Children of Joseph John and Mary Sophia Sparkes

Malcolm Sparkes01. Malcolm Sparkes

1881-10-14

 "At 24, William Street, Rochdale, Mary Sophia, wife of Joseph John Sparkes, a son."

The Friend XXI Nov:309; The British Friend XXXIX Nov:291
1891 scholar, living with family at 36 William St, Castleton, Rochdale, Lancashire, with a domestic servant and a nurse TNA: PRO RG 12/3331 f108 p25
1893/1896 of Reading; at Ackworth School Edgar Baron Collinson (1931) List of the Boys and Girls Admitted into Ackworth School from . . . 1879 to the end of 1930. Ackworth
1897-01/1897 at Bootham School Bootham School admission register; Bootham School Register
1898-06 of Ackworth and Bootham Schools; U. London Matric, First Division The Friend XXXVIII:492, 1898-07-29; The British Friend VII Aug:227; Bootham School Register
1901 draughtsman (woodwork), worker, with his brother, boarder with Septimus Martin, commercial traveller, of 35 Exeter Rd, Willesden, Middlesex PRO RG 13/1224 f123 p2
1903/1904 joint Hon. Sec. of the London branch of the Ackworth Old Scholars' Association AOSA Annual Reports 22 and 23, 1903 and 1904
1904 of Wembley; with brothers, gave Frank and Mary Pollard a salad bowl, for their wedding present Mary S.W. Pollard, list of wedding presents
1905-12-22 of Wembley, Middlesex The Friend: 850
1908-04-17 elected as AOSA Secretary AOSA Annual Report 27, 1908
1909 living with his mother in two rooms, ground and first floors (joint), furnished, at The Hawthorns, Alperton-park, Wembley electoral register
1910-03 has issued his first annual Proceedings of the Ackworth Old Scholars’ Association (the 28th report) The British Friend XIX:83
1909/1910 of The Hawthorns, Wembley; AOSA Secretary, assisted by his brother Eric AOSA Annual Report 28, 1909
1910-07-28 "At the Friends’ Meeting-house, Kendal, Malcolm, eldest son of the late Joseph John Sparkes, of Rochdale and Reading, and of Mary Sophia Sparkes, of Wembley, to Elizabeth (Leila), younger daughter of the late John Jackson of Garstang, and of Hannah Maria Jackson, of Kendal." The Friend NS I:530, 1910-08-05; The British Friend XIX Aug:230; Ackworth Old Scholars' Association Annual Report 29, 1910-11
  bride Elizabeth H. Jackson (1882–1969, b. Calder Vale, Lancashire, of Gerrards Cross at date of marriage) censuses; The Friend
1910-08-12 of Bootham and Merton College. Univ. of Oxford, Honours School of Literae Humaniores The Friend I:544
1910-12-18 wrote letter to The Friend on ‘Devonshire House’—re demolition and reconstruction; of Long Gable, South Park, Gerrards Cross The Friend I:867
1910/1912 of Long Gables, South Park, Gerrards Cross; Secretary of AOSA AOSA Annual Reports
1910/1913 of Long Gable, South Park, Gerrards Cross, Buckinghamshire The Friend
1911 manufacturer of joiner[y], employer, living with his wife and a general servant at Long Gable, South Park, Gerrards Cross; 7 rooms RG14PN7863 RG78PN392 RD144 SD2 ED14 SN338
of Long Gable, South park, Gerrard's Cross Kelly's Directory
  had been Clerk of Jordans PM and Clerk of Jordans MM Edgar B. Collinson, ed. (1935) Bootham School Register
191x with his wife, published Penn and Jordans: being a short account of the meeting house called Jordans, with brief biographical notices of some of the early Friends connected therewith, especially of William Penn, who oftentimes worshipped there British Library catalogue
Children: Barbara Jackson (1913–1993), Margaret Jackson (1915–2007), Roger Jackson (1922–2003), John Jackson (1924–2005) Bootham School Register; The Friend; The British Friend; GRO index; Find a Will
1913-01-06 asked a question at meeting of his constituents with Sir Alfred Cripps MP, at the Schoolroom, Gerrards Cross West Middlesex Gazette, 1913-01-17
1914-08-23 Chalfont St Giles: "ADULT SCHOOL.—On Sunday morning, in the first half-hour, Mr. Malcolm Sparkes gave a lecture on "The War after After."" Bucks Herald, 1914-08-29
1915 of Long Gable, South park, Gerrard's Cross Kelly's Directory
   
1915/1921 Ex-Secretary; executive committee member, AOSA AOSA Annual Reports 34/40, 1915/1921
1916 of 30 Dean's Yard, Westminster, London SW The Friend
  manufacturer of architectural joinery, of Gerrards Cross, Buckinghamshire Bootham School Register
  maker of architectural woodwork; social reformer source misplaced
1916 published National Industrial Parliaments: An Attempt to Suggest the First Step Towards a New Industrial Order Founded Upon the Principles of the Kingdom of God Google Books
  on Peace Committee of Society of Friends; made plans for "causing peace" in industry Collinson, ed. (1935)
1916 put forward his plan for 'Constructive Councils' in the building industry; drafted further memorandum for Mr Whitley, embodied later in the Whitley Report and Whitley Councils established in industry
1916-03-03 a conscientious objector

"We have read with deep sympathy—and for my part wholehearted unity—Malcolm's statements to the Court Martial & the magistrates: & our thoughts have been & will be very often with him in his days of separation & punishment, & with Leila, & all nearest to him."

Frank Pollard, budget letter
1916-12 lent £50 by Frank and Mary Pollard Mary S.W. Pollard accounts
1917 published A Memorandum on Industrial Self-Government; with a draft scheme for a Builders' National Industrial Parliament Chamberlin
  developed Whitley Councils DQB
1917-06-20

SCHEME FOR A TRADE PARLIAMENT.

Conference of Trade Unions Approves.

TO AVERT DISPUTES.

An important step in the direction of improving the relations between employers and employed, and of averting disputes, has been taken by the building trade. This industry, in which 800,000 men were employed before the war—about half of this number are now in the fighting forces or are engaged in munition works—has adopted the Parliament of Labour scheme formulated by Mr. Malcolm Sparkes, a member of the Society of Friends and conscientious objector, who is now in Wandsworth prison.

The National Federation of the Building Trade Employers of Great Britain and Ireland some time ago received a deputation from the National Associated Building Trades Council, and as a result of the discussion it was resolved to hold a joint conference, which took place at Pen Corner House, Kingsway, yesterday.

[ . . . ]

AN INQUIRY DEMANDED

After the conference the operatives' representatives discussed the case of Mr. Malcolm Sparkes, and the following resolution was passed: "That the National Associated Building Trades Council learns with regret that Mr. Malcolm Sparkes, a member of the Society of Friends, has been sentenced to imprisonment for conscientious objection whilst engaged on valuable national reconstruction work, and requests that his case be inquired into by the Government with a view to his release, and that in the meantime facilities be afforded to him so that he can continue his work in connection with the industrial parliament scheme.

 


MR. SPARKES'S CASE.

THE GOVERNMENT ADMIT A VERY WRONG DECISION.

The facts with regard to Mr. Malcolm Sparkes were stated by Mr. T.E. Harvey, M.P., in the House of Commons in the course of a debate in which Mr. Hayes Fisher, replying for the Government, admitted that the local tribunal which refused to recognise Mr. Sparkes' industrial reconstruction work as of national importance had given "a very wrong decision."

Mr. Sparkes, before the war, was managing director in a firm making woodwork for the building trade. In the course of 1915 the firm (in which he had not a controlling interest) accepted contracts from the Ministry of Munitions. Mr Sparkes thereupon resigned his position as managing director and arranged to be employed on purely civilian work, taking no profit from the munition contracts.

When the Military Service Act became law he was given 28 days by the Slough Tribunal to find some work of national importance approved by the Pelham Committee. That committee approved of his engaging in industrial reconstruction work in connection with the Garton Foundation. But the Slough Tribunal refused to accept this and sent Mr. Sparkes into the non-combatant corps.

He is now serving the second of his two sentences of 23 months hard labour for refusing to obey military orders.

Evening Despatch, 1917-06-21; similar coverage in the Birmingham Gazette of the same date
1917-11-17 'Labour and Peace'—½-page letter—published in the Daily Herald Daily Herald
1917/1919 imprisoned as a conscientious objector—23 months hard labour, Wormwood Scrubs and Wandsworth prisons The Friend; Dictionary of Quaker Biography
1918-04-30

Lord Parmoor: "Let me give three illustrations only of who these people are who are suffering in this way. I will take three notorious cases. One is that of Mr. Malcolm Sparkes, who is really the author of the much praised Whitley Report. He is a writer and investigator of great eminence, and even while in prison has been consulted by the Government in reference to this Report. What is his position? He has already suffered sixteen months of solitary confinement in prison. We are not so rich in men of that kind that we can afford to waste them in such a manner, apart from the torture which it is to men of that intellectual eminence to be in prison under existing conditions."

Hansard, HL Deb 30 April 1918 vol 29 c894
1918-07

MALCOLM SPARKES (1897-98) is still in gaol. He received a visit from his wife on June 1st. The Editor was extremely interested in meeting one of the policemen (a man with several brothers in the Army) who had been present at his Tribunal. He spoke in terms of the most cordial admiration of M.S.

Bootham 9.1:57
1919-04

MALCOLM J. SPARKES (1897-98) has at last been let out of gaol, unconditionally. His services have been long very badly needed, and even while he was in prison he had frequently to be consulted about matters relating to the building trade.

Bootham 9.3:181
1919-08-22 referred to in an article by G.D.H. Cole, as the "first inspirer" of the Building Trades Parliament Daily Herald
1919/1920 of Long Gable, South Park, Gerrards Cross The Friend
1920-02 paper on the Industrial Council for the Building Industry published in the English Review "February Reviews." Times [London, England] 2 Feb. 1920: 16. The Times Digital Archive. Web. 20 May 2015
  pub.—The Industrial Council for the Building Industry; Modern Industry—Christian Line of Development Collinson, ed. (1935)
1920-03-10

Personality Behind the Building Guilds Movement.

The Guild movement behind the National Building Trades Federation, which is receiving astonishing support for the idea that schemes for the erection of workmen's dwellings organised by municipalities and local effort should be controlled and managed by direct labour, supplied through District Committees, has for its governing genius Mr Malcolm Sparkes, a builder in a small way of business at Willesden, London.

Little is known even to-day of one of the most remarkable personalities in the Labour movement. For six weeks prior to the outbreak of war the London building trades were in the throes of a great strike. Mr Sparkes was then a member of the Employers' Federation, and when that body decided to enforce a national lockout "young Sparkes," as he was known familiarly among his friends, resigned, thinking that some better way could be devised to stop a disastrous struggle.

The war came. Mr Sparkes was conscientious enough to apply his principles on industrial strife to national warfare, and refused to be in any way associated with the international struggle. He nearly lost much of his business, but in April, 1919, he was nominated a member of the committee appointed by the Building Trade Council to consider the question of scientific management and reduction of costs, with a view to enabling the building industry to render efficient public service.

The subsequent interim report, which created a sensation because of its extraordinary fresh and original ideas, was largely his handiwork, and to-day it is the charter of the Building Trades Guilds which are springing up to revolutionise the building industry.

Dundee Evening Telegraph
1920-08-10 to give talk on 'Industrial Reconstruction' at the Technical Institute in High Wycombe Bucks Herald, 1920-07-24
1920-08-27 had recently visited the Civic Education League's Summer School of Civics, at High Wycombe, and gave an account of the Building Trades Guild, with its constitution and 'parliament' Leamington Spa Courier
1920-10-23 at a weekend conference of employers and employed, under the auspices of the Yorkshire Centre of the Industrial League and Council, held at Scarborough, "Mr. Malcolm Sparkes, secretary of the London Guild of Builders, gave an address on Saturday night, on "The Work of the Building Trades Parliament." [long paragraph of reportage follows] Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer, 1920-10-25
1920-12-13 member of a deputation to Dr Addison, Minister of Health, regarding housing:

Malcolm Sparkes dealt with the increase of cost of building materials, largely due to the existence of combines and rings, and asked the Government to purchase the necessary materials through the Co-operative movement wherever possible, and thus protect the community against exploiters.

On this subject Dr. Addison was non-committal.

Daily Herald, 1920-12-14
1920/1927 of Golders Green, London The Friend
1921 of 37 Willifield Way, London, NW4
1921-01-21 secretary to the London Guild of Builders Lancashire Evening Post
  in close touch with many trade union leaders, who appreciated his efforts to reconstruct industry Collinson, ed. (1935)
1921-01-22 general manager and secretary, London Guild of Builders; letter in The Times MALCOLM SPARKES. "Guild Of Builders." Times [London, England] 22 Jan. 1921: 6. The Times Digital Archive. Web. 20 May 2015
1921-02-02 general manager and secretary, Guild of Builders (London) Ltd; letter in The Times MALCOLM SPARKES, General Manager and. "Guild Of Builders." Times [London, England] 2 Feb. 1921: 6. The Times Digital Archive. Web. 20 May 2015
1921-02-05 with Seebohm Rowntree, have been prominent advisers to Lloyd George on "a new and bold policy of industrial maintenance for workers during unemployment" Lancashire Evening Post
 

"Guild Socialism was much stimulated during World War I by the rise of the left-wing shop stewards’ movement, demanding “workers’ control” in the war industries. After the war, the building workers, led by Hobson and Malcolm Sparkes, founded building guilds that built houses for the state; but after the economic slump of 1921 the state withdrew financial help and the movement collapsed."

Britannica.com, s.v. Guild Socialism
1921-12 published "A Guildsman's Reply" The Labour Monthly Vol. 1 no. 6, pp. 520-6
1922 of 18 Wildwood Road, Hampstead Garden Suburb, London The Friend; electoral register
1922-01-18 secretary of the London Guild of Builders Dundee Courier, Dundee Evening Telegraph
1922-01-23
1922-08-19 "Mr Malcolm Sparkes, founder and secretary of the London Building Trades Guild, has resigned his office on the question of the future financial policy of the organisation." Dundee Courier
1923-02 'Organising Industry for Service' published in the English Review "Multiple Display Advertisements." Times [London, England] 1 Feb. 1923: 13. The Times Digital Archive. Web. 20 May 2015
1923-05-25 had written an ILP pamphlet on 'How Socialists Would Run Industry'; reviewed Lichfield Mercury
1923/1924 Ex-Secretary; executive committee member, AOSA AOSA Annual Reports 42/43, 1923/1924
1923/1925 living with his wife at 18 Wildwood Road, Garden Suburb, Hendon, Middlesex electoral registers
1923/1933 managing director of Drytone Ltd, architectural woodwork designers and manufacturers; the firm made panelling for both meeting houses at Friends House The Friend; Collinson, ed. (1935)
1924-10-17 advisor to the Labour Committee on industrial affairs; addressed a meeting in support of the Labour candidate at the Lecture Hall in Purley Surrey Mirror, 1924-10-24
1925 secretary of the London Building Guild "Building Guilds." Times [London, England] 7 Apr. 1925: xvi. The Times Digital Archive. Web. 20 May 2015
1926 of 68 Wildwood Road, Hampstead Garden Suburb, London, NW11 The Friend
1927 living with his wife at 18 Wildwood Road, Garden Suburb, Hendon, Middlesex electoral registers
published Modern Industry. The Christian Line of Development; published by the Student Christian Movement British Library catalogue
1927-03-21 his Modern Industry reviewed:

Many authors who tackle the subject of ethics and economics reveal a lamentable lack of knowledge of either one or the other. In this booklet, which is intended primarily for those who are concerned about the relationship between Christianity and social and industrial problems, Mr Sparkes shows himself to have some of the parboiled notions of the Socialist in regard to industrial affairs, and his notions of morality are at times equally queer. Neither his head  nor his heart functions properly. [ . . . ] While extolling service to the community, Mr Sparkes also sees fit to whitewash the General Strike. That revolutionary assault, which is now condemned by the more thoughtful Labour leaders, had precious little Christianity about it. [ . . . ]

Aberdeen Journal
1927-03-28 Modern Industry reviewed: "this valuable little book" . . . "a delightfully suggestive little volume" . . . Derby Daily Telegraph
1927/1933 lived near Potkiln Lane, near Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire The Friend
1928/1933 of High Garth, Pot Kiln Lane, Beaconsfield The Friend; National Probate Calendar
1928 living with his wife at Highgarth, Kiln Road, Chalfont St Peter, Buckinghamshire electoral register
1929-08-30 manuftr., of Highgarth, Beconsfield; with his daughter Margaret, arrived Southampton from Cherbourg on the White Star line Majestic UK incoming passenger lists
1930 living with his wife at Highgarth, Kiln Road, Chalfont St Peter, Buckinghamshire electoral register
1930/1933 of High Garth PotKiln La., Beaconsfield; tel. Beaconsfield 509 phone books
1931-02-12

HELPING INDUSTRY.

Five-Year Plan to Deal with Unemployment.

WHILE all political parties are devising schemes for dealing with unemployment, the Economic Committee of the General Council of the Trades Union Congress has been invited to discuss sympathetically a memorandum which, besides providing some novel features for dealing with the present trade depression, proposes a five-year industrial programme and a scheme calculated to cost £1,000,000,000.

The main object of the scheme, it is stated, is the relief of unemployment, and Mr Malcolm Sparkes, one of the pioneers of Guild Socialism in the building industry, is responsible for its conception.

Briefly, Mr Sparkes advocates the establishment of a British development service, the constitution and details of which would be organised by a National Industrial Council representative of all industries, and responsible to the country through Parliament.

[ . . . ]

In the view of Mr Sparkes, the scheme would gradually eliminate the need for national employment insurance, which is now costing the nation nearly fifty millions per annum. It would give greater flexibility to labour, stabilise conditions, preserve wage rates, and enable schemes of public utility to be undertaken with adequate supervision.

Mr Sparkes's scheme is calculated to cost £1,000,000,000, and his plan is that it should be embodied in a five-year industrial programme.

Recently, it is understood, the scheme came before the Emergency Committee of the Building Trades Operatives' Federation, and, in view of the proposals it contained, was sent for the consideration of the Economic Committee of the T.U.C. General Council.

The Scotsman
1932-02-14 with his wife, of Jordans Frank and Mary Pollard visitors' books
1932-12-27 with his family, visited the Pollards at 9 Denmark Road, Reading
1933-04-06 d. High Garth, Pot Kiln Lane, near Beaconsfield Bootham School Register; The Friend; National Probate Calendar; Gloucestershire Echo

PEACEMAKER DEAD

A prominent member of the Society of Friends, Mr Malcolm Sparkes, who was the originator of the Building Trades Parliament scheme out of which grew the Whitley Councils, died at his Beaconsfield home yesterday at the age of 52.

While Mr Sparkes was in prison during the War as a conscientious objector he was consulted by the Government about his proposals.

Born at Rochdale, Mr Sparkes was a founder and first general secretary of the London Guild of Builders and invented the drytone process of colouring timber without stain.

Sunderland Echo and Shipping Gazette, 1933-04-07
1933-04-08/-09 funeral diary of Mary S.W. Pollard
1933-04-14 had been largely responsible for the inauguration of the Ackworth School Old Scholars' Association Leeds Mercury, 1933-04-15
1933-05-20 will proved at London by brother Eric Sparkes and Ernest Jackson, director; effects £250 14s. 6d. National Probate Calendar
  see also: Bert de Boggende (Oct 2005) 'Reluctant absolutist: Malcolm Sparkes' Conscientious Objections to World War I', Quaker Studies 10/1; and B.D. Boggende (2001) 'Pacifism and British Labor Relations: Malcolm Sparkes's Industrial Parliament Scheme', Fides et Historia, Vol. 33 part 1: 89-108  
  a box of Malcolm Sparkes's papers, 1917/1920, is held as LIDDLE/WW1/CO/091, in the Leeds University Library Leeds University Library catalogue


Wilfred Sparkes02. Wilfrid Sparkes

1884-03-04

 "At 24, William Street, Rochdale, Mary Sophia, wife of Joseph John Sparkes, a son, who was named Wilfrid."

The Friend XXIV Apr:105; The British Friend XLII June:89

1891 scholar, living with family at 36 William St, Castleton, Rochdale, Lancashire, with a domestic servant and a nurse TNA: PRO RG 12/3331 f108 p25
1895/1899 of Reading; at Ackworth School Edgar Baron Collinson (1931) List of the Boys and Girls Admitted into Ackworth School from . . . 1879 to the end of 1930. Ackworth
1901-01-03 entered service as clerk in the coaching department, Euston Station, London & North Western Railway; starting salary £85 Railway employment records
1901 railway clerk, worker, with his brother, boarder with Septimus Martin, commercial traveller, of 35 Exeter Rd, Willesden, Middlesex PRO RG 13/1224 f123 p2
1904 of Wembley; with brothers, gave Frank & Mary Pollard a salad bowl, for their wedding present Mary S.W. Pollard, list of wedding presents
1905-01-01 salary raised to £100 Railway employment records
1906-02-01 transferred to Supt Appce
1907-01-01 salary raised to £110
1907 injured rib, in civil life Army pension records; British Army service records
1909 living with his mother in two rooms, ground and first floors (joint), furnished, at The Hawthorns, Alperton-park, Wembley electoral register
1910 salary raised to £120 Railway employment records
1910-06-17 of The Hawthorns; added to the Post Office (Harrow and Wembley) Exchanges as no 66 Harrow Observer
1911 railway clerk, railway company, worker, living with his mother and brother, and a companion help at The Hawthorns, Wembley, Middlesex; 9 rooms RG14PN7095 RG78PN347 RD130 SD1 ED28 SN218
1912/1915 living at The Hawthorns, Alperton-park, Wembley, renting two rooms, ground and first floors (joint), furnished, from his mother (of the same address), @ 10s. per week electoral registers
1915-09-18 of The Hawthorns, Wembley Frank and Mary Pollard visitors' books
1916-10-18 railway clerk; examined by St Pancras Medical Board; 5'9¾", 141 lbs, 38" chest when fully expanded, 3½" range of expansion, good physical development, 5 vaccination marks on left arm; slight vagus ankle Army pension records; British Army service records
1917-01-11 appointed to lance rank, Railway Operating Division, Royal Engineers; guard
1917-01-11/-02-14 home
1917-02-15/-04-17 BEF
1917-03-15 orders to hospl; casualty, on service
1917-04-17 to England ex 5 Gen Hos.
1917-04-18/-04-17 home
1917-06-03 "It was pleasant to hear of Wilfrid's return home: I'm not clear how far it is best to wish anyone a complete recovery in these days!" Frank Pollard, budget letter
1918-04-18 embarked B.E.F. Army pension records; British Army service records
1918-05-05 arrived Italy
1918-10-19 adm to Hos; casualty 4 days earlier
1918-11-24 to Eng. ex 81 Gen. Hos.; bronchitis & bron. pneum.
1918-04-18/-11-25 Italy
1918-10-18 adm. to hos. British Army service records
1918-11-24 to Eng. ex. 81 Gen. Hos
1918-11-26/-04-02 home Army pension records; British Army service records
1919-04-02 of The Hawthorns, Wembley, Middlesex; Sapper WR280550, Rly Tps, Royal Engineers; discharged, no longer physically fit for war service; dislocated cartilage of 9th left rib with grating and pain on general movement of the body; disability existing on enlistment aggravated by active service conditions; deemed 20% disabled on enlistment, now 30%
1920-02-20 medical board reports: no disability, no grounds for further award, pay £5 supplementary gratuity, previous award to be final
1921/1930 living with mother at "The Hawthorns", Stanley Avenue, Alperton, Wembley electoral registers
1925-09-15 rly official, of The Hawthorns, Wembley; arrived Liverpool from Quebec aboard the Canadian Pacific Montroyal; cabin class UK Incoming Passenger Lists
1930-10-13 railway official, of The Hawthorns, Wembley; arrived Liverpool from New York aboard the White Star Adriatic; cabin class UK Incoming Passenger Lists
1931 living with his mother at 55 Stanley Avenue, Alperton, Wembley; a Florence Eva Humphrey also registered there electoral register
1931-09-16 rly official, of 55 Stanley Ave, Wembley; departed Southampton for Cherbourg, aboard the Canadian Pacific Empress of Britain; 1st class passenger lists leaving UK
1932-09-17 railway official, of 18 Battlefield Rd, St Albans, Hertfordshire; departed London for Naples, aboard the Orient's Orontes; 1st class passenger lists leaving UK
1933-08-19 present at the wedding of Margaret and Reg Dale Frank and Mary Pollard visitors' books
1935 railway official National Probate Calendar
1935-05-15 of St Albans Frank and Mary Pollard visitors' books
1935-09-15 of London
1938-10-08 railway administ., of 158 Latymer Court, London, W.6; arrived Liverpool from Montreal aboard the Canadian Pacific Duchess of Bedford; cabin class UK Incoming Passenger Lists
1939-02-24 present at the funeral of Alfred Rawlings, at the Friends' Graveyard, Church Street, Reading Reading Mercury, 1939-03-04
1939-09-29 railway clerk, of 158 Latymer Court, Hammersmith, London 1939 England and Wales Register (TNA: PRO RG 101)
1940 of 158 Latymer Court, Hammersmith road, London W6 Post Office London Directories
1942
1942 of 158 Latymer Court, Hammersmith road, London W6—RIVerside 1714 London, Kelly's Post Office Directory
1945 of 158 Latymer Court, Hammersmith electoral register
1956 of 158 Latymer Court, London, W6 Ackworth Old Scholars' Association Annual Report 75 (1956)
  was much interested in family matters, and used to correspond about them with Elsie Pollard letter from Elsie Pollard to Sidney Beck, in my possession
1958-11-16 of 158 Latymer Court, London, W6; d. West London Hospital, Hammersmith The Friend; Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, Annual Reports 76-85; National Probate Calendar
1959-03-18 probate at London to The Midland Bank Executor and Trustee Company Limited; effects £3102 10s. National Probate Calendar
 

SPARKES, Wilfrid (Scholar 1895–1899), was the second of four sons of Joseph John and Mary Sophia Sparkes, of Rochdale, both parents were Ackworth Old Scholars. On leaving school he joined the staff of the London and North Western Railway at Euston and remained with the Company until he retired in 1945.

He was musical and a competent hockey player until he suffered an injury to his chest during the First World War when serving with the Royal Engineers in Italy; as a result he was seldom free from pain during the rest of his life.

He maintained his many friendships by his wonderful facility for writing letters and James Westwood writes of him . . .

"Wilfrid Sparkes was the last of four loyal Ackworthians who never spared themselves in their work for their old school—a noble band.

"For something like thirty years I have never met Wilfrid but, for many years I have enjoyed a lively and witty correspondence with him. 'Dear James,' he once wrote, 'it is delightful getting letters from you on what the B.B.C. call V.H.F. and long may it continue.'

"He bore his long illness with unbelievable fortitude and very rarely referred to it: in a recent letter however, he added—'I get on very slowly and it is a super-wearisome business.' But, despite that, I can imaging him saying:

'I have lived: nor shall malinger fortune ever

Take from me what an earlier hour once gave'

"His letters, in spite of his disabilities, were models of neatness and his handwriting marvellous. He was an amazing master of statistics especially when travel facilities, railway, shipping lines and modes of communication were concerned. He also had made a wonderful collection of Ackworthiana, to add to which was a real joy to me.

"This is the comfort of friends that, though they may be said to die, yet their friendship and society are, in the best sense, ever present, because they are immortal," Wilfrid Sparkes died November 16, 1958, aged seventy-four years.

AOSA Annual Report 78, 1959


Brian Sparkes03. Brian Sparkes, MA

1885-08-02

"William Street, Rochdale, Mary Sophia, wife of Joseph John Sparkes, a son."

The Friend XXV.299:235

"24, William Street, Rochdale, Mary Sophia, wife of Joseph John Sparkes, a son."

The British Friend XLIII Oct:254
1891 scholar, living with family at 36 William St, Castleton, Rochdale, Lancashire, with a domestic servant and a nurse TNA: PRO RG 12/3331 f108 p25
1897/1898 of Ackworth; at Ackworth School Edgar Baron Collinson (1931) List of the Boys and Girls Admitted into Ackworth School from . . . 1879 to the end of 1930. Ackworth; Edgar B. Collinson, ed. (1935) Bootham School Register
1900
1900-09/1902-07 at Bootham School Bootham School admission register; Bootham School Register
1901 of Bootham School, boarder, stu. PRO RG 13/4437 f6 p4
1902-05 "still top of the School"; on the committee of the Natural History Club at Bootham; a prize-winner for Crystals Bootham 1.1:57
1902-06 U. London Matric, First Division, Honours School of Literae Humaniores The Friend; The British Friend
1902 summer term president of the Bootham Natural History Club; one of two boys receiving a £50 scholarship Bootham 1.2:122, 150; Collinson, ed. (1935)
1904 of Wembley; with brothers, gave Frank & Mary Pollard a salad bowl, for their wedding present Mary S.W. Pollard, list of wedding presents
1909-03 . . . "has been awarded a Commoner's Exhibition for competition at the October Collections of Merton College, Oxford." Bootham 4.3:249; Collinson, ed. (1935)
1910/1913 of Merton College, Oxford; read Greats—awarded Commoners Exhibition at Merton; MA The Friend; The British Friend; Bootham School Register; Bootham 6.5:348
  played assoc. football, hockey and tennis for college; awarded Oxford Univ. Occasionals Hockey Club Colours Collinson, ed. (1935)
1910-10 . . . "has passed the Honours School in Literae Humaniores, University of Oxford." Bootham 5.2:170; Collinson, ed. (1935)
1910/1914 Classical Master and Games Master, Rydal School, Colwyn Bay; 1st Masters XI cricket and football Collinson, ed. (1935); Teachers' Registration Council registers
1911 not found in census  
1912-09  ‘Recent American Geography’—review. The British Friend XXI:243–5
1913 living in two rooms, ground and first floors (joint), furnished, at "The Hawthorns", Stanley-avenue, Wembley electoral register
1914/1916 master at Bootham Bootham School Register; The Friend; Teachers' Registration Council registers
1915-07-06 m. Grace Edith Taylor (1882–1960, b. Strand RD, d. of Henry Adams Taylor), at Jordans fmh GRO index; The Friend; diary of Mary S.W. Pollard says August, not July
1915-09-18 with his wife, of 34 Grosvenor Terrace, York Frank and Mary Pollard visitors' books
1916-01-01 professional address Bootham School, York; registered with the Teachers' Registration Council; trained in teaching at Sidcot School, Somerset Teachers' Registration Council registers
1916-10 Assistant Master at Bootham; M.A. Oxon., Classics Exhibitioner Bootham. 8.2:88
1916/1918 teaching at Ackworth Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, Annual Reports 92 and 94-100; Bootham 9.1:56; Collinson, ed. (1935)
1917-01 master at Ackworth, teaching Latin and English AOSA Annual Report 36, 1917
1918-09 AOSA Annual Report 37, 1918
Child: Anstice Mary (1919–1975, b. York) Bootham School Register; The Friend; Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, Annual Reports 92 and 94-100
1919/1945 master at Bootham; 1st Masters XI cricket and football Bootham School Register
1919-04 assistant master, teaching Classics and English

BRIAN SPARKES (1900-02, and Master 1914-16) has rejoined the Bootham staff, after a period of two years and a term at Ackworth, and friends of the school will be extremely glad to know that he and Mrs. Sparkes are back again. Brian Sparkes was formerly an exhibitioner of Merton College, Oxford, and on coming to Bootham taught Classics and English, and was class master to the Upper Schoolroom.

Bootham 9.3:154, 182
from 1922 President of Senior Reading and Debating Society, and Senior Librarian, at Bootham Collinson, ed. (1935)
1922 of 38 St Mary's, York Watson's York City Year Book
1922/1928 living with his wife at 38 St Mary's, York electoral registers
1922-12 took charge of the school while the head was on holiday in South Africa Bootham 11.3:155
1923-01-27

On the Saturday following Mr. Sparkes gave a lecture on locomotives. He made the subject interesting even to those who knew very little about it, and showed some excellent slides.

Bootham 11.4:248
1924 of 38 St Mary's, York Watson's York City Year Book
1925 of 38 St Mary's, 64 Bootham, York Kelly's Directory
of Penn house, St Mary's, York. T N 3224
1926/1928 of 38 St Mary's, York Watson's York City Year Book
1927-01-18 "Mr. Sparkes received a hearty welcome after his term's absence, and soon proved that he was fast regaining his former vigour." Bootham 13.4:213
  red-haired The Friend: 476-7, 1955-05-06
from 1927 President of Senior Essay Society at Bootham Collinson, ed. (1935)
1930 living with his wife at 38 St Mary's, York; Edith May Maskill, Maud Simpson, and Edith Wilson also registered there electoral register
1930/1955 of York Bootham School Register
1930 of 38 St Mary's, York Watson's York City Year Book
1931 living with his wife at 38 St Mary's, York; Edith May Early, Maud Simpson, and Edith Wilson also registered there electoral register
1932 of 38 St Mary's, York Watson's York City Year Book
living with his wife at 38 St Mary's, York; Edith May Early, Maud Simpson, Edith Wilson, and Dorothy Brown also registered there electoral register
1933 living with his wife at 38 St Mary's, York; Edith May Early, Eva Ellwood, and Edith Wilson also registered there electoral register
1935 housemaster of Penn House, Bootham, York; Class Master of Upper Senior; member of Ministry and Elder in York MM; Pub.—a number of Essays, and a series of Bootham "Fables," or "Fantasies"; tastes—reading, especially philosophy, religion, poetry; hobbies—botany, locomotive engineering—lectures on the subject Edgar B. Collinson, ed. (1935) Bootham School Register
living with his wife at 38 St Mary's, York; Edith May Early, Eva Ellwood, Edith Wilson, and Elizabeth Fowler also registered there electoral register
1936 of 38 St Mary's, York Watson's York City Year Book
1937 living with his wife at 38 St Mary's, York; Eva Ellwood, Edith Wilson, and Elizabeth Fowler also registered there electoral register
of 38 St Mary's, York. T N 3224 Kelly's Directory
1937-01 ill, and unable to act as President of the Bootham School Natural History, Literary and Polytechnic Society Bootham 18.6:267, 279
1937 spring term, first half

"We were all glad to find Mr. Sparkes back at work after his illness, but Penn boys, past and present, will be sorry to know that Mr. and Mrs. Sparkes have left Penn House, after living there since it was opened in 1921."

1938 spring President of the Bootham School Natural History, Literary and Polytechnic Society again
1938-06-06

Reporting on the year at Bootham, Donald Gray said that in the events of the past year at School the most important, he thought, was one that they must all regret. For many years Mr. and Mrs. Sparkes had presided at Penn House, and it had been a great chapter in the history of the School. Last summer Mr. Sparkes had to undergo a serious operation, and the doctor's orders were that he must give up the housemastership. [ . . . ] He was glad that Mr. Sparkes was now back again and in full vigour.

Bootham 19.1:23-4
1938-06-11 among those paying tribute, at York fmh, to Dr Charles Edward Hodgson, the Quaker educationist who had been killed in a road accident Leeds Mercury, 1938-06-13
1938 living with his wife at 14 Grosvenor Terrace, York electoral register
1938-07 had changed address, to 14 Grosvenor Terrace, York Bootham 19.1:32
1938/1939 of 14 Grosvenor ter, York; tel. York 4050 phone books
1939 of 14 Grosvenor Terrace, York Watson's York City Year Book
1939-02-25 of Bootham School; present at the funeral of Alexander S. Hamilton, in York Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer, 1939-02-27
1939-09-29 assistant master classics, living with his wife at The Bungalow, Helmsley, Yorkshire; a John Alexander Dell, assistant master biology, also registered there 1939 England and Wales Register (TNA: PRO RG 101)
1945-07

BRIAN SPARKES

I once heard a famous school described, from the assistant master's point of view, as "a good school to have been at." The criticism implied in this two-edged comment can never have been applied to Bootham, for few schools can have been so fortunate in the long and devoted service of their assistant masters. The thought of Brian Sparkes's 28 years not out, has led me to delve for statistics in the Register, and to make the discovery that since 1885, when the late O.B. Baynes joined the Staff, no fewer than fifteen assistant masters have averaged more than 20 years' service apiece, and some of these are going strong still. Brian Sparkes's score ranks high in these averages.

He came to Bootham in the difficult year 1914, and two years later, as a newly-married man, was despatched, as a C.O. by the Tribunal to take the place of the English Master at Ackworth, whom they had just transferred to York to work in a temporary hospital. When this futility expired, he returned to Bootham in 1919, and he has been there ever since, being the first Housemaster of Penn House and Senior Housemaster for more than 20 years. During this long period he has played a leading part in many school activities.

I have always regretted that I left Bootham ten years too soon to be taught Latin by Sparkes. Though it is unfashionable in Quaker circles to admit it, Latin, as he taught it with his high standard of accuracy and clear-thinking, remains surpassed as a grounding for the educated man. He never spared himself, and expected from those he taught the same thoroughness that characterised all that he did himself. Moreover, though Latin is usually classed as a "dead language," he never allowed you to forget that it once had been very much alive and that the culture which evolved it still lives in all of us.

Some might regard Brian Sparkes as a martinet, but his discipline, which never was in question, was achieved almost without recourse to punishment and, if his wit and sarcasm inspired awe, he never used them to lash any but the slacker or the fool.

No boy ever outwitted Brian Sparkes. I can remember one instance—how I heard of it I cannot now imagine, for it was certainly not from the principal actor himself—when a very bold member of E Latin one April Fools' Day had fastened the duster to the drawer with a concealed drawing-pin and doctored the chalk. The usual silence reigned as B.S. entered the class-room, but on this occasion it was heavy with delicious expectancy. Without allowing a smile to betray his appreciation of the situation, B.S. slowly drew a clean duster from his pocket and proceeded to clean the board. But hope did not die completely until a fresh piece of chalk emerged from the same place. Who can wonder at his prestige!

No boy now at school with think of B.S. as a gamesman; but those whose hair is now grey will recall that at school he won his First Master's colours at cricket and football, was Games Master at Rydal Mount, before he came to Bootham, and for many years after that, until serious illness removed him from the field, was a stalwart of the Bootham teams. Not, perhaps, a brilliant performer, except at hockey, for which he won his colours with the Oxford University Occasionals, he was always a batsman to rely on, or a half-back whose dogged persistence and accuracy often held the side together.

Anyone who knew the Senior Essay and the Senior Debating Societies before he entered on his long presidency of both, will have been struck by the immense advance in writing and speaking achieved during that quarter century. They were Brian Sparkes's particular concern. It often fell to his lot, as President of the Essay Society, to express public comment on immature youthful efforts. His criticisms were always constructive, informed with a wisdom born of experience, and skilled in selecting for commendation what was good. Often have I admired his chairmanship of the Committees of these Societies. Always full of original ideas himself, he never imposed them on others, but had the rare gift of calling out talent and instigating collaboration. He and his wife contrived and made a triumphant success of those memorable summer evening "Collations," at which many had their first experience of after-dinner speaking in welcoming a distinguished guest.

Sparkes, like others of his family, possessed a remarkable gift for organisation. Twice he was called upon to exercise it as Headmaster, once when A.R. was visiting South Africa, and again, many years later, after the death of Donald Gray. It was no easy task thus to be called upon to direct the work of his colleagues, but the Committee's choice was an obvious and a wise one, and on both occasions the life of the school ran smoothly under his tactful and capable leadership.

Who now remembers, I wonder, a riotous evening towards the end of the first period, when the whole staff unbent in an extravagant entertainment to the School? B.S., in blue pierrot costume, for once showed off his great gifts as a mimic and comic narrator, previously known only to his colleagues. Two others fought a tough round with the gloves, that threatened at moments to become too serious, while everybody sang. It was B.'s idea that two of us should sing different songs at the same time. I can't remember who won. Perhaps this was a mistake, for he had a good voice himself, that I can only remember hearing once on the J.B. platform, and that was in a masters' quartet. He did much for the music of the school in those days; he and his wife, who is an accomplished pianist, kept the Music Society going, before there was a resident music-master.

He is a keen botanist, too, and many will recall his suggestive and stimulating exhortations as curator of botany, or the delight he took in making a beautiful garden at Penn.

For many years an Elder, he was deeply concerned for the ministry at Clifford Street. His own ministry, which was saturated with his wide reading in philosophy and poetry, if it usually passed over the heads of the very young, often stimulated and braced the older boys, for it possessed those classical qualities of clarity and allusiveness, regrettably rare in Quaker utterance, that too frequently has recourse to bogus sentiment and woolly benevolence. For the School he composed a series of fables that were eagerly awaited and long remember. Witty, topical and allusive, they were brilliantly entertaining, while they aroused just the lively discussion that their author intended. Why has only one of them been published?

On re-reading what I have written, I am struck with horror by its resemblance to an obituary notice, and in one sense I think it is, for school memory is short, and when "Plug" returns, as I hope he will in the future, to give his lecture on "British Locomotives I have worshipped," the Headmaster will have to introduce him to youngsters to whom the Sparkes legend has already grown dim. That is the price that a schoolmaster must always pay. May he carry into retirement the knowledge that the high standards he always set himself and exacted from generations of his pupils have played an important part in making Bootham the great school we know and love.

We all wish him and his wife many years of health and leisure in the better world, which his clear thinking, devotion and wisdom have assuredly helped to build.

P.C

Bootham 22.2:44-45
1946-12-09 of 14 Grosvenor Terrace, York Frank and Mary Pollard visitors' books
1955-04-16 of 14 Grosvenor Terrace, York; d. The County Hospital, York Bootham School Register; The Friend; National Probate Calendar; Find a Grave
  bur. York fbg, Yorkshire Find a Grave

SPARKES.—April 16, BRIAN SPARKES, late of Bootham School, dear husband of Grace E. Sparkes—Interment Friends' Burial Ground, York, tomorrow (Tuesday), 2.30 p m

Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer, 1955-04-18
1955-07-22 will proved at York by widow Grace Edith Sparkes; effects £12,611 15s. National Probate Calendar
 

Brian Sparkes

In warm sunshine at York a company of Friends gathered at the Friends Burial Ground with Grace Sparkes and her daughter Anstice to give thanks for the life of Brian Sparkes, and all that it has meant to the meeting at Clifford Street and the well-being of Bootham.

Fifty-five years ago a red-haired little boy came on from Ackworth to Bootham and rapidly went up the school. He was fortunate in having among his masters men like Neave Brayshaw, Francs Sturge, and his own uncle Francis Pollard; and in Meeting he listened to the ministry of scholars like Fielden Thorpe, Edward Worsdell, and John Wilhelm Rowntree.

Brian Sparkes was exceptional, even as a boy, and his hobbies included such diverse interests as plants, old churches, and the engine sheds at York Station, used in those days by nine different railway companies. In later years he lectured on the development of the locomotive and the superheating system.

After leaving school, and some preliminary study at London, he joined the little group of Bootham boys at Oxford, where he read Greats and was awarded a Commoner's Exhibition at Merton. Though his tastes were always scholarly, increased physical strength helped to make him a competent games player, especially at hockey, which he played for the University Occasionals, And, though quiet and orderly himself, he thoroughly savoured the college life of those mellow boisterous years before the first World War.

Except for a few years at Ackworth, almost all his active life was spent at Bootham. He was an exacting and successful master. His boys sat in some awe of him, but they respected and responded to the clarity of his teaching. Even the laggards drove themselves to attain the 'usual standard' whenever those words appeared in his perfect handwriting on the Upper Schoolroom blackboard before a Latin test.

Like many strong characters, he was not always easy to work with. His health was not robust, and colleagues sometimes found him irritable and impatient. But in the absence or illness of the Headmaster he was the obvious Acting Head. His appraisal of boy nature was remarkable, and, when reports were being considered, his private comments for the delectation and edification of other Housemasters were eagerly examined, and most illuminating.

This faculty made him an ideal president (for more than 20 years) of the Senior Debating and Essay Societies. Under his guidance boys learned to pass an essay in review with considerable discernment. He himself seldom omitted to make some constructive criticism on whatever had been read—remarks which were much looked-for and never hurtful—no mean achievement in one who had a ready and rather caustic wit. The standard of writing steadily rose, and the society grew in numbers and repute. His own writing was not extensive, but his Bootham Fables, given to the School from time to time on Sunday evenings, were delightful essays of serious purpose in humorous guise, and intensely appreciated.

Classical scholars with a deep concern for the spiritual life have not been numerous, even at Clifford Street. The Biblical knowledge of Brian, Sparkes, his scholarship and philosopher's training, combined with his gift for clear expression, made his ministry more than ordinarily helpful to many. Indeed, as was most fittingly said at the graveside, in following his thought one became debtor with him, to the Jew first and also to the Greek.

In the last years of his life there came upon him much physical weakness and a disconcerting forgetfulness in little everyday concerns, from which, however, he was very largely shielded by the devoted attentions of his wife.

V.W.A.

The Friend: 476-7, 1955-05-06; reprinted in Bootham 26.5, 1955-11


Eric Sparkes04. Eric Sparkes, MC

1889-05-10

"At 24, William Street, Rochdale, Mary Sophia, wife of Joseph John Sparkes, a son, who was named Eric."

The Friend XXIX June:182; The British Friend XLVII June ads:8
1891 living with family at 36 William St, Castleton, Rochdale, Lancashire, with a domestic servant and a nurse TNA: PRO RG 12/3331 f108 p25
1898/1904 of Ackworth; at Ackworth School Edgar Baron Collinson (1931) List of the Boys and Girls Admitted into Ackworth School from . . . 1879 to the end of 1930. Ackworth; Edgar B. Collinson, ed. (1935) Bootham School Register
1901 stu., of Ackworth School PRO RG 13/4308 f187 p12
1903-09-04 . . . "Cuthbert Irwin (Lil’s eldest boy) and Eric Sparkes (Sophie’s youngest): they are nice chaps" . . . letter from Frank Pollard to Mary Spence Watson
1904 of Wembley; with brothers, gave Frank & Mary Pollard a salad bowl, for their wedding present Mary S.W. Pollard, list of wedding presents
1904-09/1906 at Bootham School Bootham School admission register; Bootham School Register
1906-07-29 of Wembley Frank and Mary Pollard visitors' book
1906-09

E. Sparkes came to school in September, 1904, and leaves No. 18 on the list. He has passed London Matric this Summer; has played regularly in both 2nd elevens, being a pretty "bat"; and has been an influential member of the photographic club. His photos of the Bootham School Camp are famous, being published in this magazine a year ago. He is following his brother in entering the office of a firm of furniture-designers.

Bootham, Vol. III, No. 2, p. 135
1908 photos of Bootham School Camp exhibited in 'Bootham' section of Franco-British Exhibition Collinson, ed. (1935)
1908-11-07/-10 of Wembley; stayed with Frank and Mary Pollard in York Frank and Mary Pollard visitors' book
1909-11-05/-08
1908/1916 Asst Sec. Ackworth OSA Collinson, ed. (1935); AOSA Annual Report 28, 1909
1910/1912 of The Hawthornes, Wembley; Badge and Colour Secretary of Ackworth Old Scholars' Association  AOSA Annual Report
1911 draughtsman, woodworking firm, worker, living with his mother and brother, and a companion help at The Hawthorns, Wembley, Middlesex; 9 rooms RG14PN7095 RG78PN347 RD130 SD1 ED28 SN218
1911/12 of The Hawthornes, Wembley; District Secretary, Foreign and Colonial branch of Ackworth Old Scholars' Association AOSA Annual Report 30, 1911
1913 living in one room, first floor, front, furnished, at "The Hawthorns", Stanley-avenue, Wembley; 5s. 6d. per week electoral register
1913-07-28/-30 of Wembley; stayed with Frank and Mary Pollard at 44 Queen Anne's Road, York Frank and Mary Pollard visitors' books
by 1914-11 serving with the armed forces Bootham 7.2:148-149
1914/1920 private, Royal Army Medical Corps; second service, second lieutenant, Royal Berkshire Regiment medal card
1915-03 R.A.M.C. Bootham 7.3:190
1916-03 R.A.M.C., Malta Bootham 7.6:362
1916-10 "E. SPARKES wrote in July from the coast of Greece." Bootham 8.2:114
1918-02 R.A.M.C. Bootham 8.6:371
1918 of Upper Grove House (The Gardens), Roehampton Lane, Putney, SW15; 8176 Sgt, 1st Bn, K.O. Yorks. L.I. electoral register
1918-09-18/-19 T/2Lt, of 5th Bn Royal Berkshire Regiment; awarded MC at Tetard Wood, near Épehy Britain, Campaign, Gallantry & Long Service Medals & Awards
1918-09-22
1919 of Upper Grove House Gardens, Roehampton Lane, Putney, SW15; 80457 Sgt, 1st Bn, K.O. Yorks. L.I. electoral register
1920-08-27 m. Winifred Lidbetter (of Halifax, 1886–1971, b. Axbridge RD, d. of Thomas & Elizabeth Lidbetter), at Halifax fmh Bootham School Register; The Friend; Ackworth Old Scholars' Association, Annual Reports, 61-64; GRO index
1921/1922 of 30 The Gardens, Vaughan Road, Harrow-on-the-Hill electoral registers
1923/1924 living with his wife at 30 The Gardens, Vaughan Road, Harrow-on-the-Hill
1925/1927 of 30 The Gardens, Vaughan Road, Harrow-on-the-Hill
1928/1930 of Norland, Battlefield rd, St Albans, Hertfordshire; tel. St Albans 1107 phone books
1932/1938 of Norland, 51 Battlefield rd, St Albans, Hertfordshire; tel. St Albans 1107 phone books; Kelly's Directory, 1937
  sales manager, of St Albans Bootham School Register
1933-05-20 commercial traveller; co-executor of will of brother Malcolm Sparkes National Probate Calendar
1935 sales manager, of Norland, Battlefield Road, St Albans, Hertfordshire; hobbies—photography, amateur dramatic work Collinson, ed. (1935)
1939-09-29 assistant sales manager, steel manufacturers, on [loan] to Ministry of Supply from Steel Control; living with his wife at 29 Ranmoor Rd, Sheffield, Yorkshire 1939 England and Wales Register (TNA: PRO RG 101)
1939 of 119 Walton rd, Stockton Heath; tel. Stockton Heath 627 phone books
  of Warrington, Lancashire; Sheffield, Yorkshire; and Wimbledon, London source misplaced
1949-03-06 of 95 Merton Hall Road, Wimbledon, London, SW19; d. there The Friend; Bootham School Register; National Probate Calendar; "Deaths." Times [London, England] 8 Mar. 1949: 1. The Times Digital Archive. Web. 20 May 2015
1949-06-04 will proved at London by widow Winifred Sparkes and Reginald Pardoe Yates, insurance official; effects £6487 10s. 7d. National Probate Calendar


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