Children of Reuben and Louisa Beck 

01. Charles Ernest Beck

1876-12-20 b. 17 Regent Place, New Road, Chatham birth certificate; Beck family Bible
1878-05-27 d. 5 Upper Mount, Chatham, of hydrocephalus 5 months certified death certificate


Angela Louisa (Beck) Herring 02. Angeler Louisa Beck (Angelina, Angie)

1878-04-17 b. 5 Mount, New Road, Chatham birth certificate; Beck family bible. As Angeler Louisa on certificate of naming and in 1911 census
1881 of 78 Regents Place, Chatham St Mary, living with mother, sister, and aunt TNA: PRO RG 11/894 f81 p1
1891 kitchen maid (domestic servt), of Walmer Lodge, Walmer, Kent; household of Alexander Tod, retired Egyptian merchant PRO RG 12/739 f48 p6
1900-05-21 witness to aunt Henrietta Maud Jarvis’s wedding, St Paul’s, Chatham aunt’s marriage certificate; parish register
1901 shop assistant (draper), worker, living with family at 59 Salisbury Road, Chatham RG 13/728 f87 p27
1911 draper's assistant, manageress, worker, living with family in 7 rooms at 2 Thorold Road, Luton, Chatham RG14PN3917 RG78PN149 RD47 SD1 ED33 SN203
1912-09-28 of 78 New Road, Chatham; m. Arthur Herring (1878–1917, chief engine room artificer 2nd class on destroyer HMS Torrent, either mined in the North Sea while going to meet a convoy or torpedoed by a German submarine off the Maas Lightship), at St Paul's Church, Chatham, after banns; witnesses Reuben Beck and Constance Herring National Probate Calendar; information from Sidney Beck; GRO index; CWGC, accessed 2010-08-18; Naval History via Flix, accessed 2010-08-18; battleships-cruisers, accessed 2010-08-18; parish register
1917-12-23 of 21 Malvern Road, Gillingham, Kent UK, Royal Navy and Royal Marine War Graves Roll, 1914-1919
1918-01-31 executor of husband's will National Probate Calendar
1933

Angela had a shop on the top road in Gillingham, on the Watling Street, had her own draper's shop after she retired as manageress at the Co-op—and there I used to visit quite often, even right up till I started work after 18.

The Memoirs of Sidney Beck
  . . . "kept a shop on the Rainham Rd (a drapers shop). For many years she was a shopwalker at Gillingham co-op then she opened her own shop" information from Anne Aldred
 

. . . she was the eldest of my father’s sisters, and she was quite an important part of my childhood in so far as she was always at her parents’ home, or at her own house, in the north of Gillingham, and we used to see quite a lot of her as a child, when I went to visit my grandparents; and—and I had quite a number of occasions, be with her.

She was quite an imposing personality, quite—very. At the time when I most remember her, was when she was the proprietor of a milliner’s shop on Watling Street, the main thoroughfare from the south end of the town, runs from the Medway towns down to Canterbury. Number 68 Watling Street was the address of the shop. She always dressed very primly, and in fashion—and she had a very strong presence the whole time, as though she was the madam of the shop, and all the other assistants obeyed her orders, very, very quickly. She had a very educated voice, and she always behaved—very (what I would—I don’t know whether obsequiously is the right expression?)—but quite a formal presence when handling customers, as well as relatives. My own mother was always a bit afraid of her, overawed by her. My mother was quite a short person, compared with her rather big stature—and my mother was quite a simple woman—and simple speech and—no affected airs about her at all. I think she was a bit overawed by the rather shop-presence that Aunt Angela always presented, even when she was off-duty, as it were. She was very knowledgeable about business, and affairs, and so forth—she probably felt my mother was a bit beneath her, or not educated, or not knowledgeable . . . It may be that it was just a childish impression I have, of the relationship, but I know my mother was always, even when she was first married she always felt rather overawed by Aunt Angela. She had a very strong temper. I think I may have told you in the past how she fell out with her younger sister, my Aunt Elsie, and how at one time Aunt Angela was the head, sort of floor-manager, of the big Co-op drapery and millinery stores, in the High Street of Gillingham. It was a very big shop, on about four floors, with a lift in it, and I remember it as a shop where they had the cashier’s office in the centre of the ground floor, connected by overhead pulley system, so that the money and the bill was put into a little cylinder container, and a lever was pulled, and this was transmitted to the cashier in the centre of the shop, and—it was quite a big shop, and very busy. Aunt Angela was the head of all the female staff there; and she had got a post for her youngest sister, Elsie. Elsie was one of the junior assistants there, for a time. Elsie was quite high-spirited, and full of fun. Once Aunt Angela had to discipline her, for not conforming to the rules—I don’t quite know the actual incident at all, but I got the impression that she had given Elsie a dressing-down in front of all the staff, or of the particular section where she was working. Elsie was in a flaming temper, and resented this, and never forgave her, Angela, for humiliating her in that way. My understanding was that they never spoke to each other from that day onwards—or that’s the impression I’ve been given. This led to difficulties within the family circle, and I think accounted for Elsie eventually leaving home and going along, marrying someone who took her up to Newcastle, and—they had very little contact with the rest of the family.

But Angela did have this very strong, dominating, personality. But she looked after her sister, my Aunt Dorothy, or Aunt Dolly, who was—even when I can remember her—crippled with arthritis of the neck. She had a curvature of the spine, and she always sat in an armchair at the table. She could move around with a stick—but always crouching, bent well forward, and her head looking down on the ground, and she looked at you from the top of her eyes. She was more or less housebound. But Aunt Angela sort of looked after her when her mother died, my grandmother. I remember going to the house when she was living with my grandmother, well when my grandmother died she moved into Aunt Angela’s house, which wasn’t very far away, and was looked after by Aunt Angela.

Aunt Angela was also very good to me in the time I went to the grammar school, when I passed for the scholarship, and had to go to the grammar school. It meant having a new uniform, and new clothing, and—quite a lot of expense involved. She was very good at helping to buy my uniform. I can’t remember whether it was while I was waiting to go to the grammar school, or whether it was another occasion after I’d been at the grammar school—but she took me with her, to London, when she was buying stock for her shop. She used to go to the Houndsditch Warehouse, in East London; and she took me up with her, just to—as a matter of interest, really, to see the sights of London, and see what the Houndsditch Warehouse was like, and what she did. She took me up there with my cousin Dorothy, Dorothy Carr that is now. I have still a very vivid recollection of getting out at London Bridge station, and then going over London Bridge, walking to Houndsditch Warehouse—it’s not very far from London Bridge. I think I spent most of the time there, while she was doing her purchases, travelling up and down on the lifts; they had these open lifts—no doors on the lifts—and continuously moving, lift, and you hopped in as it passed, and hopped out as it passed the next floor, or how many floors you went up; Dorothy and I spent quite a lot of time, I remember, hopping in and out of these lifts at different floors. So I don’t have much knowledge of how she went about her purchases, and what sort of things she purchased. I think she took me on that visit to see one or two of the sights of London, like St Paul’s, I think, and the immediate area of the City, but we didn’t do any sort of large-scale sightseeing on that expedition. But it was certainly one of the memorable occasions of Aunt Angela.

Were you yourself rather in awe of her?

Well I always felt I had to mind my Ps and Qs with her, but I certainly didn’t feel at a disadvantage with her; and she always seemed to like my visits to the home. I used to play cards with my Aunt Dorothy, who was chair-bound, she liked visitors, someone to have some attention—so I went there fairly often—I’m talking now about my grammar school days, between twelve and eighteen—because it wasn’t very far from my school, and didn’t mean a great deal extra out of my way, I could call in there on my way home, and I didn’t mind the walking. We used to play quite a lot of cardgames with her, whist—particularly she was fond of—and solo, solo whist. I don’t remember whether we played any board games like draughts. I don’t think she played chess. But I also listened to her radio with her—she liked having the Promenade concerts on, and I would sit with her, listening to a concert. I imagine I had quite a few teas there, or refreshments, of some sort or other, over the years. But I used to see Aunt Dorothy and my grandmother when I went as a small boy, before grammar school times, on a Saturday or a Sunday, going to collect a large bowl of dripping, to take back for my father for his midday sandwiches that at one stage she was always providing, this dripping for him.

The Memoirs of Sidney Beck
1939-09-29 draper shop keeper, of 68 Watling Street, Gillingham, Kent; living with her sister Dorothy, and a domestic servant 1939 England and Wales Register (TNA: PRO RG 101)
by 1946-07-07 had a television set Sidney Beck's diary
1962-12-28 of 91 Malvern Road, Gillingham, Kent; d. Chatham RD information from Sidney Beck; GRO index; National Probate Calendar
1962-03-04 will proved at London by Albert Stanley Roe, Dorothy Eleanor Carr and Nellie Elsie Paton; effects £8560 14s. National Probate Calendar


Eleanor Matilda (Beck) Willis 03. Eleanor Matilda Beck (Nell, Nelly)

1880-01-19 b. 3 Whittaker Place, New Road, Chatham, Kent birth certificate; Beck family bible
1881 as Helen, of 78 Regents Place, Chatham St Mary, living with mother, sister, and aunt TNA: PRO RG 11/894 f81 p1
1891 scholar, living with family at 4 Chatham Place, Walmer, Kent PRO RG 12/739 f79 p29
1901 draper's assistant, servant, worker, of 124 Upper Tooting Rd, Streatham, London, one of four such in the household of Ch. W. Ogburn, draper RG 13/471 f43 p21
1902-04-07 of 59 Salisbury Road, Chatham; m. Charles Willis (1874 – after 1922, plumber, later painter, Scottish in origin), at St Paul's church, Chatham, after banns; witnesses William and Mary Willis information from Sidney Beck; GRO index; Marriage Locator; The Memoirs of Sidney Beck; 1911 Census of Canada; parish register
Children: Nellie Doris M. (1903 – after 1922, b. Kingston RD), William Charles (1909–1990, b. Toronto, Ontario, Canada) GRO index; 1911 Census of Canada; 1921 Census of Canada; Ontario, Canada Marriages, 1801-1928; information from Sidney Beck; Borsk family tree
1903-05-10 of 21 Cecil Villas, Wimbledon, Surrey Merton parish register
  emigrated to Canada, and believed to have live in the Toronto or Ottawa area The Memoirs of Sidney Beck
1904/5 went to Canada family tree in Sidney Beck's diary
1906 or 1907 immigrated to Canada with husband and daughter 1911 Census of Canada; 1921 Census of Canada
1906-09-26 with her husband and daughter, departed Liverpool for Montreal aboard the Lake Manitoba passenger lists leaving UK
1909 son born at 43 Sully Cres., Toronto, Ontario, Canada Ontario, Canada Births, 1869-1913
1911 living with family at 45 Sully Cres., Toronto West, Ontario; Anglican; held $150 insurance, at $8 premium 1911 Census of Canada
1921 living with family at 19 Teignmouth, York Township, York South, Ontario 1921 Census of Canada
1922 presumably of 19 Teignmouth Ave, Toronto (daughter's place of residence at marriage) Ontario, Canada Marriages, 1801-1928
1954-10-03 d. Canada information from Sidney Beck


Maud Emily (Beck) Bartlett 04. Maud Emily Beck

1881-07-03 b. Regents Place, 78 New Road, Chatham birth certificate; family Bible; registration of death
1891 scholar, living with family at 4 Chatham Place, Walmer, Kent TNA: PRO RG 12/739 f79 p29
1901 dress maker, worker, living with family at 59 Salisbury Road, Chatham RG 13/728 f87 p27
1908 immigrated to Canada 1911 Census of Canada; The Memoirs of Sidney Beck
1909-04-05 m. Frederick Bartlett (1878 – after 1945, b. Ontario), in Toronto, Ontario, Canada information from Sidney Beck; The Memoirs of Sidney Beck; 1911 Census of Canada; Ontario, Canada Births, 1869–1913; Find a Grave
1911 living with husband at 268 Lisgar, Toronto West, Ontario; Anglican 1911 Census of Canada
1912 of 268 Lisgar, Toronto West Ontario, Canada Births, 1869–1913
Child: Constance Mary L. (1912 – ?, b. Toronto) Ontario, Canada Births, 1869–1913; information from Sidney Beck
1921 not found in Canadian census  
1945-12-24 housewife, of 173 Hope St, York, Toronto, Ontario; d. there, of coronary thrombosis 1 day, caused by arterio-sclerosis, and influenza 3 days registration of death; information from Sidney Beck; Find a Grave
1945-12-27 bur. Prospect Cemetery, Toronto, Ontario registration of death; Find a Grave


Reuben Alexander Beck 05. Reuben Alexander Beck


06. Ethel Alice Beck

1889-01-09 b. A. House, North Barracks, Walmer Depot birth certificate; Beck family Bible; RG 14/10117 RD195 ED5 SN75, which gives birthplace as Deal
1890-04-13 bapt. Walmer, Kent Royal Marines register of baptisms
1891 living with family at Chatham Place, Walmer, Kent TNA: PRO RG 12/739 f79 p29
1901 living with family at 59 Salisbury Road, Chatham, Kent RG 13/728 f87 p27
1911 draper's assistant, boarding with Sarah A. Thomas and family at 11 Leigham Ct Drive, Leigh on Sea, Essex RG 14/10117 RD195 ED5 SN75
1911-10-04 of 2 Thorold Road, Chatham; m. Leonard William Scutchings (1889 – after 1943, baker, s. of John William and Eliza M. (Umn) Scutchings), at Christ Church, Luton, Kent, after banns; witnesses: Reuben Beck, Robert Merry information from Sidney Beck; The Memoirs of Sidney Beck; GRO index; Marriage Locator; parish register; Canada, Soldiers of the First World War, 1914–1918; Detroit Border Crossings and Passenger and Crew Lists, 1905–1957; Canada, Imperial War Service Gratuities; Scutchings Family Tree; British Army WWI service records
illegible date of 18 Seaforth Avenue, Toronto, Canada; 18s. 1d. payable weekly from 29 September 1907 British Army WWI Service Records, 1914–1920
  emigrated to Canada, and believed to have lived in the Toronto or Ottawa area; adopted two boys The Memoirs of Sidney Beck
1914-04-17 with husband, departed Liverpool aboard the Empress of Ireland, bound for Halifax, Nova Scotia UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890–1960
1919-03-27 of 11 Hunter St, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Canada, Soldiers of the First World War, 1914–1918
1920-03-19 of 137½ Bee St, Toronto, Ontario Canada, Imperial War Service Gratuities
1921 living with her husband at 137½ Bee St, York Township, York, Ontario; Church of England 1921 Canadian census
1943-08-07 Canadian nationality; admitted at Detroit, Michigan, for a visit of under 29 days Detroit Border Crossings
1947-05-10 d. Canada, suddenly information from Sidney Beck; Reuben A. Beck, pocket diary; family tree in Sidney Beck's diary says 1955, Canada


07. Edgar Percival Beck

1890-03-16 b. A. House, North Barracks, Walmer Depot birth certificate; Beck family Bible
1890-04-13 bapt. Walmer, Kent Royal Marines register of baptisms
1891 living with family at 4 Chatham Place, Walmer, Kent TNA: PRO RG 12/739 f79 p29
1901 living with family at 59 Salisbury Road, Chatham, Kent PRO RG 13/728 f87 p27
1911 general labourer, unemployed, living with family at 2 Thorold Road, Luton, Chatham RG14PN3917 RG78PN149 RD47 SD1 ED33 SN203
1917-12-14 assistant foreman, HM Gun Wharf; d. 2 Thorold Road, Chatham, Medway, of mitral stenosis and regurgitation death certificate; family tree in Sidney Beck's diary says killed in Navy
  bur. Chatham cemetery ?information from Sidney Beck


Dorothy Catherine (Beck) Merry 08. Dorothy Catherine Beck (Doll, Dolly)

1891-08-31 b. 4 Chatham Place or 2 Cambell Road, Walmer birth certificate; Beck family Bible
1901 living with family at 59 Salisbury Road, Chatham TNA: PRO RG 13/728 f87 p27
1911 draper's assistant, worker, living with family at 2 Thorold Road, Luton, Chatham PRO RG14PN3917 RG78PN149 RD47 SD1 ED33 SN203
1913-03-24 of 2 Thorold Road, Chatham; m. Robert Charles Merry (1890–1917), at Christ Church pc, Luton, Kent; witnesses Reuben Beck, Florence Merry, Hilda May Beck, David Harry Pankhurst information from Sidney Beck; GRO index; CWGC; parish register
Child: Dorothy Eleanor (1914–1997) GRO index
 

. . . my Aunt Dorothy, or Aunt Dolly, who was—even when I can remember her—crippled with arthritis of the neck. She had a curvature of the spine, and she always sat in an armchair at the table. She could move around with a stick—but always crouching, bent well forward, and her head looking down on the ground, and she looked at you from the top of her eyes. She was more or less housebound. But Aunt Angela sort of looked after her when her mother died, my grandmother. I remember going to the house when she was living with my grandmother, well when my grandmother died she moved into Aunt Angela’s house, which wasn’t very far away, and was looked after by Aunt Angela.

. . . Dorothy was an invalid, and I remember she had a chiropractor to come and give her massage, and help her get some relief from the disability. I think a chiropractor in those days was quite an advanced form of treatment—people didn’t believe in non-medical people—I don’t think he was actually a faith-healer, although I think she may have experimented with the faith-healers; or whether this chiropractor also felt he had healing in his hands, and that this was part of his secret of his manipulation, I don’t know—somehow, I’ve a vague recollection that there was a feeling that her treatment was partly faith-healing, as much as manipulation.

Did it do any good?

Well it gave her temporary relief—never cured her; I don’t quite know what her ailment was, what the origin of it was, I can’t remember now—if I ever knew.

Had she worked at all, before she . . . ?

I think she must have done, and—I think she must have had her daughter, Dorothy, my cousin Dorothy, when she was well, and fit to have children. So I don’t know at what stage this illness developed.

. . . she always looked older because of her illness, and the fact that she wasn’t able to move very fast, always gave the impression of being older; but—mentally she was always certainly a young person, she was always very bright and interested in what I was doing, and interested in the world, and, being a devoted listener to the radio she was very well-informed, from that point of view.

The Memoirs of Sidney Beck
1939-09-29 incapacitated, of 68 Watling Street, Gillingham, Kent; living with her sister Angeler, and a domestic servant 1939 England and Wales Register (TNA: PRO RG 101)
1939-11-07 d. Medway RD information from Sidney Beck; GRO index
1939-11-11 bur. information from Sidney Beck

OBITUARY.

MRS. D.C. MERRY.

As reported in our last issue, the death of Mrs. Dorothy C. Merry, of 68, Watling-street, Gillingham, took place on the 7th inst., after a very long illness, which she had borne with great courage and fortitude. The deceased lady leaves one daughter to mourn her loss. The funeral took place on Saturday at Chatham Cemetery, the Rev. R.V. Bristow (Vicar of St. Augustine's Church, Gillingham) officiating. The mourners were Messrs. Reuben Beck (brother), Alec Beck (nephew), David Pankhurst (brother-in-law), Arthur Pankhurst (nephew), Albert Merry (brother-in-law), Arthur Carr (son-in-law). Beautiful floral tributes were received from:—

Dorothy and Arthur (daughter and son-in-law); Baby Robert (grandson); Angela (sister); Reuben and Ruth (brother and sister-in-law); Hilda, Dave and Joyce (sister and brother-in-law); Alec, Mary and family; Percy and Eileen; Sidney, William, Gladys and Edgar; Dave and Klara; Edna and Arthur; Nellie; Aunt Maud; Hilda and Albert; Millie; Nell and Dora (Southsea); Via and Freda; Minnie; Mabel and Arthur; Mary and Gordon; Douglas; Pop and Bertie; Marjorie, Bob, Mrs. Wells and Alec; Gladys; The Parker Family; Nellie, Roy and Family; Gert, Will and Doris; Nora; Bessie Grace; Bessie Vincent; Alf. and Maud; Mrs. Crosscombe and Olive; Harry and Anne Foster; Mr. and Mrs. Phillips; Mr. and Mrs. Nicholls and family; Mr. and Mrs. Robertson; Mr. and Mrs. Billinghurst and Georgina; Mr. and Mrs. Bradshaw; Mr. and Mrs. Morton and family; Mr. and Mrs. Norman and Minnie; Mr. and Mrs. Belcher; E. Morrison and H. Allison; M. Holmes; J. Crossley; Eva Banks; Gyllie; Mrs. and Miss Gay.

Chatham News, 1939-11-17
1939-11-17

THE Daughter and Sister of Mrs. DOROTHY C. MERRY wish to thank all relatives and friends for letters of condolence and beautiful floral tributes sent in their recent bereavement.

Chatham News


Hilda May (Beck) Pankhurst 09. Hilda May Beck

1894-07-05 b. 24 Clover Str., Chatham, Kent Beck family Bible
1894-07-05 b. 88 New Road, Chatham birth certificate
1901 living with family at 59 Salisbury Road, Chatham TNA: PRO RG 13/728 f87 p27
1911 draper's assistant, worker, living with family at 2 Thorold Road, Luton, Chatham PRO RG14PN3917 RG78PN149 RD47 SD1 ED33 SN203
1914-04-11 of 2 Thorold Road; m. David Harry Pankhurst (1891–1974, patternmaker—government dkyd), Christ Church, Luton, Kent, after banns; witnesses: Reuben Beck, Henry David George Smith GRO index; RG14PN3914 RG78PN149 RD47 SD1 ED30 SN318; Orwin, accessed 2010-08-07; parish register
Children: David Charles (1914–1968), Arthur Harry (1916–2000), Edna May (1918–2005), Joyce Hilda (1929-2014) GRO index; information from Sidney Beck and Geoff Pankhurst; Orwin, accessed 2010-08-07; Find a Will
 

. . . Hilda did become much more of a real person to us—she had married David Pankhurst, who was a draughtsman in the drawing office, of the Naval Dockyard at Chatham; who had been sent to Rosyth, during the war—I think they thought it was a safer place, to have the drawing office there—Chatham Dockyard was so near, likely to be bombed, damaged—so a lot of the work was transferred from Chatham Dockyard up to Rosyth Dockyard, near Edinburgh. I think Hilda and Dave must have married before, she joined him up there, in Rosyth. They stayed there, till their two sons, my cousin David and cousin Arthur, and my other cousin Edna—they were at school in Scotland—then some time in the 1930s, when I was at the grammar school, they all moved down to Gillingham. Whether he’d got promoted, or whether they decided to restore the old drawing office in Chatham, and reunite it again, after the war, I don’t know quite. They moved back to Gillingham, and when they first arrived, they hadn’t got any accommodation, and they all came and lived with my father and mother, in Gillingham. So we—quite a crowd! Course I don’t know how many of us we were at the time—anyway, we did squeeze in for about three months.

She was a very outgoing Scottish, very strong Scottish accent, she had—very strong personality—very good fun, always had a great fund of laughter, and was very competent, and a real Scottish housewife really. I think she was quite a help to my mother, around the house. They stayed there three months . . . .

Well she was certainly a housewife full-time when I knew her, and I don’t think she did any work after that. Well, I think she may have worked herself, in the Co-op—she’d been under her sister Angela and the Co-op drapery stores before she married, and she may well have done work during the War, and immediately after the War, but I’ve no idea.

Aunt Hilda baked bread—that three months she was staying with us, she still brought her Scottish housewife practise of baking her own bread.

The Memoirs of Sidney Beck
1939-09-29 unpaid domestic duties, living with her family at 30 Windmill Road, Gillingham, Kent 1939 England and Wales Register (TNA: PRO RG 101)
1978-09-29 of 8 Gerrard Av., Rochester; d. Chatham, of 1a pulmonary embolism, 1b deep vein thrombosis 2a mucus cystadenoma right ovary information from Sidney Beck; GRO index; Orwin, accessed 2010-08-07; Find a will
1978-12-01 will proved at Brighton; £18,571 Find a will

 


Elsie Florence (Beck) Harding 10. Elsie Florence Beck

1896-04-20 b. 88 New Road, Chatham birth certificate; Beck family Bible
1901 living with family at 59 Salisbury Road, Chatham TNA: PRO RG 13/728 f87 p27
1911 draper's assistant, worker, living with family at 2 Thorold Road, Luton, Chatham PRO RG14PN3917 RG78PN149 RD47 SD1 ED33 SN203
1919-03-03 m. Harry Harding (1901–1991), Medway information from Sidney Beck; GRO index
 

Aunt Angela was the head of all the female staff there [at the Co-op drapery in Gillingham]; and she had got a post for her youngest sister, Elsie. Elsie was one of the junior assistants there, for a time. Elsie was quite high-spirited, and full of fun. Once Aunt Angela had to discipline her, for not conforming to the rules—I don’t quite know the actual incident at all, but I got the impression that she had given Elsie a dressing-down in front of all the staff, or of the particular section where she was working. Elsie was in a flaming temper, and resented this, and never forgave her, Angela, for humiliating her in that way. My understanding was that they never spoke to each other from that day onwards—or that’s the impression I’ve been given. This led to difficulties within the family circle, and I think accounted for Elsie eventually leaving home and going along, marrying someone who took her up to Newcastle, and—they had very little contact with the rest of the family.

The Memoirs of Sidney Beck
 

. . . "she separated up into Newcastle, and—never came down to Gillingham at all—and we only knew of her through correspondence."

The Memoirs of Sidney Beck
Child: Barbara (b. 1933) information from Sidney Beck; GRO index
1939-09-29 unpaid domestic duties, living with her husband at 24 Greywood Avenue, Fenham, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 1939 England and Wales Register (TNA: PRO RG 101)
1950-05-04 of 24 Greywood Avenue, N/C. on Tyne; with Harry and Barbara, visited the Becks at 20 Fortis Green Avenue, London N2; "a very pleasant meeting" Beck visitors' book
1968-06-03 of 3 Broomieknow, Leven, Fife, Scotland; with Harry, visited the Becks on the Fern; "a most enjoyable day" Fern visitors' book
1978-06 with Harry, visited Sidney and Ruth Beck at 44 St James Road, Ilkley Beck visitors' book
  . . . "had an outgoing frankness that you get in the North of England." The Memoirs of Sidney Beck
1985-12-04/-05 of 3 Broomieknow, Commercial Rd, Leven, Fife, KY8 4QP

Auntie is still in  Hosp'l at K'caldy but we were hoping she might be coming home soon. She was home last Wednesday when 2 young Physiotherapists brought her in a Hosp'l Taxi, to have a look at the House and they had her walking all round with the aid of a Zimmer and they seemed quite satisfied that I could look after her with the aid I have from a Home Help (3 mornings M, W & F) plus Meals-on-Wheels (3 days) which are quite good and help from the Family. However, it seems Auntie has a Urine infection and they want that cleared up so we just hope it may be corrected soon. It is 4 weeks today since they took her away, one of the saddest days of our long life Sidney, although I always knew something of this Kind would come along, but she is much better than when she left, as she couldn't walk and had little strength in her arms poor dear and the rest has helped her so that she is walking well now with the 'Zimmer', but she seems so forlorn and doesn't like the food—just wants to come home and says she will be home for Xmas for sure.

photocopied letter from Harry Harding to Sidney Beck
1987 of Leven, Fife, Scotland; d. information from Sidney Beck; ScotlandsPeople

 


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