanor, 19th; Retford, First-day 21st; Spalding, 22d; Gedney, 23d. They also attended the week-day meeting at Fritchley with those not in unity with the body, nor recognized by the Monthly Meeting in the compass of which they reside.

more on HB.
The British Friend XXVIII.Sept:228
1871-02 movements The British Friend XXIX.Feb:36
1871-02-25 London Gazette: Member of Metropolitan Bank Limited, residence 2 Albert Villas, Lansdown Road, Croydon, gentleman John Binns and Abigail King Family
1871-03 movements The Friend NS XI.Mar:73
1871 retired draper, of 2 Albert Villas, Lansdowne Road, Croydon, Surrey, living with family, two general servants, and two visitors RG 10/844 f32 p57
1871-04 movements The British Friend XXIX.Apr:84
1871-05 The British Friend XXIX.May:110
1871-06 at London Yearly Meeting The British Friend XXIX.June:128-38
1871-07 movements The Friend NS XI.July:182, The British Friend XXIX.July:172
1872-02 The British Friend XXX.Feb:38
1872-02-29 London Gazette: Member of Metropolitan Bank Limited, residence 2 Albert Villas, Lansdown Road, Croydon, gentleman John Binns and Abigail King Family
1872-07 movements The British Friend XXX.July:176
1873-01 The Friend NS XIII.Jan.20-1, The British Friend XXXI.Jan:12
1873-05-22 at London Yearly Meeting The Friend NS XIII.June.121
1873-11 has been engaged in London during past month The Friend NS XIII.Nov:284
1874-05-19 spoke at LYM The British Friend XXXII.June:134
1874-05-21 The Friend NS XIV.June:114
1874-08-03/04 of Croydon; spoke at conference of Friends’ First-day School Association at Darlington The Friend NS XIV.Aug:219, 225, 240, The British Friend XXXII.June:242
1874-10 with others visiting Norfolk, Cambridge & Hunts. QM The Friend NS XIV.Oct:319
1875-05-19, -21, -22 spoke at LYM The British Friend XXXIII.June:123, 129, 141
1876-02-26 London Gazette: Member of Metropolitan Bank Limited, residence 2 Albert Villas, Lansdown Road, Croydon, gentleman John Binns and Abigail King Family
1876-05-25, -30, -06-02 spoke at LYM The Friend NS XVI.June: 137, 146, 152
1876-06-07 of Croydon; at Chesterfield MM at Matlock The British Friend. XXXIV.Aug:221
1877-05-23/24 spoke at LYM The Friend NS XVII.June:159, 160, 170
1877-05-24 spoke at Women’s YM The Friend NS XVII.June:180
1877-06-01 signed will, with specific legacies totalling £2018 Binns Family Newsletter 6; John Binns and Abigail King Family
1877-07-04 of Croydon The Friend NS XVII.Aug:239
1876-07-26 gentleman, of Lansdowne-road, Croydon, Surrey; co-executor of the will of his sister Ann Peacock National Probate Calendar
1878-05 had been at Durham QM The Friend NS XVIII.May:112
1878-05-22, -28 spoke at LYM The Friend NS XVIII.June:127, 144
1878-05-27 spoke at Annual Meeting of Friends’ Tract Association, the Old Meeting House The Friend NS XVIII.June:159
1878-07 visiting meetings at Liskeard, St Austell, Redruth & Falmouth The British Friend XXXVI.Aug:212
1879-01-16 at the first meeting of the creditors of the bankrupt Edmund Octavius Gilpin, Henry Binns of Croydon submitted proof of Gilpin's debt to him of £789 19s. 11d. Nottinghamshire Guardian, 1879-01-17
1879-02-26 London Gazette: Member of Metropolitan Bank Limited, residence 2 Albert Villas, Lansdown Road, Croydon, gentleman John Binns and Abigail King Family
1879-04-29/ 31+ spoke at Dublin YM The British Friend XXXVII.June:150–1
1879-05-22 spoke at LYM The Friend NS XIX.June:158
1879-09–10 visiting Kent The British Friend XXXVII.Nov:268
1880-01-17 a minister, d. at his residence, 62 Lansdowne Road, Croydon National Probate Calendar; The British Friend XXXVIII. Ads, Feb; GRO index
1880-02-25 London Gazette: Member of Metropolitan Bank Limited, residence 2 Albert Villas, Lansdown Road, Croydon, gentleman John Binns and Abigail King Family
1880-03-08 will proved at Sunderland by sons Joseph John Binns and George William Binns, executors; personal estate under £4000 National Probate Calendar
  "Henry Binns was very religious but narrow minded to my idea." Reminiscences of Frederick Binns
 

DQB cites, as principal sources, Annual Monitor 1881, pp. 22-29, and Testimony of Kingston MM in Yearly Meeting Proceedings, 1880, p.1.

 
  carte de visite reproduced with permission of the Religious Society of Friends in Britain  


04. Thomas Watson Binns

1811-12-15  b. Sunderland TNA: PRO RG 6/775, RG 6/628
1812-12-03 of Sunderland; d. PRO RG 6/226
1812-12-05  bur. Sunderland RG 6/226


05. Rachel Binns

1814-01-05 b. Sunderland TNA: PRO RG 6/775
1814 of Murton Street, Bishopwearmouth Brian Davey: Thistlethwaite CD; information from Alf Rogers
1832-05-12 of Sunderland; d.

PRO RG 6/226

1832-05-18 bur. Nile St, Bishopwearmouth RG 6/226


06. George Binns

1815-12-06 b. Sunderland, Durham TNA: PRO RG 6/404, /775
1826-06/1829-12 at Ackworth School; resident of Sunderland Ackworth School Centenary Committee: List of the Boys and Girls admitted into Ackworth School 1779–1879 (1879) Ackworth; John Binns and Abigail King Family, accessed 2010-12-20
  then went to Wakefield, probably with father to work with relatives in drapery business John Binns and Abigail King Family
1836 returned to Sunderland
1837-08-09 Newcastle Monthly Meeting, held at Shields, accepted his resignation minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting, TWAS MF 169
1837-10 late set up as bookseller, stationer and newsagent at 9 Bridge St, Sunderland with James Williams John Binns and Abigail King Family
 

By this time Binns had developed radical political views and with the help of his friend, James Williams, he established a Mechanics' Institute where local people could read newspapers such as The Poor Man's Guardian, The Gauntlet and The Northern Star.

For a while the two men shared the role of librarian at the Mechanics' Institute but in October they set up business as Booksellers, Stationers and Newspaper Agents at 9 Bridge Street, Sunderland. The shop sold books and newspapers and also served as a meeting place for Radicals in the town. Binns and Williams formed the Sunderland Democratic Association and the men worked closely with other Chartist organizations in the North East of England.

At the bookshop, sold tea (both were teetotallers), stationery, texts on phrenology, commerce and so on, and radical literature, including The Star and the Northern Liberator.

Roberts, Stephen (1993) 'George Binns', in Radical Politicians and Poets in Early Victorian Britain. The Voices of Six Chartist Leaders, Lampeter: Edwin Mellen; www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/CHbinns.htm, accessed 2008-09-02
 

. . . George Binns junior worked in the family business (with little enthusiasm) until about 1837, when he opened a bookshop and newsagency in partnership with James Williams. Binns and Williams participated in the growing movement for political reform and in November 1838 they founded the Sunderland Chartist Association. Their bookshop became the town’s centre for radical agitation and for the publication and distribution of tracts, handbills and poems, many of them written by Binns. The two young radicals also toured the countryside, holding meetings in support of the Chartist cause, and Binns made a great impression as a forceful orator. ‘Williams and Binns’, wrote the Chartist historian R. G. Gammage, who knew them personally, ‘kept the County of Durham in a perpetual state of agitation.’

Roth, Herbert (2002) 'Binns, George 1815–1847'. Dictionary of New Zealand Biography, updated 2002-03-18, www.dnzb.govt.nz; Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
 

Both men took a prominent part in the town's Mechanics' Institute (as secretary and librarian), local temperance affairs and politics and were among the founders of the Sunderland Charter Association in 1838. This body quickly expanded to include both an associated female radical association and the town’s first co-operative store; it also became the core for Chartist organisation in Durham as a whole. ‘Williams and Binns kept the County of Durham in a perpetual state of agitation’ recalled the Newcastle Chartist Robert Gammage. ‘There was a scarcely a day in the week that did not witness one or more meetings'.

source misplaced
 

. . . an able speaker. A Sunderland Herald reporter who often attended Chartist meetings said that 'he spoke so as everyone could understand him . . . he was a plain, noble, honest speaker.' His speeches were sometimes closely argued, sometimes humorous, sometimes based on biblical passages, and always rousing. When, at Stockton in April 1839, he asked the 2000- strong crowd if they had confidence in the government, 'there was such a shout of "no" as made the square ring . . . '

Roberts (1993)
1839-04

Binns was a supporter of William Lovett and the Moral Force Chartists. In April 1839 Binns wrote an angry letter to the Sunderland Herald after it suggested that he had made a speech in favour of Feargus O'Connor and the Physical Force Chartists.

www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/CHbinns.htm
1839-07-22 "The Sunderland magistrates were unconvinced and on 22nd July 1839, Binns and Williams were arrested and charged with attending illegal meetings and publishing a seditious handbill." www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/CHbinns.htm
1839-07-26 pleaded not guilty, and bound in a recognizance of £100, with two sureties of £50, to appear and take his trial The Standard, 1839-07-29
 

In July 1839 Binns and Williams were arrested for sedition, but were freed on bail. Their trial at the Durham assizes did not take place until August 1840, when both were found guilty and sentenced to six months’ imprisonment. They had earlier refused an offer of freedom if they pleaded guilty and promised to keep the peace.

When Binns was released from Durham gaol in January 1841, thousands of Sunderland citizens turned out to welcome him home. After a public meeting in Durham the men marched back to Sunderland.

Roth (2002); Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
 

The two men, it was alleged, had, on 15 July 1839, nearly brought about the north east's own Newport Rising. Whilst no violence had followed the meeting, it is not surprising that an anti-Chartist jury believed that certain parts of the men's speeches—Binns' assertion, for example, that 'rebellion might be  . . . quite compatible with the principles of Christian liberty' had been provocative and had failed to keep the right side of sedition.

Roberts (1993)
1840-02-29

JAMES WILLIAMS and GEORGE BINNS, of Sunderland, who were charged with sedition on the 15th of July, 1839, were liberated on their own recognizances to appear and take their trial at the next Assizes. The Learned Judge observed, that if the defendants were to fly the country in the mean time, the ends of justice would be as well met as if they had been sentenced to transportation. This observation caused much laughter in the Court.

Newcastle Journal, 1840-03-07
1840-03-11 letter of this date published, from Binns and Williams Southern Star, 1840-03-22
1840-07 both men were found guilty of attending an illegal meeting and were sentenced to six months imprisonment in Durham Gaol www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/CHbinns.htm
1840-07-31

Even with respect to the charge on which they have been convicted, Government offered, on the morning of the trial, that if the defendants would plead Guilty, and enter into their own recognizances to keep the peace, no punishment should be inflicted on them. They however persisted in going to trial and abiding the consequences. The prisoners were called up on Friday for judgment, and sentenced to six months' imprisonment.

Newcastle Journal, 1840-08-01
1840-08-01 report of trial, which had lasted twelve hours; sentence deferred Morning Post, 1840-08-01
1840-09-25 with others, indicted at Durham assizes for sedition; sentenced to 6 months and sureties Criminal Registers
 

Binns withdrew from the Society of Friends but the rejection of what he saw as society's ‘unchristian selfishness' lay at the heart of his politics. As a public orator he laced religious rhetoric with acerbic humour: 'the Tyrants . . . boast of their Wellingtons, but we have a God'. Binns was much in demand, speaking on most evenings and reportedly three times every Sunday. Attempts in May 1839 by Magistrates in Darlington, South Shields arid Stockton to prevent him addressing meetings were thwarted by shifting their location to fields beyond the boroughs' boundaries but both Williams and Binns were arrested in July, 1839. Binns especially had been prominent in agitating the county's mining communities, in anticipation of a ‘sacred month' (i.e. general strike) to enforce the Chartists' demands. Integral to this was an address the partners had published. This address, from the Council of the Northern Political Union and almost certainly written by its publishers, is among the most uncompromising statements of class hostility produced by the Chartist movement.

If you are contented to be trampled and spat upon by the Aristocracy; if you have no pity for your brothers and sisters in humbler walks of life . . . are you prepared to see your own homes in a blaze, your properly given to flames and no insurance to redeem it; yourselves [and] perhaps your wives and children shrieking to midnight outlaws for that mercy which in the day of your power you denied them?

Freed on bail, Binns and Williams continued their agitation, with Binns now the Durham Charter Association’s salaried missionary. The cancellation of the sacred month did not discourage Bums and he led the restructuring of the county's Chartist organisation into classes on the Methodist model. He was arrested during April 1840 in Darlington (technically for obstructing market traffic) and briefly imprisoned until his fine was paid by the town's Chartist Co-operative Society. Police broke up meetings addressed by him in Stockton and Staindrop during June. Williams and Binns were finally brought to trial at Durham Assizes in August. They were found guilty of sedition and sentenced to six months imprisonment with the jury recommending clemency in view of Binns' relative youth. This plea may have ameliorated the conditions in which the pair were kept, which contrasted sharply with those of Chartist prisoners elsewhere.

Whilst in prison, Binns consolidated a reputation as a poet by writing The Doom of Toil: A Poem by an Ambassador in Bonds.

source misplaced; British Library catalogue
1841-06 elected to Executive of National Charter Association, coming fifth in the poll, with 1879 votes www.chartists.net/Chartist-executives-1840-58; Roth (2002); Oxford DNB; Roberts (1993)
1841

After his release from Durham Gaol, Binns returned to his drapery business. He continued to speak and work for universal suffrage and in 1841 was nominated as the Chartist parliamentary candidate for Sunderland. The Liberal candidate was Viscount Howick, the son of Earl Grey, the man responsible for the 1832 Reform Act. Afraid of splitting the vote of the reformers, Binns withdrew. Binns contributed to Viscount Howick's victory by announcing that the Tory candidate had offered him a £125 bribe to stand in the election.

www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/CHbinns.htm
  his health had suffered during his time in prison Oxford DNB
1841-01-25 released from gaol Roberts (1993)
1841-01 The homecoming of Binns and Williams from Durham Gaol in January 1841 was the occasion of a notable demonstration, repeated at other locations in the northeast during the ensuring weeks. Feargus O'Connor, the movement's national leader, dubbed them ‘the Castor and Pollux of Northern Chartism'. However, Binns and Williams terminated their business partnership for reasons which are unclear. Roberts (1993); source misplaced
1841-01-26 partnership of James Williams and George Binns, stationers, Sunderland, dissolved Perry's Bankrupt Gazette, 1841-02-13
1841-01-30

TO THE CHARTER ASSOCIATIONS OF ENGLAND, SCOTLAND, AND WALES.

The Council of the National Charter Association, Sunderland, beg to inform the various Associations that their tried, talented, and indefatigable friend, Mr. GEORGE BINNS, is desirous of accepting the office of Missionary in any part of the country, for two months. Early applications must be made to secure his services.

Direct to the care of Mr. J. Hemsley, secretary of the Charter Association, Bridge-Street Store, Sunderland.

Northern Star, 1841-01-30
  Binns was now a national figure, having been elected to the executive of the newly formed National Charter Association (NCA) after a nation-wide poll in June 1841. He carried the Sunderland borough hustings at the general election in the same month before withdrawing from the subsequent poll. Binns gleefully exposed Tory plans to finance a serious Chartist candidate as a means of splitting the Liberal vote during. a by-election during the following September. His correspondence with Viscount Howick, the successful Liberal candidate suggests that his political views were moderating and he failed to live up to his earlier promise as a national Chartist leader, even refusing to become a full-time lecturer for the NCA. Most of his energy was now devoted to a new drapery business which failed disastrously and he was briefly imprisoned for debt. source misplaced
1841-02-02 London Gazette: Partnership between James Williams and George Binns, stationers, booksellers, and newsagents at Sunderland is dissolved by mutual consent John Binns and Abigail King Family
1841

returned to the drapery business as a partner of John Kilvinton

Roberts (1993)

PRO HO 107/321/1 f21 p38

draper, in household of John Kilvinton in High St, Sunderland
1841-07-20 public dinner to George Binns given at the Arcade-room, Sunderland Northern Star, 1841-07-24
1841-11-27 open letter "To Mr Sinclair, Secretary of the Charter Association, Newcastle-upon-Tyne" published The Odd Fellow, 1841-11-27
1842-05 arrested and sent to Durham Gaol after being unable to pay his debts www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/CHbinns.htm
1842-06-14 London Gazette: In debtors prison to be brought up at Durham Court House on July 4, George Binns, late residing in lodgings at Woodbridge Street, Bishopwearmouth, in partnership with John Kilvinton at No 66 [sic] High Street, Sunderland, as linen and woollen drapers, hatters, hosiers, and haberdashers, shoe merchants, and Merchant tailors. Also; John Kilvinton, late of Woodbine Street, Bishopwearmouth, in partnership with George Binns, at No 55 [sic] High Street, Sunderland, as linen and woollen drapers, hatters, hosiers, and haberdashers, shoe merchants, and merchant tailors. John Binns and Abigail King Family
 

He re-entered the drapery business in Sunderland with a new partner, but this venture ended in bankruptcy. He then decided to emigrate to New Zealand to recoup his fortunes, in the hope that he would soon be able to return to England. He left Gravesend on the barque Bombay in August 1842. During the voyage he wrote a 96-line poem on the subject of reform, using the metaphor of emigration to a new land:

Bear, bear me to a land,

Where hirelings cannot land

The law-protected band

Of rude marauding fraud;

Where Heaven’s blessings sweep

The universal main,

And millions do not weep

To feed a robber’s gain;

Where Famine’s iron maw

Ne’er hurries to the grave,

Ne’er crushes 'neath its law,

Ne’er buries 'neath its wave.

Roth (2002)
1842-07-30 embarked at Deptford aboard the Bombay John Binns and Abigail King Family
1842-08-01 left Gravesend Roberts (1993)
1842-08-09 London Gazette: Insolvent No 59,653 C; Assignee George Moore [John Kilvinton No 59,654 C] John Binns and Abigail King Family
1842-12-14 Arrived in Nelson, New Zealand. He obtained employment supervising a whaling establishment for a merchant who, by coincidence, was named James Williams. Soon after his arrival Binns entered into a controversy over the sale of shortweight bread, and Alfred Saunders attacked him as ‘a chartist ringleader’ in a letter to the Nelson Examiner. Binns replied indignantly:

When I came to New Zealand, it was after I had suffered imprisonment, sacrificed my business, and lost the good-will of relations, in an endeavour to free my country; and I was and now am desirous of atoning, in some measure, for my past hostilities, by a life of "peace and good-will" here. I did not expect the word Chartist would be employed against me as a term of reproach in a distant land like this. We are all united here by a community of interests, and though I am not ashamed of my principles, yet I should never render myself obnoxious by their intrusion upon others. I have nothing to do with Chartism in New Zealand, and my past enthusiasm might have been forgotten where there is no grievance to redress and no enemy to our weal.

Binns̓ response was revealing, and suggested that his departure from Sunderland had been prompted by a combination of familial discord and political disenchantment.

Roth (2002); John Binns and Abigail King Family
1842-12-17 had been one of seven cabin passengers on board the ship Bombay, signing public letter expressing confidence it its commander, James Moore Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle
1843-03-10

letter from Port Nelson:

 

We sailed from the West India Docks on the 1st of August, 1842, and arrived in the downs a day or two after. We were about a week in the Channel, encountering adverse winds one day, and a gentle and favourable breeze the next when the broad Atlantic opened to our view and left behind us the dim and distant outlines of my fatherland. We arrived in sight of New Zealand, after traversing 20,000 miles of water in about five months, and were landed (after having two for the night) in Tasmas's Gulph.

Leicestershire Mercury, 1843-09-16
early 1843 began work as a baker and butcher (though he himself had become a vegetarian) in a store built by Robert Ross Roberts (1993)
1843-09-02 signatory of letter from inhabitants of Nelson, regarding the Wairau massacre New Zealand Gazette and Wellington Spectator
  On 17 June 1843 22 Nelson settlers were killed at Wairau, along with four Māori. The settlers, under Arthur Wakefield, had tried to arrest Ngāti Toa chiefs Te Rauparaha and Te Rangihaeata, after the Māori leaders evicted surveyors from disputed land. Governor Robert FitzRoy refused to take action against the Māori, maintaining that the settlers had illegally provoked the chiefs. Binns joined with other Nelson settlers in denouncing ‘the ferocious character of the savages’ and protesting at the government failure to act. Binns, like many British radicals, did not sympathise with Māori defending their land. Instead he appears to have seen Māori as standing in the way of progress, preventing the land from going to the encroaching settlers who would supposedly make the best use of it. Clayworth
1843/1844 There were of course grievances to redress in Nelson. During 1843 the New Zealand Company’s labourers were agitating for higher wages. However, there is no evidence that Binns was involved. His name, on the other hand, appeared on a joint letter in July of the same year concerning the Wairau incident which denounced the ‘ferocious character of the savages, who, in cold blood, massacred our friends and their own previous benefactors’. A year later, in June 1844, Binns signed a petition to the House of Commons complaining about the governor’s refusal to conduct a legal investigation into the events at Wairau. Roth (2002)
1844 The whaling business failed in 1844, Williams returned to Britain, and Binns was again left with a serious financial loss. This reverse, which destroyed his hopes of an early return home, depressed him profoundly.
in NZ Annual List of Jurors described as accountant John Binns and Abigail King Family
1844-02-13 poem by James Vernon about Williams and Binns published in The Northern Star. Appears to have been written at South Molton, 1844-02-02
1844-05-18 James Williams and George Binns sign letter denying accusation by A Perry that James Williams has breached an agreement about whaling and the sale of whale oil and bones Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle
1844-06-15 clerk; among those inhabitants of Nelson petitioning Parliament for due processes of law to be applied to the parties, and especially the natives, involved in the massacre of whites at Waikanai Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle
1845 in NZ Annual List of Jurors described as clerk John Binns and Abigail King Family
1845-06-28 Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle: Advertisement for a weekly general market to be held in Nelson, on Town Acre No 220, in Bridge Street, nearly opposite the shops of Mr Binns and Mr Alder
c. 1845/1847

He found new employment in Nelson as a baker.

Roth (2002)
1846-02-07 Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle: Jury List for Nelson includes George Binns, baker, Bridge Street John Binns and Abigail King Family
1847-04-05 d. Bridge Street, Nelson, South Island New Zealand, of consumption, after three years of illness; aged 31 Roth (2002); Roberts (1993); information from Alf Rogers
1847-04-10 "On Monday 5th inst at Bridge Street, Nelson, after a lingering illness, sincerely regretted by all his friends, George Binns, aged 31, son of the late George Binns, of Sunderland." Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle
1848-01-21 Death reported in Sunderland Herald.

Many of our readers will notice with regret the death (recorded in our obituary this week) of Mr. George Binns, late of this town, who expired at Port Nelson, New Zealand, on the 5th April last. Mr Binns left England in August 1842, was seized with severe cold some time after reaching the above place, which settled on his lungs and carried him off after an illness of upwards of three years. He was much respected in the Colony, his remains being followed to the grave by nearly all the respected settlers. We need not here attend to the part Mr. Binns took in public matters within this Country, suffice to say that the political principles which he adopted, he always unflinchingly and constantly advocated. He was a young man of considerable ability and promise and his death will be much regretted by a number of sincere friends in this neighbourhood.

John Binns and Abigail King Family
1848-02-05

DEATH OF GEORGE BINNS,

THE SUNDERLAND CHARTIST.

(From a Correspondent)

Probably you have heard that George Binns is dead. Notices of his deceased have appeared in the papers of this locality, all written in terms of respect for his memory, and of esteem for his talents. From the active and noted part which he took in the people's cause, he became personally known to many of the readers of the STAR, and admired by thousands who heard of him through its pages. it is, therefore, probably you will feel disposed to insert a notice of his death.

Mr Binns was a native of Sunderland, one of a family of sixteen children, members of the Society of Friends. His father was a draper, in an extensive line of business, and was much esteemed in this town for his intelligence, integrity, and usefulness in local affairs, particularly in all movements of a benevolent character. His mother, too, was a most excellent woman. Mr G. Binns was himself brought up to the drapery business with his father, but left it about 1837, when he was between twenty-one and twenty-two years of age, and entered into partnership with Mr Williams, in the newspaper and bookselling business. Previous to quitting the drapery business, he had taken a very active part in the promotion of the temperance cause, and had engaged in several public meetings of a political character, in which he early proved himself possessed of a high talent as a speaker, and his enthusiastic nature made him most popular wherever he appeared. About this time Mr Binns lost both his parents, and the management of the business, for the maintenance of the younger members of the family, devolved upon him; but, as his inclinations were for public life, the trustees of the family property were dissatisfied with his attention to the business he had in charge, and, therefore, he quitted it, as stated, to join Mr. Williams. From 1837 to 1840 he was incessantly engaged in the advancement of his views of political and social reform. He joined the Chartist body at the earliest period, and remained in connexion with them until he quitted England for New Zealand, in 1842. In July, 1839, he was arrested at Sunderland, along with Mr Williams, on a charge of sedition, appeared, in answer to the charge, at the following Durham assizes, when his trial was postponed, and he was liberated on heavy bail. His trial ultimately came on in August, 1840, before Judge Coltman, when the usual verdict of guilty was found, and he was sentenced to six months imprisonment in Durham prison. Comparatively speaking, he had not to complain of the privations, which others had to suffer at that time, in other prisons, for similar offences. He was treated, in every respect—as were his fellow prisoners, Mr Williams, and Mr Byrne, of Newcastle—with the greatest liberality. In January, 1841, he was liberated, when he was honoured with a triumphal entry into his native town, thousands upon thousands taking that means of testifying their esteem for his character, and their disapproval of the unjustifiable prosecution which had been got up against him. Shortly after his liberation, he re-entered the drapery business, jointing a Mr John Kilvinton, who was established in business himself at the time. This was a most unfortunate connexion. From the conduct of his partner he became involved in debt. No longer able to feel that self-respect which he prized so highly, he resolved to emigrate, and endeavour, by care, industry, and enterprise, to save as much as would enable him to return to England, pay all whom he owned, and resume again that career of public usefulness in which he had acted so distinguished a part.

Shortly after his arrival in New Zealand, he became assistant to a Mr James Williams, merchant and shipowner of Port Nelson, for whom he superintended a whale fishing establishment. With this gentleman he continued doing well until the disturbances with the natives took place, when the affairs of his master became involved, and that person left the colony, Mr Binns sustaining a considerable loss by him. This new reverse of fortune, interfering as it did with Mr Binns's ardent hopes of return to his native country, produced a sad effect upon his spirits, and probably strong contributed to cause a severe cold, caught about that time, to become fixed, and to terminate, as it did, in consumption. He died after an illness of upwards of three years.

I omitted to mention that when in prison he composed a small poem—'The Doom of Toil.' It was highly popular, and had a large sale. Of his talents as a speaker and writer, you are as well able to judge as myself. I will only add what I, from most intimate knowledge of him, can best say, that he was a thoroughly true-hearted man.

He inspired all who knew him with sentiments of warm attachment, and his death ahs led to expressions of regret and sympathy from men of all ranks and of all opinions in this town.

[We must express our sincere regret to learn the melancholy intelligence conveyed in the above communication. We well remember George Binns as a handsome, high-spirited, talented, true-hearted man—every inch a Democrat. Poor fellow,

'After life's fitful fever he sleeps well.'

The poem—'The Doom of Toil,' we do not remember to have seen. The lines given below have once before appeared in the STAR, but they will bear re-publication. As the last address of the deceased patriot to his native land, they will possess a melancholy interest to those who knew him personally or by report. Thanks to our correspondent for enabling us to pay this last tribute of respect to a man whom we always admired.]

LINES BY MR GEORGE BINNS.

Written on board of the 'Bombay,' on her passage to New Zealand, August, 1842.

Away, away, away!

   And spread thy sunny sails,

The rising sun of day

   Has woke the swelling gales;

The land we've left behind

   Has vanished like a dream,

The ties that once could bind

   Lie broken on the stream,

Splendid balls of learning,

   Dazzling many an eye;

Lamps of wisdom burning,

   Lighting up her sky.

Gems of rainbow s'ory

   Gilding England's crown,

Themes of future glory

   And fabulous renown:—

All and every wonder

   Her glory and her might,

Loom like clouds of thunder

   Upon my troubled sight.

 

Sail on! we will not shrink,

   Though ocean be our grave,

Though our requiem as we sink

   Be the murmur of its wave.

For beside the splendid halls

   Of base oppression's pride,

My memory recalls

   The ruin by their side;

The soldier who was slain

   At the shrine of human lust,

The weeping widow's claim

   Oft trampled in the dust;

The tiller of the soil

   Upon whose cheek appears,

From unrequited toil,

   Deep channels of his tears:

The drops of blood that stream

   From the wearied limb

Yet fail withal to gain

   A harvest-home for him.

 

Away! my bark, away!

   Where nothing palls the night,

Mid sunny things of day

   And silent things of night;

Where, on the burnished wave

  That kisses yonder sky,

The golden sun doth bate

   Its beauty from mine eye,—

Where stars, at evening's gloom

   Emit their shining light,

And yon unclouded moon

   Half chaseth back the night;

Where daring sea-birds fly

   Along the billows' path,

Or, mounting to the sky,

   Look down upon their wrath;

Where none like me are sad—

   No eye conceals the tear,

Where human hearts are glad

   And happy faces cheer.

 

Away! brave ship in pride,

   And cleave the stormy flood,

Where sleep beneath its tide

   The noble and the good,

Bear, bear me to a land,

   Where hirelings cannot land

The law-protected band

   Of rue marauding fraud;

Where Heaven's blessings sweep

   The universal main,

And millions do not weep

   To feed a robber's gain;

Where Famine's iron maw

   Ne'er hurries to the grave,

Ne'er crushes 'neath its law,

   Ne'er buries 'neath its wave.

 

Blow! all ye breezes, blow!

   Roll! all ye waters, roll!

What matter though we go

   To Indus or the Pole!

Press on! press on, my bark!

   Though mountain billows rise,

Though starless nights are dark

   And tempests lash the skies;

We'd better hear the thunder

   And see the lightning's flash,—

Our shrouds be rent asunder,

   Our timbers creak and crack—

Than see the storm of feeling

   'Gainst tyranny rebound,

Or mark the mother kneeling,

   Her famished children round,—

Than find amidst the few,

   With plenty at command,

No spirit firm and true,

   To save my native land.

 

Northern Star, 1848-02-05; Roth (2002); Oxford DNB
  His brother Frederick Binns recalled in 1909:

The 2 best intellects in the family to my idea were George and John. The family seemed to look down upon George—because he joined the Chartist agitation—one of the family (I don’t know which) went so far as to say that he deserved transporting.’

Reminiscences of Frederick Binns
 

Supplementary bibliography

Chase, Malcolm, in G.R. Batho, ed. Durham Biographies Volume two (2002), Durham County Local History Society

Gammage, R. G. History of the Chartist movement, 1837–1854. (1894, 1969) 2nd ed. Newcastle-on-Tyne

Obit. Northern Star and National Trades’ Journal. 1848-02-05

Obit. Sunderland Herald 1848-01-21

Roth, H. (Oct 1961) ‘My quest for Binns’. New Zealand Monthly Review 2, No 17: 17-19

[J. Williams and G. Binns?]. To the Middle Classes of the North of England 1839, reprinted in Northern Liberator 1839-07-21 and in Dorothy Thompson (1971) The Early Chartists, London

Roth (2002); source misplaced


John Binns07. John Binns

1817-01-31 b. Sunderland, Durham TNA: PRO RG 6/404, /775; email to me from Dee Cook, Archivist to the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries, London, 2002-06-28, citing Candidates' Entry Book (ref: GL Ms 8241/13)
1827/1831 at Ackworth School; resident of Sunderland Ackworth School Centenary Committee: List of the Boys and Girls admitted into Ackworth School 1779–1879 (1879) Ackworth
1831-05-19 apprenticed to Mr Henry Brady of Gateshead, apothecary, for 7 years from 19 May 1831. The testimonial of his moral character was supplied by Mr Brady email to me from Dee Cook, citing Candidates' Entry Book (ref: GL Ms 8241/13)
1831-10-20 date of apprenticeship indenture
1834-09-29 The Morning Chronicle: University of London:– University College; Faculty of Medicine; Pathological Anatomy, silver medal Mr John Binns, Sunderland John Binns and Abigail King Family, accessed 2010-12-20
1837-09-13

Newcastle Monthly Meeting at Sunderland: to investigate reports that John Binns of Newcastle "has imbibed principles which are at variance with those of our society."

minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting, Tyne & Wear Archives Service MF 169
1837-10 commenced his medical training/attendance at lectures in October 1837. The lectures were: 1 session of lectures on Chemistry (taught by Graham); one session on Materia Medica (Thompson); 2 sessions on Anatomy and Physiology (Sharpey); 2 sessions of Anatomical Demonstrations (R Quain); 2 courses of lectures on the Principles and Practice of Medicine (Elliotson); 1 course on Botany (Hoblyn); 2 courses on Midwifery (Heming) and 2 at Newcastle (Dawson); 1 course on Forensic Medicine (Barnes) email to me from Dee Cook, citing Candidates' Entry Book (ref: GL Ms 8241/13)
1837-10-11 reported at Newcastle Monthly Meeting at Shields that JB has removed to Westminster MM, and shares the views of those that deny the Godhead of Jesus Christ minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting, TWAS MF 169
1838-09-12 Newcastle Monthly Meeting at Sunderland: Report on JB from Westminster. He appears to be leaning towards Unitarianism. Has returned to Newcastle. No further action for present
  joined the ranks of active Chartists in Sunderland Roberts, Stephen (1993) Radical Politicians and Poets in Early Victorian Britain, Lampeter
  He was a Chartist and helped to form a Miner’s Union. There is a bust of him in Miners’ Hall, Durham, Co. Durham Thistlethwaite CD; David Binns gedcom
1839-01-23 back at Westminster. Disowned by Newcastle Monthly Meeting held at Newcastle minutes of Newcastle Monthly Meeting, TWAS MF 169
  His brother Frederick said Henry and Charles Brady opened a draper's shop in Barnsley and John was there for a time but after there he went to London to work at Guy's Hospital John Binns and Abigail King Family
  completed 21 months' attendance at North London Hospital [written above this is 'University Col'] email to me from Dee Cook, citing Candidates' Entry Book (ref: GL Ms 8241/13)
1839-04-27 won first silver medal in pathological anatomy, University College Morning Chronicle, 1839-04-29
1840-07-25 The Northern Star and Leeds General Advertiser: Sunderland:– There was a crowded meeting of the men of this place on Thursday last, in the Co-operative Hall to hear Mr Binns deliver an address. Mr John Binns was in the chair Northern Star
1840-08-28 addressed a tea party at Stockton-on-Tees, to raise a fund for the support of the prisoners in Durham Gaol Northern Star, 1840-10-10
1840-09-12 The Northern Star and Leeds General Advertiser: Mr John Binns, appointed Provisional County Secretary of the Durham Charter Association John Binns and Abigail King Family
1840-10-03 The Northern Star and Leeds General Advertiser: John Binns of Sunderland visiting colliery villages in Durham and giving speeches Northern Star
1841 not found in census  
1843-03-02 qualified as an apothecary by taking the Licence of the Society of Apothecaries

His Licence entitled him to practise as an apothecary "in the country" which meant anywhere in England and Wales except the City of London and within 10 miles of it. (The provincial Licence was cheaper.) A ruling in the House of Lords in March 1703/4 had put an end to a key, three-year lawsuit (known as the Rose Case) when the Lords ratified an apothecary's right both to prescribe as well as to dispense drugs—and so the General Practitioner (of Medicine) was born. Qualifying as an apothecary was thus the equivalent of becoming a GP today (the definition of an apothecary being "a doctor who dispenses his own medicine"), although from about 1820 to 1865 most medical practitioners took both the MRCS and the LSA (known colloquially as "the College and the Hall") in order to gain full, all-round competence. As a result of the Apothecaries' Act of 1815, noone could practise as an apothecary in England and Wales without holding the Licence, hence Binns had to come to London to be examined at Apothecaries' Hall. The examination was purely an oral ordeal until the 1860s, when some written papers were introduced.

 

examined by one of the twelve members of the Society's Court of Examiners, Mr Dickinson, and approved on 2 March 1843, when his place of residence was given as Sunderland
email to me from Dee Cook, Archivist to the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries, London, 2002-06-28
c. 1843 briefly worked in Egerton, near Bolton J. Dunleavy (2007) 'Dr John Binns, Haslingden’s forgotten reformer', Transactions of the Lancashire and Cheshire Antiquarian Society. Vol. 103
1847

The first Medical Directory was published in 1846 but this only covered London. The 1847 edition includes the first Provincial Listing and John Binns's entry gives his place of residence as Haslingden, Lancs, and describes him as being in "Gen. Pract." His LSA 1843 is also noted. Clearly he neither moved, nor gained any other qualifications nor changed the nature of his medical practice because his entry in the Medical Register of 1873 provides no other details. For the years 1874–76, the Medical Directory has an entry for his name but states "address uncommunicated". He is no longer listed from 1877.

email to me from Dee Cook, Archivist to the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries, London, 2002-06-28
1848-12-06 surgeon, of Haslingden; m. Ellen Hall (cal 1828 – 1913, d. of John Hall, Esq., of Stone House, Clough End, near Haslingden), at Haslingden church, by the Rev. Nathaniel Morgan, incumbent National Probate Calendar; Thistlethwaite CD; David Binns gedcom; PRO HO 107/2250 f? p38; PRO RG14PN25538 RG78PN1461 RD479 SD3 ED14 SN154; Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser, 1848-12-16
Children: John George (1850–1872), Hannah (1852–1929), Margaret (1854–1930), Herbert (1857–1903), Lucy (1867 – after 1891) censuses; National Probate Calendar; Thistlethwaite CD; John Binns and Abigail King Family; email from John Dunleavy, 2010-01-31
  campaigned for street lighting in Haslingden J. Dunleavy (2007)
1851 medical licentiate of apothecaries co. London, of Albert Street, Haslingden, Lancashire, living with family and one house servant HO 107/2250 f122 p33
1856-05-07

THE HASLINGDEN INSTITUTE.—On Wednesday evening, Mr. John Binns, surgeon, delivered an interesting lecture to the members and friends of the Young Men's Institute, on "The History and Constitution of the House of Commons."

Blackburn Standard, 1856-05-14
in the week before 1856-11-19 at a meeting of the friends of the free library at Haslingden, promised to donate £100, his library of valuable and scarce books, and a small museum, to form the nucleus of a larger Blackburn Standard, 1856-11-19
1857 a leading member of the Mechanics Institute, campaigning for a public library in Haslingden. Offered £100 and 400 volumes from his private book collection to the projected library. Published a pamphlet entitled Free Libraries: what about them? Haslingden Institute opened in 1860. J. Dunleavy (2007)
1857-01-10 Preston Guardian: Dr Binns offered £100 towards the cost of a public library in Haslingden, as well as 400 books from his personal library John Binns and Abigail King Family
1857-12-27 elected corresponding and minute secretary to the Haslingden Institute for the forthcoming year Bury Times, 1858-01-02
1858-02-08 gave evidence to the inquest on Richard Gill, who had been found dead in Church-street, and whom he had attended Bury Times, 1858-02-13
1859-04-18 at a Reform meeting at Rawtenstall,

JOHN BINNS, Esq., of Haslingden, was next called upon to address the meeting, and, after some preliminary observations respecting Mr. Bright's proposal for reform, he said that he (Mr. Binns) had never spoken in a strictly political meeting before since he came into this part of the country, and if Lord Derby should hear of it he hoped that he would spare the rod, as this was his first transgression. He claimed as an Englishman the right to give expression to his own opinions. Speaking relative to France, he said that Louis Napoleon had no more right to the throne of France than the poor wounded beggar boy, who, during the revolution, went to the Tuileries and wrapped himself in the imperial purple, and died there.

Bury Times, 1859-04-23
1861 licente of Socy of Apoths London, of Regent St, Haslingden, Lancashire, living with his family RG 9/3060 f123 p31
1862 10th Report of Science and Art Department Return for Haslingden; John Binns secretary; students number 19 taking electricity and magnetism; inorganic and organic chemistry; twelve Queens prizes John Binns and Abigail King Family
1863-01-24 chairman of the Co-operative Shareholders' Central Relief Committee, Lancashire, to which he had donated £20 Bury Times, 1863-01-24
1863-06-13 president of the Haslingden Auxiliary Union and Emancipation Society Bury Times, 1863-06-13
1864 with a local manufacturer, John Blakey Whitehead, he established a weekly journal, the Haslingden and Rawtenstall Express, described as ‘advanced liberal’ in its politics J. Dunleavy (2007)
1864-04-19 the 3rd Conference of the National Reform Association at Free Trade Hall, Manchester was attended by Jno. Binns from Haslingden Liverpool Mercury, 1864-04-20
mid 1860s set up a special fund to give aid during the cotton famine J. Dunleavy (2007)
1866-12-29 gave evidence at the inquest into the death of Maria Whitaker, found drowned Bury Times, 1876-01-05
by 1869-05-01 appointed a county magistrate Lancaster Gazette, 1869-05-01
1869-05-25 sworn at Salford Hundred Intermediate Sessions Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser, 1869-05-26
1870 stepped down as Secretary of the Haslingden Institute J. Dunleavy (2007)
1871 licentiate of apothecar. co. London, of Regent St, Haslingden, Lancashire, living with his family RG 10/4140 f122 p4
1871-03-22 surgeon, of Haslingden; co-executor of the will of John Hall, coal merchant The London Gazette, 1871-04-11
  a Poor Law Guardian J. Dunleavy (2007)
1871/1872 Lancashire Record Office: Woodcock of Haslingden; On the death of John Hall of Clough End, colliery owner, who died possessed of a capital messuage called Higher Hudhey Admittance of John Binns of Haslingden, surgeon, and John Ormerod of Clough End, cotton manufacturer, on trust further to the will of J.H. and of Ann Hall of Haslingden, spinster, to Higher Hud Hey Farm 32 ac. 34 p.) surrendered for £3,100 by John Binns now of Western Hill, Durham, surgeon, and John Ormerod John Binns and Abigail King Family
1872 left Haslingden, with his family. At the farewell function organised just prior to their departure Lawrence Whitaker, a mill owner, prominent Baptist and a Liberal, assured John Binns:

We feel that our town has been honoured and benefited by your residence amongst us. You have not lived in vain, and we cannot but feel proud that the name of John Binns has been connected and associated with all the movements that have and would have tended to benefit our town – to lessen its crime, to increase its sobriety, and all the means which would result in the mental and moral elevation its people.

Reprint from the local papers of the proceedings connected with the presentation to Mr John Binns, of Haslingden, 16 May, 1872 (Durham, 1872), quoted in J. Dunleavy (2007)
1874-03-13 Northern Echo (Darlington): Dr Binns involved in the opening of the “Shakespeare British Workman” in Durham as public house without drink John Binns and Abigail King Family

1875-09-05

There were several articles and cuttings on Dr John Binns in Sunderland library. He died in 1875 and there is a newspaper cutting showing a photo of his portrait. It says he was virtual founder of the Haslingden Institute, pioneer of the Free Library movement of 1857. He left Haslingden in 1872 to go to Durham and died at Western Hill, Durham, 1875-09-05 in his 58th year, interred in St Cuthbert's Church, Durham. His wife moved to Lancaster. She was the daughter of the late Mr John Hall, of Stone House, Haslingden, who was part owner in his life of Baxenden and other collieries. A sketch of John's life was published in the Gazette of 27th February. He also made a farewell speech to Haslingden which was printed. He left a widow, son and 3 daughters.

There is or was a memorial in the form of a drinking fountain in the wall of the Haslingden library placed there by his temperance friends. There was also a death announcement 1875-09-10 p. 8 col. 3 of Durham County Advertiser, where it says he was a JP and resided at Western Hill. He was on the Commission of the Peace for South Lancs. The cause of death was heart disease. It says he practised (most successfully) as a doctor at Haslingden. Acquired Moorsley Banks Paper Mill.  Involved in the British Workman on the North Road etc. etc. The Mayor of Durham, Mr George Gradson, was a pall-bearer.

email to me from Margaret Page, 2002-07-03; John Binns and Abigail King Family
1875-09-05

Haslingden. Death of a Late townsman. We have to report the death of Dr. John Binns, late of Regent Street, Haslingden, which took place at Durham on Sunday. Deceased was in his 58th year. About three years ago he left Haslingden for Durham. He was one of the justices of the peace, and for many years took a deep interest in the Mechanics’ Institute, and in the politics of the Liberal Party. He was much esteemed for his personal worth and professional ability.

Accrington Times, 1875-09-11, quoted in in J. Dunleavy (2007)
1875-09-06 Northern Echo (Darlington): Sudden death of Dr Binns J P of Durham. Short obituary. Moved to Durham about three or four years ago John Binns and Abigail King Family
1875-09-09 Northern Echo: Funeral of Dr Binns, interred at St Cuthberts Churchyard, Durham. Chief mourners were Mr Watson Binns, Mr William Binns, Mr Herbert Binns, Mr E Binns, Mr T Hall, Mr G Ormerod, and Mr W Rawstron
1875-12-04 probate at Durham Registry, £4000, address 5 Weston Hill, Durham, to Ellen Binns, relict
1876-01-21 London Gazette: John Binns, late of Western Hill, Durham, paper manufacturer. Widow Ellen Binns


William Binns08. William Binns

1819-07-24  b. Sunderland, Durham TNA: PRO RG 6/404, /775
1829/1833 at Ackworth School; resident of Sunderland Ackworth School Centenary Committee: List of the Boys and Girls admitted into Ackworth School 1779–1879 (1879) Ackworth
1832 certificate of transfer to Brighouse Brian Davey: Thistlethwaite CD; information from Alf Rogers, citing Frederick’s memoirs
1841 woollen draper apprentice, in household of Josa Blakey, Regent St, Halifax PRO HO 107/1300/7 f12 p16
1842 certificate of transfer from Brighouse Brian Davey: Thistlethwaite CD; information from Alf Rogers, citing Frederick’s memoirs
1842-12-23 London Gazette: Partnership dissolved by mutual consent between Henry Binns and William Binns, in partnership in Sunderland as woollen drapers and merchant tailors, under the firm of H. and W. Binns John Binns and Abigail King Family, accessed 2010-12-20
1842/1843 house, 64 Tatham St, Bishopwearmouth. [Poll Book]
1848-06-09 Wm and Watson Binns distrained for church rates. Demand £1.6.0, charges 4/-; cash from till £1-10-0. Great Book of Sufferings, Vol. 43
1849-07-16 Wm and Watson Binns distrained for church rates. Demand £1.2.0, charges 3/-; cash from till £1-5-0.
1850 woollen draper and tailor at 196 High St. [Ward’s Northumberland and Durham directory] John Binns and Abigail King Family
1850-04-09 partnership dissolved, between William and Watson Binns, woollendrapers of Sunderland Morning Chronicle, 1850-04-10; The London Gazette
1850-04-13 Leader: Partnership dissolved W and W Binns, Sunderland, woollen drapers John Binns and Abigail King Family
1850-10-16 distrained for church rates. Demand 13/3, charges 3/-; cash from drawer, 16/3. Great Book of Sufferings, Vol. 43
1851 clothier employing two men, 55 Tatham St, Bishopwearmouth, living with brother, a house servant, and a lodger HO 107/2396 f282 p17
1851-11-18 clothier, of Sunderland; distrained for church rates. Demand 11/1½, charges 2/-; four pairs cloth trousers, two scarfs & one handkerchief taken, value £1/2/8 Great Book of Sufferings, Vol. 43; Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury, 1852-03-13
1855 draper's assistant at 27 Nile St, Bishopwearmouth. [Ward’s Directory, Newcastle] John Binns and Abigail King Family
1856-11-27 draper; m. Elizabeth Sykes (cal 1830 – after 1866), Sunderland fmh The Friend; National Probate Calendar; Brian Davey: Thistlethwaite CD; John Binns and Abigail King Family; Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury, 1856-11-29
1858 house and shop at 75 High St, Bishopwearmouth. [Register of Electors] John Binns and Abigail King Family
1861 confectioner employing one woman and two girls, of 1 Bridge St, Bishopwearmouth, living with wife, a journeywoman confectioner, and two apprentice confectioners RG 9/3765 f72 p6
1864/1865 abode and shop at 1 Bridge St, Bishopwearmouth. [Register of Electors] John Binns and Abigail King Family
1865-11-10 Newcastle Courant: Child Dropping: Mary Mattimore of Sunderland was observed leaving a water closet at the back of the premises of William Binns, tailor and draper, High Street, apparently suffering from illness. A few minutes later a person heard the low wailing of a child lying at the bottom of the water closet. The woman and child were taken by cab to the workhouse.
1866-03-11 confectioner, of Sunderland; d. at his residence, Bridge Street, Sunderland National Probate Calendar; The Friend VI.64:10; GRO index
1866-03-14 John Cowgill attended his funeral at Sunderland The British Friend XXIV.4:86
1866-04-24 will proved at Durham by widow Elizabeth Binns, sole executrix; effects under £1500 National Probate Calendar
  carte de visite reproduced with permission of the Religious Society of Friends in Britain  


Watson Binns 09. Watson Binns

1820-12-22  b. Sunderland, Durham TNA: PRO RG 6/404, /775
 

We began to take down the shop this morning. We should have got all done today had not William and R. Rowntree detained us all afternoon.

We also had an unexpected increase in stock this morning, of a son which they have named Watson Binns. Aunt got her bed about 5 o'clock this morning.

diary of David Binns, quoted in Margaret Page (2013) 'Watson Binns—missionary to Bewdley', presentation to QFHS Bewdley One Day Meeting, 2013-04-13
1831/1835 at Ackworth School; resident of Sunderland Ackworth School Centenary Committee: List of the Boys and Girls admitted into Ackworth School 1779–1879 (1879) Ackworth
  apprenticed to woollen drapery with David Binns of Halifax. Improver and woollen merchant Ms Memoirs of David Binns; information from Alf Rogers; Ackworth Old Scholars' Association Report No 24, Eighth Month 1905
1837-08-18 removed to Brighouse, Yorkshire; thence to Pontefract, Yorkshire information from Alf Rogers
1841 linen drap. ap., in household of David Binns, linen draper, 5 Corn Market, Halifax, Yorkshire PRO HO 107/1300/11 f25 p5
1841 went to Charles Bennington, of Wakefield, as improver. After this he returned to his native town and commenced business with his brother William. AOSA Report No 24, 1905; Page (2013)
1842/1843 house, 64 Tatham St., Bishopwearmouth. [Poll Book] David Binns gedcom
1843-03-15 removed to Bishopwearmouth information from Alf Rogers
1848-06-09 Wm and Watson Binns distrained for church rates. Demand £1.6.0, charges 4/-; cash from till £1-10-0. Great Book of Sufferings, Vol. 43
1849-07-16 Wm and Watson Binns distrained for church rates. Demand £1.2.0, charges 3/-; cash from till £1-5-0.
1850-04-04

NOTICE is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore subsisting between us the undersigned, William Binns and Watson Binns, at the borough of Sunderland, in the county of Durham, as Woollendrapers and Tailors, under the firm of W. and W. Binns, as been this day dissolved by mutual consent.—Witness our hands this 4th day of April 1850.

William Binns.

Watson Binns.

London Gazette, quote in Page (2013)
1850-04-09 partnership dissolved, between William and Watson Binns, woollendrapers of Sunderland Morning Chronicle, 1850-04-10; The London Gazette
1850 woollen draper and tailor at 196 High St, Bishopwearmouth. [Ward’s Northumberland and Durham] David Binns gedcom
1851 draper employing 1 man, of Tatham St, Bishopwearmouth, living with brother, a house servant, and a lodger HO 107/2396 f282 p17
1853-01-29 enfranchised in Bishopwearmouth, with a share of a freehold house in Carlton St Newcastle Journal, 1853-01-29
1855 woollen draper at 136 High St, Bishopwearmouth, residence 27 Nile St., Bishopwearmouth. [Ward's Directory, Newcastle] David Binns gedcom
1856 abode at Nile St, shop at 136 High St, Bishopwearmouth. [Register of Electors]
1858 house and shop at 135 High St, Bishopwearmouth. [Register of Electors]
1858-06-30 m. Esther Lunt Wood (1833–1911; daughter of Joshua and Martha Wood; of Birkenhead), at Leominster The Friend; Annual Monitor; Brian Davey: Thistlethaite CD
1859-09-11 secretary of the Sunderland Total Abstinence Society Luton Times and Advertiser, 1858-09-11
1859

During these years he was a zealous member of the Society of Friends, taking acceptable vocal part in their meetings at an early age, and he was in 1859 recorded a Minister. He also was an energetic Temperance worker, and for twenty years filled the post of honorary Secretary to the Sunderland Temperance Society.

AOSA Report No 24, 1905
Children: Amy Louisa (1860–1939), Alfred Watson (1861–1916), Esther Theresa (1863–1934) The Friend; The British Friend; Edward H. Milligan (2007) Biographical Dictionary of British Quakers in Commerce and Industry 1775–1920, York: Sessions Book Trust
1861 woollen draper, of 26 Nelson Str., Bishopwearmouth, living with one servant RG 9/3775 f26 p41
1864/1865 abode at 26 Nelson St, shop at 135 High St, Bishopwearmouth. [Register of Electors} David Binns gedcom
1865-07-12 "At Newcastle Monthly Meeting, held at Sunderland, 12th of Seventh Month, Watson Binns, of Sunderland, was recorded a minister." The Friend 1865-10-01, p. 226
1865-09-27 temperance agent, present at the annual conference of the North of England Temperance League, in the Athenæum, Fawcett-street, Sunderland Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury, 1865-09-30
1866-03-15 removed to Warwickshire North Page (2013), citing Warwick, Leicester and Stafford QM records
1867-11-14 of The Laurels, Camp Hill, Birmingham, Warwickshire
1868 of Highgate Place, Moseley Road, removed to Bewdley
1868-09-23 partnership dissolved—Watson Binns and B. Yorke, Charles Henry-st., Birmingham, wire drawers Nottinghamshire Guardian, 1868-10-02; The London Gazette, 1868-09-25
1866/1869

In 1866 Watson Binns removed to Birmingham, where, after three years' business trouble with an unsatisfactory partner, he decided to relinquish the undertaking.

AOSA Report No 24, 1905
1869-11-01 of Bewdley; present at the annual conference of the temperance association, in the Lecture-room of the Kidderminster Temperance Society Worcestershire Chronicle, 1869-11-03
1870-03-10

Watson Binns was liberated by minute of Worcestershire and Shropshire Monthly Meeting, held at Worcester 10th of Third Month, to visit some of the meetings comprised within that Monthly Meeting, and of the Monthly Meetings of Staffordshire and North Warwickshire, and to hold some public meetings in the course of his service as way may open.

The Friend NS X.Apr:93
 

Having an offer from Edward Pease, of Darlington, to undertake mission work for him in Bewdley, Worcestershire—where he had bought an estate—Watson Binns removed there, and he much enjoyed for seventeen years the quiet country life, buy in religious and temperance work amongst the poor of that populous district.

AOSA Report No 24, 1905
 

Watson does not seem to have been successful in business, except as an agent of one sort or another but I think there is no doubt he was a PAID Quaker Minister with money provided by Edward Pease. This enabled the Bewdley Meeting to become a Preparative Meeting, reasonably successful whilst Watson was there but declined quickly afterwards. Of course it was making the Meeting available to the wealthy Birmingham Quakers such as the Sturge family who came to Bewdley for weekends.

information from Margaret Page
1870-03-16 Friends of Temperance meeting held in Wribbenhall. "Mr Binns gave particular amusement by his reading of some of John Ploughman's humorous sketches." Page (2013), citing Kidderminster Shuttle 1870-03-19 and Wribbenhall the Day before Yesterday, by Bewdley Historical Research Group
1870-04 movements The British Friend XXVIII.Apr:88
1870-11 The British Friend XXVIII.Nov:276
1870-11 and 1870-12

The Friend NS X.Nov:278, Dec:304

1871-02 The British Friend XXIX.Feb:36
1871 "commission agent", "manure", of Habberley Road, Wribbenhall, Bewdley, Worcestershire, living with wife, two children, and father-in-law RG 10 3036 f113 p5
1871-12-23 present at meeting at the Guildhall with a view to avoid forming a School Board in the borough; not a ratepayer or burgess of Bewdley, so not allowed to speak.

"The gentleman from the other side of the water 'beyond the bridge' with a Great Interest in the cause of Education"

Page (2013)
1873-01 movements The Friend NS XIII.Jan.20-1
1873-09-21 among Westmorland section of Yearly Meeting’s committee, arrived at Penrith from Kendal The Friend NS XIV.Nov:346
1873-09-22 returned to complete a service in Swarthmore meeting The Friend NS XIV.Nov:348
1874-06-11

Our friend Watson Binns has at this time, women friends being present, laid before us a concern which rests with him to visit in Gospel Love some of the smaller meetings within the adjoining MM of Warwickshire North and South and of Staffordshire & to hold some meetings & the course of such service as may open with those not professing with us in consideration thereof this Meeting feels unity therewith and liberates him for said service he being a Minister in unity in our Society Meeting that he may be enabled by divine assistance to perform that which may be required of him.

minutes of Worcs. & Shropshire Monthly Meeting, cited in Page (2013)
1874-07-01 attended Wallingford Monthly Meeting The Friend NS XV.Aug:224
1874-07-04 attended Reading and Henley meetings
1874-07-05 held meeting in High Wycombe
1874-07-09 appointed rep to Quarterly Meeting

to advise friends to keep clear and careful accounts . . .

to advise Martha Tangye and stepson John that they have been accepted as members

referee to provide visiting ministers with information

minutes of Worcs. & Shropshire Monthly Meeting, cited in Page (2013)
1874-08-04 Western Quarterly Meeting. Visited by members of Committee appointed by Yearly Meeting including Henry Binns and Henry Pease, Thomas Pumphrey, George Palmer, and Isaac Robson.

We therefore desire to stir up the life that is in you that it may be increasingly subservient to the cause of holy religion.

. . . strengthen the things that remain & which in some places appear 'ready to die'.

Page (2013)
1875-01 held meetings for the public in Uttoxeter, Leek, Stafford, &c. The British Friend XXXIII.Feb:36
1875-03-28 appointed clerk; minutes in his handwriting, and signed by him minutes of Bewdley Preparative Meeting, cited in Page (2013)
  usually appointed as representative to the Monthly Meeting
  on committees, some meeting at his house:

First Day School for males and females above 16 years (opened by William White

1875-06-09 of Habberley-road, Bewdley; an agent for the Liberator Permanent Building and Investment Society Worcestershire Chronicle, 1875-06-09
1875-09-09 Northern Echo: Funeral of Dr Binns, interred at St Cuthberts Churchyard, Durham. Chief mourners were Mr Watson Binns, Mr William Binns, Mr Herbert Binns, Mr E Binns, Mr T Hall, Mr G Ormerod, and Mr W Rawstron John Binns and Abigail King Family
1876-05-27 spoke at General School Conference The Friend NS XVI.June:154
1878 Tea Meetings at time of the General Meeting, and after

on committee to examine deeds over Right of Way to the Meeting House skirting Winterdyne; walked the Right of Way with Charles Sturge and Joseph Tangye

on accommodation committee

on committee to appoint a new Clerk (Langley Kitching was appointed); and on committee to appoint Elders and Overseers

minutes of Bewdley Preparative Meeting, cited in Page (2013)
1879-03 had subscribed £1.1.0 to the Ackworth School Centenary Fund The Friend NS XIX.Mar ads 9, The British Friend Mar ads 10
1879-09 of Bewdley Berrow's Worcester Journal, 1879-09-20
1880-08 of Bewdley; left a legacy in the will of Edward Pease Northern Echo, 1880-08-21
1881 home mission agent; of Habberley Road, Kidderminster Foreign, Worcestershire, living with his wife and daughter RG 11/2903 f79 p17
1881-11-18

SOUTHEND HALL, GLOUCESTER.

GOSPEL MEETING

TO-NIGHT! TO-NIGHT!!

ADDRESSES BY

MRS. RICHARDSON AND MR. WATSON BINNS.

Sankey's Hymns and Solos.

Meeting to commence at Half-past Seven.

All are Welcome.

Gloucester Citizen, 1881-11-18
1891 building society and coal agent, of 49 Newton Road, Yardley, Worcestershire, living with his wife, daughter, and nephew RG 12/2463 f124 p59
  after Edward Pease's death Watson Binns went to Ireland to undertake similar religious work AOSA Report No 24, 1905
1891-10-30 present at a meeting of the friends of peace, for the appointment of delegates to the Universal Peace Congress to be held in Rome on 9 November Birmingham Daily Post, 1891-10-31
1892-10 lost all his savings in the collapse of the Liberator Permanent Building Society Page (2013); AOSA Report No 24, 1905
1893-10 had recently visited Friends in Denmark, with wife; primarily social The British Friend II Oct:283–4
about 1894

Again settling in Birmingham he spent eleven years, in business life, but most unfortunately at the age of seventy-four he lost all his savings in the Liberator Building Society. This he bore with cheerful resignation and fortitude.

AOSA Report No 24, 1905
1896-06-24/-25 attended the Ackworth General Meeting Proceedings of the Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, Part XV, Eighth Month, 1896
about 1898

A few years after this he disposed of his property in Birmingham and bought a country cottage on a high undulation of Oxfordshire at the village of Sibford. This property he restored and re-embellished, and planted a beautiful garden, from which was an extensive view, where he peacefully enjoyed the last seven years of his life, full of vital energy for good works and a strength to the Friends' meetings of the district by his long and experienced ministry.

AOSA Report No 24, 1905
1901 living on his own means in Burdrop, Sibford Gower, Oxfordshire, with his wife and daughter RG 13/1402 f37 p12
of Meadow Crest, Sibford, near Banbury Proceedings of the Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, Part XX, Eighth Month, 1901
1902 of Sibford The Friend
1905-03-31 d. at Meadow Crest, Sibford, suddenly, after a few days’ indisposition; in his 85th year, "full of days and honour" National Probate Calendar; The Friend XLV:224, 1905-04-07; The British Friend XIV Apr:116; AOSA Report No 24, 1905; GRO index
 

WATSON BINNS,      84    31  3mo.  1905

Burdrop, Sibford. A Minister.

1906 Annual Monitor
  obit. & photograph in Annual Monitor. [??—possibly should say AOSA Report No 24, 1905]  
 

WATSON BINNS (scholar 1829–34), ninth child of the fifteen born to George and Margaret Binns, of Sunderland, was born in the year 182o.

His parents died within a year of each other when Watson Binns was only fourteen years of age, which circumstance left all the care of the large family on his eldest brother, Henry.

Watson Binns was apprenticed to the woollen drapery business carried on by David Binns, of Halifax, after which, in 1841, he went to Charles Bennington, of Wakefield, as improver. After this he returned to his native town and commenced business with one of his brothers.

In 1858 he married Esther Lunt Wood, daughter of Joshua and Martha Wood, of Birkenhead. During these years he was a zealous member of the Society of Friends, taking acceptable vocal part in their meetings at an early age, and he was in 1859 recorded a Minister. He also was an energetic Temperance worker, and for twenty years filled the post of honorary Secretary to the Sunderland Temperance Society.

In 1866 Watson Binns removed to Birmingham, where, after three years' business trouble with an unsatisfactory partner, he decided to relinquish the undertaking.

Having an offer from Edward Pease, of Darlington, to undertake mission work for him in Bewdley, Worcestershire—where he had bought an estate—Watson Binns removed there, and he much enjoyed for seventeen years the quiet country life, busy in religious and temperance work amongst the poor of that populous district. After Edward Pease's death Watson Binns went to Ireland to undertake similar religious work.

Again settling in Birmingham he spent eleven years in business life, but most unfortunately at the age of seventy-four he lost all his savings in the Liberator Building Society. This he bore with cheerful resignation and fortitude. A few years after this he disposed of his property in Birmingham and bought a country cottage on a high undulation of Oxfordshire at the village of Sibford. This property he restored and re-embellished, and planted a beautiful garden, from which was an extensive view, where he peacefully enjoyed the last seven years of his life, full of vital energy for good works and a strength to the Friends' meetings of the district by his long and experienced ministry.

Full of days and honour he was suddenly called away on the 31st March, 1905, at the age of eighty-four years.

AOSA Report No 24, 1905
1905-05-31 will proved at London by widow Esther Lunt Binns; effects £938 9s. 9d. National Probate Calendar


10. Margaret Binns

1822-04-08 b. Sunderland, Durham TNA: PRO RG 6/404, /775
1833/1836 at Ackworth School; resident of Sunderland Ackworth School Centenary Committee: List of the Boys and Girls admitted into Ackworth School 1779–1879 (1879) Ackworth
1838-01 began at Mount School, York The Mount School, York. List of Teachers and Scholars 1784–1816, 1831–1906 (1906) York: Sessions
1838-12 left Mount School The Mount School, York. List of Teachers and Scholars (1906)
1841 ind., of Murton Place, Bishopwearmouth, living with family, sister, and two female servants PRO HO 107/309/4 f13 p21
1845-08-14 of Murton Street, Bishopwearmouth; m. John Andrews (1820–1859; son of Joseph Andrews and Elizabeth Pallister; store-keeper and ship-owner of Sunderland), at Bishopwearmouth Friends' meeting house The Friend; The British Friend; Annual Monitor; Edward H. Milligan (2007) Biographical Dictionary of British Quakers in Commerce and Industry 1775–1920, York: Sessions Book Trust; information from Alf Rogers;
  "How my sister Margaret came to fancy a man like John Andrews I don’t know—for she was a tall lady-like & handsome looking woman. John took after his father—one of the go & easy sort." Reminiscences of Frederick Binns
 

She is remembered as a handsome woman much admired for her gracious bearing and stately carriage. She dressed well, and in the austere Quaker years between 1840 and 1850 was regarded as somewhat gay and fashionable.

Isaac Henry Wallis (1924) Frederick Andrews of Ackworth. London: Longmans, Green & Co., p. 13
1846 of Frederick Street, Bishopwearmouth Brian Davey: Thistlethwaite CD
Children: John Edward (1846–1935), Charles (1848–1933), Frederick (1850–1922) Bootham School Register; Milligan (2007); Davey: Thistlethwaite CD
1850-01-22 of Frederick Street, Sunderland Wallis (1924), p. 13
 

The Binns family was consumptive, and it was after nursing an elder sister that Margaret developed symptoms of the disease, early in 1850. From that time she was never well, and she suffered much during the eighteen months that intervened before her death. John Andrews wrote for his children a short memoir of their mother, and from this we learn how happy were their six years of married life. She was not only a cheerful companion, but a capable wife and mother. "She felt the responsibility that rested upon a parent, and tried to do her utmost." During the last year of her life her husband was taken suddenly ill. "It put," he writes, "new vigour into my dear wife, and well she nursed me considering her weak state." There is a pitiful account in the "Annual Monitor" [ . . . ] which is confirmed by John Andrews, who implores his children to so live that they may have no regrets when the end draws near. To me this is very pathetic. It is sad to think of the young mother’s latter days being clouded by remorse for the natural gaiety of youth and love of bright colours, for her neglect to use the language of Friends—the thee and thou—and even for the wearing of her wedding ring. These thoughts led the gentle spirit into "the depths and vales" of the Borderland, but happily she also knew its heights and then her heart overflowed with love to the whole family of man and she longed "that all might come, taste and see how good the Lord is."

She thought much about her little children, her eldest only four, the youngest a one-year-old baby. "It seems very remarkable," she said, "whilst thinking yesterday morning of my poor children, what would become of them, a voice, which almost startled me, said, ‘Leave them to me,’ and I have not felt anxious since."

It is good to know from her husband that "the last few weeks of her life were seasons of rest to her previously troubled mind. She felt her Saviour near and her sins forgiven." She wished her boys to be brought up as Friends and, in bidding farewell, she assured him the Lord would care for him and the dear little children. "Think of me," she said, "it is not much we can do for one another, but do not forget me."

 
Wallis (1924), pp. 13–14
1851 of 24 Frederick Street, Bishopwearmouth, living with her family, a cook, and a nurse maid, her sister Sophia visiting HO 107/2396 f35 p32
1851-09-30 d. Bishopwearmouth, from tuberculosis Annual Monitor; Wallis (1924), pp. 13–14
 

"John Edward Andrews, in a recent letter, writes: "My mother I do not recollect at all, but I will say that in America when things did not look too good with me, I could feel she was near me.""

Wallis (1924), p. 14


Frederick Binns11. Frederick Binns (Fred)

1825-03-08 b. 176 High Street, Sunderland, Durham TNA: PRO RG 6/404, /775
  bottle-fed by his mother, whom he loved much better than his father Reminiscences of Frederick Binns
  remembered being shut up in a very large drawer at the back of the shop, used for keeping carpets in, by way of punishment (for an unknown offence)
1834/1839 at Ackworth School; resident of Sunderland Ackworth School Centenary Committee: List of the Boys and Girls admitted into Ackworth School 1779–1879 (1879) Ackworth
  "I was sent to Ackworth School when I was between 9 & 10 & never saw my father & mother after that." Reminiscences of Frederick Binns
1838 "Gone were the days [ . . . ] when, like Frederick Binns of Sunderland, who travelled to school by mail coach in 1838, a child could leave home at a tender age and never see either of its parents again". Elfrida Vipont (1959) Ackworth School from its foundation in 1779 to the introduction of co-education in 1946. London
  "I was born shy—like Joe Chamberlain & without any push or energy—to carry me thro’ the ups & downs of this busy world." Reminiscences of Frederick Binns
  apprenticed to Edward Bromley, grocer of Barnsley, indenture cancelled by brother Henry following death of their father Reminiscences of Frederick Binns; John Binns and Abigail King Family, accessed 2010-12-20
1839 to Pontefract information from Alf Rogers
1841 grocer ap., in household of Edwd Bromley, Cheap Side, Barnsley PRO HO 107/1325/4 f19 p30
1846-01-13 removed from Friends at Scarborough while shopman with H. Hopkins John Binns and Abigail King Family
1847 from Pickering information from Alf Rogers
1850 to Mansfield
1851 grocer's assistant, of Church Street, Mansfield, Nottinghamshire; household of George Pickard, grocer PRO HO 107/2124 f105 p28
1851 from Mansfield information from Alf Rogers
c. 1852 m. Lucy Ann Stephenson (1832–1909, daughter of James Stephenson and Sarah MacKay/Mackie), Scotland GRO index; David Binns gedcom
1853-04-13 disowned, Mansfield, for marrying out Reminiscences of Frederick Binns; information from Alf Rogers
Children: Sarah Maria (1853–1903), Lucy Sophia (1855–1925), Clara (1857–1941), Margaret Watson (1858–1936), Frederick (1860–1941), Ellen (1864–1864), James Stephenson (1864–1864), Emma (1868–1933), George Watson (1871–1944) The Friend; censuses; Thistlethwaite CD; David Binns gedcom; GRO index; FreeBMD
  Says he had jobs in Barnsley, South Shields, North Shields, Sunderland, Scarborough, York, Mansfield, Chesterfield, Belfast, and Leicester Reminiscences of Frederick Binns; John Binns and Abigail King Family
1854-08-08 London Gazette: Partnership dissolved by mutual consent between Frederic Binns and Edward Binns, trading as F. and E. Binns, High Street, Sunderland, grocers and tea dealers John Binns and Abigail King Family
1856 Directory of Durham: Frederick Binns, grocer, 18 High Street, Sunderland
1861 grocer employing 1 boy, of Grocers shop, 19 Charles St, Monkwearmouth Shore, Durham, living with family and a general servant RG 9/3782 f119 p44
1861 removed to London Sibford Old Scholars' Association, Annual Report 1925
1863-05-08 London Gazette: Partnership dissolved by mutual consent between William Huckvale and Frederic Binns, trading as Huckvale and Binns, coffee roasters of 12 Anchor Yard, Old Street John Binns and Abigail King Family
1871 warehouseman in tea warehouse, living with family at 52 Camden Cottages, Bethnal Green, London RG 10/491 f40 p74
  Moved to London to go into the tea colouring business with R.A.W. [presumably brother-in-law Robert Andrew Wilson]. The Govt put a stop to it by passing the Adulteration Bill. Then tried coffee roasting in partnership with one Huckvale, who was the salesman. One day Huckvale did not return and they discovered he had decamped with the profit on 5 tons of chicory bought with the firm's money. John Binns and Abigail King Family
  Then worked at Idol Lane for Hughes Bros, and later for Ashby's for about twenty years. When RAW left Ashby's he started for himself in Gt Tower St.
1881 warehouseman (tea warehouse), living with his family at 451 Bethnal Green Road, Bethnal Green, London, sharing the house with a widow and her son RG 11/423 f65 p5
1891 tea warehouseman, living with wife and daughter at 31 Green Street, Bethnal Green, London RG 10/270 f39 p9
1901 retired grocer, living with wife at 153 Chelmsford, Walthamstow, Essex RG 13/1624 f181 p40
1909 wrote his Reminiscences John Binns and Abigail King Family
1910 of 187 6th Avenue, Manor Park, E. Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, Annual Report 29
1911 retired grocer, living with son, daughter and 2 grandchildren at 18 School Rd, Manor Park, West Ham, Essex RG14PN9589 RG78PN510B RD188 SD6 ED33 SN280
1911-08-12 d. at 18 School Road, 6th Avenue, Manor Park, London in his 87th year The Friend LI:568, 1911-08-25; GRO index


12. Sarah Binns (Sally)

1826-07-08 b. the old house, High Street, Sunderland, Durham TNA: PRO RG 6/404, /775; Frederick Binns's Reminiscences
1837/1840 at Ackworth School; resident of Sunderland Ackworth School Centenary Committee: List of the Boys and Girls admitted into Ackworth School 1779–1879 (1879) Ackworth
1841 of Villiers St, Bishopwearmouth, living with her sister's family and two female servants PRO HO 107/309/4 f13 p21
1841-08 began at Mount School, York The Mount School, York. List of Teachers and Scholars 1784–1816, 1831–1906 (1906) York: Sessions
1842-06 left Mount School
1841/1842 of Sunderland
1845 to Norwich information from Alf Rogers
1848 from Norwich
1851 draper's daughter, of 30 Byrom St, Liverpool, living with her cousin James Leicester, his wife, and a servant PRO HO 107/2185 f113 p4
1852-10-27 m. Robert Andrew Wilson (1827–1877, son of Robert and Sarah [Bowron] Wilson ; wholesale tea dealer of Newcastle), at Bishopwearmouth National Probate Calendar; The Friend; The British Friend; digest of Durham Quaker births: index
Children: Jessie (1853 – after 1932), Emily (cal 1856 – after 1892), Louisa (cal 1857–1871), Sophia Binns (1859–1926), Eliza Bowron (1861–1941), Ernest (1864–1871), Florence Evelyn (1862–1936), Annie Wilson (1865–1955), Harold (1866–1935) GRO index; National Probate Calendar; The Friend; Annual Monitor; censuses; Hall, Kathleen and Chris Hall, eds (2001) Sidcot School. Register of Old Scholars 1808–1998, Sidcot Old Scholars' Association; Joseph Spence Hodgson (1895) Superintendents, teachers, and principal officers of Ackworth School, from 1779 to 1894, AOSA; source misplaced; H. Winifred Sturge, ed. (n.d. [1932]) A Register of Old Scholars of The Mount School, York 1931–1932. Leominster: The Orphans Printing Press; electoral register; Trove
1861 of 6 Bridge Road, Croydon, living with her family, a head nurse, a cook, and two nurses RG 9/450 f31 p4
1866-05-09 of Sunderland; acknowledged a minister, by Newcastle MM The British Friend XXIV.10:249
1871 of London Road, Reigate Old Boro, Surrey, living with family and two servants RG 10/832 f73 p35
1877-02-06 of Springfield Villa, London-road, Reigate, Surrey; sole executrix of husband's will National Probate Calendar
1881 of London Road, Reigate Foreign, Surrey RG 11/797 f69 p4
1891 living on own means, with two daughters, at 47 Alexandra Road, Croydon RG 12/593 f16 p27
1894-01-28 of 40 Alexandra-road, Croydon; d. at Croydon National Probate Calendar; The British Friend III Apr:102–4
1894-02-27 will proved at London by William Robinson; effects £1374 1s. 3d. National Probate Calendar


13. Edward Binns

1827-11-23 b. in a house at the corner of Durham St and Coronation St, Bishopwearmouth, Durham TNA: PRO RG 6/775; Reminiscences of Frederick Binns
1838/1841 at Ackworth School; resident of Sunderland Ackworth School Centenary Committee: List of the Boys and Girls admitted into Ackworth School 1779–1879 (1879) Ackworth
1841 pupil in the school, of The Friends' School, Ackworth, Yorkshire PRO HO 107/1309/1 f52 p3
1842 certificate to York MM information from Alf Rogers
  of Lawrence Street, Bishopwearmouth
  ship’s chandler in Sunderland
1851 not found in census  
1853-12-08 m. Margaret Eleanor Just (cal 1836 – 1906, daughter of Walter or James Just), at St Michael & All Saints, Bishopwearmouth GRO index; Ackworth Old Scholars' Association Annual Report 1903; Brian Davey: Thistlethwaite CD; David Binns gedcom
  disowned by Friends. Margaret Whatmough (his granddaughter) says he was ‘silenced out’ of the Friends soon after he married Margaret Just (‘and there may have been other misdemeanours as well!!’). information from Alf Rogers
Children: Annie Sophia (1853–1919), George Welch (1854–1930), Lilian (1858–1892), Margaret Eleanor (1862–1927), Florence Eveline (1864–1867), Edward (1866–1951), (Samuel) Evelyn (1868–1877), Violet Miriam (1870–1948), Alfred Henry (1872–1960), Walter (1873–1952), Eva Just (1876–1920), Elsie (1879–1980) The Friend; The British Friend; GRO index; National Probate Calendar; Brian Davey: Thistlethwaite CD; David Binns gedcom; censuses; Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, Annual Reports 1903 & 1930
1854-08-08 London Gazette: Partnership dissolved by mutual consent between Frederic Binns and Edward Binns, trading as F. and E. Binns, High Street, Sunderland, grocers and tea dealers John Binns and Abigail King Family, accessed 2010-12-19
1855 grocer at 18 High St., residence at 18 North Durham St., Bishopwearmouth. [Ward’s Directory of Newcastle]
1856 Directory of Durham: Edward Binns, grocer, 176 High Street, Sunderland
1861 master grocer, living at 176 High Street, Sunderland, with his family and a general servant RG 9/3780 f75 p4
1865/1870 registered elector, abode at 10 Murton St John Binns and Abigail King Family
1871 grocer and confectioner employing 8 persons, living with his family and a general servant at 128 High St, Bishopwearmouth RG 10/4996 f36 p5
1876–7 at 128 High St. [Burgess Roll for Bridge Ward, Bishopwearmouth] John Binns and Abigail King Family
by 1879-11-01 donated 5s. to the Sunderland Relief Fund Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1879-11-01
1881 confectioner and grocer, living with family and two servants at 128 High Street, Bishopwearmouth RG 11/4986 f46 p31
by 1883-10-22 donated 2s. 6d. to the Sunderland and Durham County Institute for the Blind Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1883-10-22
1884-01-07

WANTED, a YOUTH who has been two or three years in the Grocery Trade.—Apply to Edward Binns, Sunderland.

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1884-01-07
1884-03-03

WANTED, a steady PORTER, used to the Grocery trade.—Apply to Edward Binns, 128, High-street.

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1884-03-03
1884-10-21

UNRIVALLED IN THE NORTH OF ENGLAND.

EDWARD BINNS'

CELEBRATED GINGERBREAD

NUTS.

Splendidly flavoured.

Priced 8d, 10d, and 1s per lb.

Call and try a pound sample.

Note the address—

128, HIGH-STREET WEST

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1884-10-21
1886-11-09

EDWARD BINNS'

PURE HOME-MADE SAUSAGE

Is acknowledged by all who have tried it to be the finest they have ever tasted.

ADDRESS—128, HIGH-STREET WEST.

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1886-11-09
1886-12-04

LADIES SHOULD GO TO

EDWARD BINNS

FOR CHRISTMAS CAKES

of the finest Quality.

Try our NEW FLORENCE CAKES and

GERMAN APPLE TARTS,

Also Cocoa-Nut, Sultana, Sponge, German, Rice, Seed, Fruit, and other Cakes.

PURE HOME-MADE SAUSAGE.

Large Stock of Fancy Goods, &c.

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1886-12-04
1887-02-03

FRESH EGGS! FRESH EGGS!!

EDWARD BINNS

Has a regular supply of FRESH EGGS AND COUNTRY BUTTER twice weekly.

Orders promptly attended to.

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1887-02-03
1887-03-12

TRY

EDWARD BINNS'

CELEBRATED

SIMNEL CAKES

Most Delicious.

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1887-03-12
1887-11-23

NOTICE.

THE GROCERY BUSINESS carried on by EDWARD BINNS, at 128, HIGH-STREET WEST, will NOT be continued after Monday, Nov. 21st.

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1887-11-23
1887-12-16

HAVE YOU TRIED

EDWARD BINNS'S

DELICIOUS

HOME MADE SAUSAGE?

ADDRESS—OPPOSITE BACKHOUSE'S BANK

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1887-12-16
1888-02-08

EDWARD BINNS, CONFECTIONER, Purvey of Public Teas, &c., has always a large variety of choice Cakes and Confectionery. Celebrated for Wedding Cakes. Try our celebrated Gingerbread Nuts. Home made Sausage, &c.

ADDRESS: 128, HIGH-STREET WEST.

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1888-02-08
1888-03-20

TRY THE DELICIOUS

SIMNEL OR LENT CAKES.

MADE BY

EDWARD BINNS, CONFECTIONER,

128, HIGH-STREET WEST.

Post Cards promptly attended to.

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1888-03-20
1888-07-16

FOR

RICH WEDDING CAKES

Of the Finest Quality try

EDWARD BINNS, CONFECTIONER,

128, HIGH-STREET WEST.

Can be packed and sent to any part of the Country.

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1888-07-16
1890-03-05

FOUND.—If the lady who LOST HER PURSE in Edward Binns's Shop on Monday calls, it will be returned.

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1890-03-05
1890-05-15

EDWARD BINNS,

CONFECTIONER,

128, HIGH STREET WEST,

AGENT FOR ROBINSON & WORDSWORTH'S CELEBRATED

POMFRET CAKES.

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1890-05-15
1890-06-30

At the wedding breakfast of George Clark and Mabel Thompson:

The wedding cake was supplied by Mr Edward Binns, High-street West, and was quite a work of art, being in three tiers.

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1890-06-03
1890-10-08

SUNDERLAND FAIR COMMEMORATION.

TRY EDWARD BINNS' CELEBRATED ORIGINAL

GINGERBREAD NUTS

At 8d and 1s per pound,

As made by him over 30 years.

ADDRESS: 128, HIGH-STREET WEST.

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1890-10-08
1890-12-02

EDWARD BINNS'S

PURE

HOME MADE SAUSAGE

is a Delicacy for the Breakfast Table.

Epicures should try the TOMATO SAUSAGE.

ADDRESS—128, HIGH-STREET WEST.

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1890-12-02
1891 confectioner, employer, of 128 High Street, Bishopwearmouth, Sunderland, Durham, living with wife, five children, and one servant RG 12/4126 f40 p31
1891-09-11

THE WEDDING DAY.—High-Class Wedding Cakes, beautifully ornamented, from 10s to £20 each. Special ornamented Wedding Cakes for decorating with natural flowers. Every cake guaranteed. Edward Binns, Confectioner, 128, High-street West. The largest maker in the North. Telephone No. 477.—(Advt)

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1891-09-11
1891-09-22

WANTED, a respectable YOUTH as light porter.—Apply to Edward Binns the Confectioner.

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1891-09-22
1892-02-12

For Wedding Breakfasts, Dinners, Receptions, Public Teas, Social Gatherings, &c. try

EDWARD BINNS

REFRESHMENT CONTRACTOR,

128, HIGH-STREET WEST.

TELEPHONE NO. 477.

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1892-02-12
1892-03-23

THE CELEBRATED

SIMNEL CAKES

Were first introduced into this district by

EDWARD BINNS,

CONFECTIONER, 128, HIGH-STREET WEST.

A large number are sold for presents during Lent.

A grand assortment of Easter Eggs will be shown shortly.

TELEPHONE NO. 477

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1892-03-23
1893-08-14

EVERYONE SHOULD TRY

EDWARD BINNS' CELEBRATED

"SUNDERLAND"

Gingerbread Nuts.

Sunderland Daily Post says:—"We have tried the Gingerbread Nuts, and can faithfully say we never tasted a more deliciously flavoured sample."

North-Eastern Daily Gazette, 1893-08-14
1893-12-11

CHRISTMAS CAKES.

No table is complete at this season without one of our beautifully Ornamented and Almond-Iced Christmas Cakes, most suitable for presentation, prices 5s, 7s 6d, 10s, and upwards. Christmas Fruit Cakes, 6d, 8d, and 1s per lb. Mince Pies. Mincemeat, our own make, in 4lb. jars, 10d per lb. Veal and Ham and Game Pies Daily. Public Teas, Evening Parties, Soirees, &c., Catered for in style.

EDWARD BINNS, CONFECTIONER,

128, HIGH-STREET WEST.

TELEPHONE 477. ESTABLISHED OVER 35 YEARS.

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1893-12-11
1896-06-05 London Gazette: The business of confectioner carried on in Sunderland by Edward Binns is transferred to Edward Binns the younger and Alfred Henry Binns and will be carried on by them as sole partners under the style of Edward Binns John Binns and Abigail King Family
1901 retired confectioner, of 4 East Summerhill, Sunderland, Durham, living with wife, three daughters, and general servant RG 13/4705 f173 p26
1902-07-08 gentleman, of 4 Summerhill-east, Sunderland; d. there The British Friend XI Aug:228; GRO index; Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1902-07-09; National Probate Calendar
1902-07-09

We regret to announce the death of Mr Edward Binns at his residence, No. 4 Summerhill East, yesterday. Mr Binns, who was 74, was a son of Mr George Binns, a draper who commenced business in High Street East something like a hundred years ago. Fifty-one years ago Mr Edward Binns began business as a grocer in High Street East, and later removed further up the street. In 1896 he retired, on the business being transferred to the present premises in Fawcett Street. All his spare time was devoted to Christian work among the poor, and for 40 years he was a regular visitor to the Infirmary, the Workhouse (teaching the Workhouse children), and the Monkwearmouth Hospital. Mr Binns was also a regular visitor to the Barracks and the ships in the docks, and had been looked up to as a friend by the poor in the East End of the town. He was an active member of the Bethesda Free Church for over 40 years. He leaves a widow and a grown-up family of nine, one of the daughters being a missionary in India. The internment will take place at Bishopwearmouth Cemetery on Friday, at 1.45 p.m..

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1902-07-09
 

EDWARD BINNS (Scholar 1838–41), son of George and Margaret Binns, of Sunderland, was born 23rd November, 1828. On leaving Ackworth he was apprenticed to Thomas Smith, of Thirsk, and after his time was out he commenced business as a grocer in Sunderland. Shortly after, he married Margaret E. Just (not a Friend), daughter of Walter Just, by whom he had a family of twelve children, half of them being sent to Ackworth. He seems to have lost his membership in the Society of Friends prior to his marriage. Being a great reader and deep thinker, he had his times of doubt in seeking after truth, and he was perhaps judged unwisely and unsympathetically in that strict disciplinary time. Forty years ago he became a member of the Church meeting in Bethesda Free Chapel, under the able ministry of Arthur Augustus Rees, who had renounced being a clergyman of the Church of England.

Humility was the most noticeable trait in Edward Binns' character. He sought to lead a loving, untiring service among the lowly and the poor. For forty years he devoted his life to mission work. The sailors of the seaport, the soldiers in the barracks, received his weekly visitations, the children in the workhouse were taught by him, the patients in the hospitals were tenderly ministered unto. His love for young people inaugurated several children's missions. Foreign mission work enlisted his every sympathy, and great was his joy when his fourth daughter, Violet Miriam (Scholar 1882–6), left home five years ago for India, where she is still engaged among the famine stricken orphans in the villages. Not only did he seek to minister in his unassuming way, but he was powerful in influencing others to give themselves to a life of devoted service. He died the 8th July, 1902, in his seventy-fifth year.

AOSA Annual Report 1903
  bur. Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Sunderland Find a Grave
1902-07-13, 10:30 Pastor F.E. Marsh, of Bethesda Free Chapel, Tatham Street, spoke on "Apelles, approved in Christ."—A memorial address on the late Edward Binns. Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1902-07-12
1902-08-05 will proved at Durham by Margaret Eleanor Binns, widow; effects £1210 National Probate Calendar


14. Sophia Binns

1828-11-13 b. John Andrews's house, Frederick Street, Bishopwearmouth, Durham TNA: PRO RG 6/404, /775; Annual Monitor
1838/1843 at Ackworth School; resident of Sunderland Ackworth School Centenary Committee: List of the Boys and Girls admitted into Ackworth School 1779–1879 (1879) Ackworth
1841 pupil in the school, of The Friends' School, Ackworth, Yorkshire PRO HO 107/1309/1 f56 p9
1851 late governess, visiting with her sister's family at 26 Frederick St, Bishopwearmouth HO 107/2396 f352 p32
1855-05-23 d. Sunderland Annual Monitor; The Friend


Lucy (Binns) Pollard 15. Lucy Binns


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