The Baggs family of Hannington

Ken Smallbone's Baggs: The History of a Family. The Ancestors and Descendants of the Baggs Family of Hannington, Hampshire, England can now be purchased from The Changing Seasons

 

 

Henry Baggs = Elizabeth Wythe

     |         other children

John Baggs = Jane Gale

      |         other children

Henry Baggs = Elizabeth Rolfe

      |         other children

Walter Baggs = Alice Jane Ferry

      |         other children

Ruth Elizabeth Baggs = Reuben Alexander Beck

 

E1. RUTH ELIZABETH BECK born BAGGS

Ruth Elizabeth (Baggs) BeckRuth Elizabeth Baggs was born on the 22nd December 1882, at 32 Dover Street, Southampton.1

In 1891 she was living with her parents in prison quarters at H.M. Convict Prison, Gillingham, Kent. But following her father's transfer there, she spent most of her childhood in the Portland area of Dorset. The 1901 census finds her living with her family at 2, H. Quarters, Portland Prison. On 18 June 1904 she was baptised at St Peter's, Portland, Dorset. She wanted to be a teacher, and was in fact kept on at her school as a pupil teacher, for a time—probably until she was 15 or 16; but after her mother died Ruth, being the youngest daughter, was expected to stay to look after her father, which she did until her marriage. Eventually she found an outlet for her teaching skills at home, teaching her own children reading, writing, and cooking.2

On the 6th June 1910 she married [A2] Reuben Alexander Beck at St Mark's parish church, New Brompton, Kent; she was at that time living in New Brompton.3

In 1911 she was living with her husband in two rooms at 433 Canterbury Street, Gillingham. It must have been very soon after this that the couple moved to 31 Marlborough Road, Gillingham, where Ruth spent the rest of her life.3A

Their children were: Alexander William (1911–1969), Reuben Percival (1913–1989), [A1] Sidney John Thomas (1915–1998), William Arthur (1917–1991), Gladys Ruth May (1918–2001), and Edgar Robert (1921–1944). Ruth took out life insurance policies with the Prudential, at a penny a week, after each child arrived. She looked after the children very well, making sure they were properly fed, dressed, and educated. She was very long-suffering, with the children. She repaired their clothes, made curtains, and so on—though she had a woman come in on Mondays, to help with the laundry.4

When Reuben was temporarily transferred to Scotland, in 1916, she had six soldiers billeted on her, all sleeping in the attic. Towards the end of the First World War she helped to nurse her brother Bill Baggs, who had been wounded in Palestine.5

 

In contrast to her husband, she was short in stature, at 5'2".6

 

signature of Ruth E. Beck

 

Ruth Elizabeth (Baggs) Beck

After the children reached the age at which they rebelled against saying their prayers, Ruth would say a goodnight prayer for them at the foot of their bed, or at the door. She was a very kind and gentle woman, a very motherly creature. Though she had quite a strength of character in her own way, with quite strong principles, she was not very forceful impressing them on other people—she was very quiet and unassuming, a modest sort of person.7

As regards her politics, she was a Conservative voter—she used to wonder why she and Reuben bothered to vote, as they cancelled each other's out. In religion she was Wesleyan Methodist, going regularly to church of an evening. She would sometimes play the organ at the Central Hall in Chatham, if the regular organist was unable; though she was quite pleased to do this when asked, she always found it a bit of an ordeal, because she wasn't a very good player. After her father died in 1932, she used to play on his harmonium and sing hymns, in the parlour at home. On occasions she would go to a concert of religious music—Handel's Messiah at the Methodist Central Hall, or Stainer's Crucifixion, sung by the choir at the Old Brompton church, in about 1928—it was the religious aspect, rather than the music, that attracted her. She took her son Sidney to one or two revivalist meetings at the church in Chatham.8

In 1937 her son drew rather a bleak picture of his mother, in his diary: "Worn out almost, in poor health and having had little real pleasure she clings to the idea of a future home where all is peace & perfect happiness." In 1941 her daughter-in-law-to-be Ruth Pollard reported to her mother her first impressions of Sidney's mother, finding her ". . . particularly nice, & I'm glad to hear quite fussy over proprieties!!"9

Sidney’s and Ruth’s Mass-Observation diaries give occasional glimpses of Ruth E. Beck. In November 1941 she sent him a food parcel for his birthday. The following month she had a slight cold. In January 1942 she complained that the presence of her daughter-in-law and her children, who were living with them, was causing tensions. At the end of January 1943 she was reportedly not at all well.9A

When her son Edgar was killed in the Second World War, the shock aged her quite a bit. Later on in life she had heart trouble, and was always complaining of palpitations—perhaps having six children had affected her blood pressure. She also suffered from arthritis. There were quite a number of periods when she was unwell. On these occasions Reuben's drinking also gave her cause for complaint. She was a fairly staunch teetotaller herself, though she probably had a glass of port at Christmas.10

On the 27th March 1949, she suffered a stroke, and could no longer recognize anyone. She died peacefully at home, without regaining consciousness, at 5:20pm on Tuesday the 29th March 1949. The cause of her death was given as cerebral embolism, auricular fibrillation, and chronic rheumatic myocarditis. Her funeral took place at St Mark's church on the 2nd April, and she was buried in Gillingham New Cemetery on Woodlands Road (Class C, Section H, no. 4177).11

Ruth Elizabeth Baggs was the third child, second daughter, of [E2] Walter and [G1] Alice Jane Baggs.12

 

Reuben and Ruth Beck, 1937

Reuben and Ruth Beck, 1937

1 birth certificate

2 TNA: PRO RG 12/665 f121 p44 and PRO RG 13/1997 f79 p43; parish register; information from Sidney Beck; my own knowledge; Interview with Sidney Beck, conducted by Benjamin Beck & Debbie Wells, transcript by BSB

3 marriage certificate; parish register

3A PRO RG14PN3952 RG78PN150 RD47 SD2 ED23 SN26; information from Sidney Beck; 31 later renumbered as 225

4 information from Sidney Beck; interview with Sidney Beck, conducted by Benjamin Beck & Debbie Wells; interview with Sidney Beck, begun Easter 1986

5 interview with Sidney Beck, begun Easter 1986

6 interview with Sidney Beck, conducted by Benjamin Beck & Debbie Wells

7-8 interview with Sidney Beck, conducted by Benjamin Beck & Debbie Wells; interview with Sidney Beck, begun Easter 1986

9 Sidney Beck: Ms Diary; Diaries of Mary S.W. Pollard (Ms)

9A Sidney & Ruth Beck’s Mass-Observation diaries (D 5021 & D 4247)

10 interview with Sidney Beck, conducted by Benjamin Beck & Debbie Wells; interview with Sidney Beck, begun Easter 1986; Ms Memoirs, Sidney Beck

11 information from Sidney Beck; death certificate; notice of death Chatham, Rochester & Gillingham Observer 1 Apr 1949; Reuben A. Beck's diary/birthday book, formerly possessed by Gladys Mills; Sidney Beck: Ms Diary; newspaper obituary cutting inserted in Sidney Beck: Ms Diary

12 information from Sidney Beck; birth certificate


E2. WALTER BAGGS

Walter BaggsWalter Baggs was born on the 9th May 1854 in a cottage in Hannington, Hampshire. He was baptised in Hannington on the 4th June that year. In 1861 he was living with his parents at Cottingtons Hill, Kingsclere.1

In 1865 he received a great coat from a local charity.1A In 1871 he was living and working as a farm servant at Freemantle Farm, Hannington, in the household of Edward Spackman, the farmer.2

On 12 April 1877 he gave evidence at the inquest into the death of a fellow porter at the Southampton Dock station of the London & South-Western Railway Company. Reuben Crosbie had been standing on the buffer of a wagon when his foot got entangled in the traces of some other horses; he had fallen, and the wagon had gone over both legs; Crosbie had died a week later. Baggs had been close to Crosbie when the accident happened, being in charge of the horses concerned, but had been unable to turn them away as he himself was riding. The jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.2A

He married, first, [G1] Alice Jane Ferry, on the 31st October 1877, at St Luke's parish church, Southampton. He was at that time a railway porter, of St Mary's Road, Southampton. By 1879 he had removed, with his family, to 15 Lower Dover Street, Bevois Town, Southampton. In 1881 he was recorded as a railway porter, living at this address with his wife, two children, and a lodger. Their children were: Walter William (1879–1931), Alice Margaret (1881–1970), [E1] Ruth Elizabeth (1882–1949), and Frank Henry John (1888–1944); all except John were born in Southampton, John being born in Tavistock, Devon.3

By 1882 he had become a prison warder. By 1888 at the latest he was working as an assistant warder at Dartmoor, living in prison quarters in Princetown; one of his duties there was to witness the flogging of prisoners, whom he would have had to strap to the triangular metal frame, with the cat-o'-nine-tails. With effect from 1 June 1890, as an assistant warder, he was transferred from Dartmoor to Chatham, along with six other assistant warders. He appears in the 1891 census as an assistant prison warder, living with his family at H.M. Convict Prison, Gillingham, Kent. W.e.f. 1 September 1891 he was transferred from Chatham to Portsmouth, with four others. W.e.f. 1 March 1893, still as an assistant warder, he was transferred from Portsmouth to Portland. He was at Portland for much of the 1890s, living in prison quarters.4

One of these transfers—probably that from Dartmoor to Chatham—was apparently as the result of disciplinary action against him. It seems he had been let down by one of the prisoners—he had made some concessions to him, which the man abused, escaping from prison; although he was recaptured, he would not have escaped had it not been for Walter being a bit lax in the way he had dealt with him. The disciplining seems to have been of the nature of a reprimand, or a black mark on his record, which resulted in a transfer and probably ruled him out from further promotion.5

 

 

The 1901 census finds him as a warder at Portland Prison, living at 2, H. Quarters with his wife and three children. Some time after this he was probably transferred to Chatham prison. Not long afterwards he left the prison service, with a pension. By 1905 he was living at 68 Byron Road, Gillingham, where he remained until 1910. By 1907 he had become verger of Holy Trinity Church, Old Brompton.6

In 1911 he was a pensioner from the prison service, present occupation verger, St Mark’s Church, Gillingham, living with wife and daughter at 433 Canterbury Rd, Gillingham; 5 rooms.6A

He had moved to 433 Canterbury Street, Gillingham, the previous year, and lived there till 1915. In 1913 he was still described as a prison warder (retired), but by the end of the First World War Walter was working as a dockyard labourer; this was perhaps just for the duration of the war. After his first wife died, in 1918, he moved in with his daughter Ruth and the Beck family, at 31 Marlborough Road, Gillingham. He had the back room downstairs, between the living room and the front room.7

Around 1918–22 he used to enjoy visiting the bandstand in the park in the centre of Gillingham, taking Sidney and the younger Becks in the pram, and sitting in the shelter below the bandstand, talking to his acquaintances while listening to the band.8

A very early riser—a legacy from his prison days—he would join Reuben for an early breakfast; Reuben sometimes found him a bit of a trial at this time, being constantly around. However, they were basically good companions, and both enjoyed a game of cribbage in the winter evenings. Probably things became easier after Walter became verger at St Mark's and had another occupation, which must have been at about this time. Though he probably received a small payment for this service, he mainly just lived on his pension.9

 

Walter Baggs (extreme left) with other warders at Dartmoor prison

Walter Baggs (extreme left) with other warders at Dartmoor prison

As well as cribbage, Walter played dominoes and draughts with the Beck family. He had a harmonium, which, though not an expert, he used to enjoy playing, singing hymns to his own accompaniment. He had an allotment at the other end of Gillingham, on which he grew vegetables and flowers—mostly potatoes, and scarlet runners. He was quite knowledgeable about astronomy, helping his grandson Sidney to pick out the constellations. He took an active interest in current affairs. He also enjoyed talking about his past life and experiences.10

He was of medium build, a little bit severe-looking, with a rather square sort of face. Sidney always pictured him as grey-haired and a little bit grizzled—he hadn't shaved, or something. He hadsignature of Walter Baggs false teeth, which may have contributed to his stern appearance—certainly he was always happy around the Beck children.11

On the 7th January 1926 Walter remarried, at St Mark's, New Brompton. The bride was Alice Jouisa Jefferys (1862–1934), a friend of his childhood, then living in Bristol. The couple moved first to lodgings in York Avenue, then to two rooms on the ground floor of a house about a quarter of a mile from 31 Marlborough Road.12

After his second wife died—on the 3rd September 1934—Walter moved back to 225 Marlborough Road. He himself died not long afterwards—at 7pm on Friday the 1st March 1935, at 42 Magpie Hall Lane, Chatham; his death was caused by myocardial degeneration. His funeral service was held at the chapel in the cemetery.13

Walter Baggs was the sixth child, and third son, of [E3] Henry and [F1] Elizabeth Baggs.14


1 birth certificate (gives place of birth as Kingsclere); parish register; TNA: PRO RG 9/718 f30 p14; PRO RG 11/1205 f45 p26; information from Sidney Beck

1A Hampshire RO PK1; Ken Smallbone (2010) Baggs: The History of a Family. The Ancestors and Descendants of the Baggs Family of Hannington, Hampshire, England. Basingstoke: The Changing Seasons

2 PRO RG 10/1246 f114 p12

2A Hampshire Advertiser, 1877-04-14

3 marriage certificate; census returns; children's birth certificates; information from Sidney Beck—John; RG 11/1205 f45 p26; RG 12/665 f121 p44

4 daughter's birth certificate; son's birth certificate; information from Sidney Beck; information from Norah Baggs; PRO HO 160/1; interview with Sidney Beck, conducted by Benjamin Beck & Debbie Wells, transcript by BSB; PRO RG 12/665 f121 p44

5 interview with Sidney Beck, conducted by Benjamin Beck & Debbie Wells; Ms Memoirs, Sidney Beck; letters to me from Sidney & Ruth Beck

6 information from Sidney Beck; Kelly's Directory; daughter's marriage certificate; wives' death certificates; death certificate; RG 13/1997

6A RG14PN3952 RG78PN150 RD47 SD2 ED23 SN25

7 Kelly's Directory; first wife's death certificate; parish register entry for son's marriage; interview with Sidney Beck, conducted by Benjamin Beck & Debbie Wells; information from Sidney Beck

8 interview with Sidney Beck, begun Easter 1986

9 interview with Sidney Beck, begun Easter 1986; Ms Memoirs, Sidney Beck; interview with Sidney Beck, conducted by Benjamin Beck & Debbie Wells; information from Sidney Beck

10 interview with Sidney Beck, conducted by Benjamin Beck & Debbie Wells; interview with Sidney Beck, begun Easter 1986; Ms Memoirs, Sidney Beck

11 information from Sidney Beck; Ms Memoirs, Sidney Beck

12 marriage certificate; Ms Memoirs, Sidney Beck; information from Sidney Beck; interview with Sidney Beck, conducted by Benjamin Beck & Debbie Wells; GRO index; the second residence was probably at 9 Regent Road, where his second wife died [wife's death certificate]

13 indexes of the General Register Office; death certificate; Reuben A. Beck's diary/birthday book, formerly possessed by Gladys Mills; interview with Sidney Beck, begun Easter 1986

14 birth certificate; census returns; parish register

 


E3. HENRY BAGGS

Henry Baggs was baptised on the 8th May 1808 in Hannington, Hampshire.1

In 1841 he was an agricultural labourer, living with his mother in the Kingsclere parish part of Hannington—apparently in Hannington village itself.2

A labourer, of Kingsclere, he married [F1] Elizabeth Rolfe on the 16th March 1843, after banns, at the parish church in Dummere, Hampshire; he signed his name. Their children were: Henry (1844–1916), Rachel (1846–1882), John (1848–1927), Elizabeth (1851–1919), Jane (1851–1943), Hannah (1853–1863), [E2] Walter (1854–1935), and William (1858–1881); all were born in Kingsclere, and baptised in Hannington.3

Though still a labourer at the date of his marriage, by the following year he was working as a woodman, and in fact he continued working as a woodman till at least 1848.4

In the 1851 and 1861 censuses he is described as an agricultural labourer, of Cottingtons Hill, Kingsclere (really just outside Hannington), living with his family. He remained a farm labourer throughout his life, working and residing at Freemantle Farm (more probably Freemantle Park Farm) and Cottington Hill, both in the parish of Kingsclere; for a short period around 1853 he appears to have been at Walkeridge Farm, west of Freemantle Park.5

On 18 January 1856 he was given a jacket, as distributed by the administrators of a parochial charity in Hannington. Then on 1 January 1862 he also received a great coat; on New Year's Day in 1870 another jacket; and on 2 January 1871 a length of flannel. He had also received a boy's jacket on 8 January 1857, presumably for one of his sons; similarly in 1863 he was given a boy's great coat; and in 1865 and 1869 his sons Walter and William were also presented with great coats.5A

No occupation is given in the 1871 census entry—the only head of household in Hannington of which this is true—where again he appears resident in the Kingsclere part of Hannington, apparently in the village. He died on the 29th May 1872, in Hannington, after four weeks' paralysis.6

Henry Baggs was the eldest child of [E4] John and [E24] Jane Baggs.7

*** For an exhaustive treatment of the lives of Henry and Elizabeth Baggs, go to this .pdf file. ***


1 parish register. Born 1805–8, according to various census entries.

2 TNA: PRO HO 107/391/10 f29 p7

3 marriage certificate; parish register; PRO HO 107/1684 f162 p14; PRO RG 9/718 f30 p13; son's marriage certificate; children's birth certificates; Ken Smallbone (2010) Baggs: The History of a Family. The Ancestors and Descendants of the Baggs Family of Hannington, Hampshire, England. Basingstoke: The Changing Seasons; GRO index

4 marriage certificate; children's birth certificates

5 census returns; Smallbone (2010); information from family Bible (?); children's birth certificates; marriage certificate; death certificate. His son's marriage certificate and his widow's death certificate give his occupation simply as labourer and general labourer, respectively.

5A Hampshire RO PK1; Smallbone (2010)

6 TNA: PRO RG 10/1246 f29 p12; death certificate

7 parish register


E4. JOHN BAGGS

John Baggs was baptised on the 22nd May 1781, in Hannington, Hampshire.1

At the age of 14 his uncle Richard Wyeth nominated him as the 'third life' in the Wythe copyhold, but soon afterwards his interest was surrendered.2

He married [E24] Jane Gale on the 25th July 1805, at Bentley, Hampshire. After their marriage the couple returned to Hannington, and had eleven children. Their first child, John, was baptised in Bentley in 1806 (d. 1882); all subsequent children[E3] Henry (1808–1872), Charles (1810–1875), Catherine (1813–1888), Emily (1815–1886), James (1818–1898), Sarah (1820 – ?), Eli (1822–1909), Ann (1825 – after 1844), Edmund (1827–1902), and Elizabeth (1831–1862)—were baptised in Hannington.3

For most of his life he worked as a labourer4; but late in life he became a sieve maker.5

He died of a fistula on the 24th June 1838, in Kingsclere. He was buried in Hannington churchyard on the 26th June.6

John Baggs was the fifth child and first son of [E5] Henry and [E22] Elizabeth Baggs.7


1 parish register; death certificate would give year of birth as 1781–2.

2 Ken Smallbone (2010) Baggs: The History of a Family. The Ancestors and Descendants of the Baggs Family of Hannington, Hampshire, England. Basingstoke: The Changing Seasons

3 Smallbone (2010); an 1827 parish register entry describes him as of Kingsclere.

4 So described in all parish register entries 1813–31, and posthumously on his son's marriage certificate, 1843.

5 death certificate; widow's death certificate

6 death certificate; parish register; Smallbone (2010)

7 parish register; Smallbone (2010)


E5. HENRY BAGGS

Henry Baggs was baptised on the 9th February 1744/5 at St Swithun's church, Combe, Hampshire.1

In or about 1770 Henry and his elder brother William walked into Hannington, and decided to settle there.2 On the 25th November 1773 Henry married [E22] Elizabeth Wythe, after banns, at All Saints church, Hannington. Their children, all baptised in Hannington, where they continued to reside, were: Elizabeth (1774–1774), Elizabeth (1775–1775), Sarah (1776–1844), Mary (1777–1795), [E4] John (1781–1838), Joseph (1783–1860), Robert (1785–1801), Rachael (1787–1857), Richard (1789–1844), Hester (1790 – ?), Henry (1792–1873), Thomas (1794–1794), Hannah (1795–1887), and James (1798–1808).3

After their marriage the couple were provided with a moiety of the Wythe copyhold farmhouse, a large farmhouse at the centre of the Wythe copyhold estate, in the centre of the village, less than 100 metres from the village pond.4

From 1774 to 1783 he was described as a labourer.5

His body was buried in Hannington churchyard on the 23rd February 1807.6

Henry Baggs was the third child, and second son, of [E6] Henry and [E21] Sarah Baggs.7


1 Ken Smallbone (2010) Baggs: The History of a Family. The Ancestors and Descendants of the Baggs Family of Hannington, Hampshire, England. Basingstoke: The Changing Seasons

2 Smallbone (2010)

3 parish register; Smallbone (2010); the latter says 1773, and gives bride's name as Wyeth. parish register entry for marriage and for baptisms of first two children reads "Baughurst" crossed out and altered to "Baggs"; GRO index

4 Smallbone (2010)

5 parish register

6 parish register; Smallbone (2010)

7 Smallbone (2010)


E6. HENRY BAGGS

Henry Baggs was baptised on the 25th May 1716, at St Swithun's church, Combe, Hampshire.1

A farm labourer, during the early years of his working life he was apt to travel from farm to farm for work. He married [E21] Sarah Challis on the 22nd September 1741, at Sherborne St John, near Basingstoke. At the time of his marriage it is most probable that he was employed as a labourer on a farm at Sherborne, and that after Michaelmas quarter–day (that being the end of the farming year) he moved back to Combe, where the couple remained for the duration of their lives. Their children were: Thomas (1741/2 – ?), Elizabeth (1742/3–1754), [E5] Henry (1745–1807), Sarah (1747/8–1749), John (1749/50–1750), Joseph (1752–1832), William (1755–1825), Mary (1757 – ?), Harriet (1760 – ?), and Susannah (? – ?); all but Susannah were baptised at Combe.2

He was buried in Combe churchyard on the 7th April 1784. The parish register records him as a pauper, but at this date this was a common description, as it was soon after the introduction of a tax on burials, from which paupers were exempt.3

Henry Baggs was the third child, and third son, of [E7] Robert and [E20] Elizabeth Baggs.4


1–4 Ken Smallbone (2010) Baggs: The History of a Family. The Ancestors and Descendants of the Baggs Family of Hannington, Hampshire, England. Basingstoke: The Changing Seasons


E7. ROBERT BAGGS

Robert Baggs was baptised on the 11th April 1692, in Hungerford, Berkshire.1

By 1712 he had crossed the Berkshire-Hampshire border and settled, a labourer, in Combe, Hampshire. He married, first, [E20] Elizabeth ____. Their children were: Robert (1712–1714), Thomas (1714 – ?), [E6] Henry (1716–1784), Elizabeth (1719 – ?), Robert (1720–1720), and William (1722 – after 1767)—all were baptised at Combe. After Elizabeth's death he married Francis Holloway, on the 3rd August 1735, at Speen, Berkshire. His children with his second wife were: Mary (1737 – ?), Sarah (1738/9–1738/9), Sarah (1741–1751), Robert (1744 – ?), Amy (1747–1748), Richard (1749/50 – ?), and John (1754 – after 1774); all were baptised at Combe.2

He died between 1753 and the 14th May 1775.3

Robert Baggs was the third known child, and third son, of [E8] Robert and [E19] Joane Baggs.4


1-4 Ken Smallbone (2010) Baggs: The History of a Family. The Ancestors and Descendants of the Baggs Family of Hannington, Hampshire, England. Basingstoke: The Changing Seasons


E8. ROBERT BAGGS

Robert Baggs was baptised on the 16th November 1662, at Stanford-in-the-Vale, Berkshire.1

In his teens he hired out his services as a day-labourer in farms in and around Stanford-in-the-Vale and Hinton Waldrist. He remained in the northern Berkshire area six or seven years.2

He married [E19] Joane ____ some time before 1685. In or about 1691 he finally broke free of the district and moved to the far south of the county. He had probably put himself up for hire at the Wantage Michaelmas Fair. He settled in Hungerford, where the family remained for a number of years. He was still living in the Hungerford area in 1702. The couple's children were: Aaron (1685 – possibly 1725), Robert (1689–1689)—both baptised in Hinton Waldrist; possibly Thomas (1690 – after 1715); and [E7] Robert (1692 – before 1775)—baptised in Hungerford.3

He seems to have led a quiet and uneventful life. He died before 1724, probably somewhere in southern Berkshire.4

Robert Baggs was the second child, and second son, of [E9] Henry and [E18] Joice Baggs (Henry's sixth child and fourth son).5


1-5 Ken Smallbone (2010) Baggs: The History of a Family. The Ancestors and Descendants of the Baggs Family of Hannington, Hampshire, England. Basingstoke: The Changing Seasons


E9. HENRY BAGGS

Henry Baggs—also known as Harry—was baptised on the 18th June 1599, at Hinton Waldrist parish church, Berkshire.1

He first married Mary Woodlye, on the 16th September 1623, at Hinton Waldrist church. Soon after this marriage, the couple moved away from Hinton, but where to is not known. No children of this marriage are known.2

He married, secondly, Margery Wilkins, on the 4th November 1644, at Stanford-in-the-Vale, Berkshire. Their children were: Henry (c. 1646 – ?), Jane (1648/9 – ?), Joan (1652 – ?), and Thomas (1655 – after 1698)—the three dated baptisms being at Stanford.3

It is most likely that he fought in the royal army in the Civil War, as a member of the North Berkshire Militia. The first recorded baptism of one of his children was in 1649, after the war had ended. He was an Anglican, and regular to the church services at Stanford.4

He married as his third wife [E18] Joice ____. Their children were: Richard (1660/1 – ?), [E8] Robert (1662 – between 1692 & 1724), Mary (1662/3 – ?), Edward (1666–1668), John (1666/7–1740), and Ann (1671 – ?)—all baptised at Stanford-in-the-Vale.5

On the 24th March 1688 he made his will, in which he described himself as a husbandman of Stanford-in-the-Vale, weak in body but of good and perfect mind and memory. He left 12d each to Henry, Robert, Thomas and John Baggs, his sons, and 12d each to Jane, Mary, and Ann Baggs his daughters; he left Richard his "house and backside wherein now I live in Stanford in the vale aforesd together with three Acres of Eareable land liing in the comon fields belonging to the sd town that is to say one acre liing in the east field in a furlong called redwell and one acre more liing nex to Farringdon gate." For several years past he had given up his life work to his son, when he lived in retirement in the house.6

His body was buried on the 27th April 1689 at Stanford-in-the-Vale, a "widdower an aged man".7 His will was proved on the 7th May 1689, at the Archdeaconry Court in Oxford. An inventory of his effects, taken three days earlier, in which he was described as a yeoman, showed him possessed of "wearing Apparrell (10s), Pewter and Brass (13s 4d), Wooden vessell (5/-), Three Coffers (2/6), A Bedsteed with that as belongeth to it (2/6), Six prongs and two shovells (4/-), dunge (2/8), two Chayers and other lumber (2/-)".8

Henry Baggs was the third child, and second son, of [E10] Richard and [E17] Margaret Baggs .9


1–9 Ken Smallbone (2010) Baggs: The History of a Family. The Ancestors and Descendants of the Baggs Family of Hannington, Hampshire, England. Basingstoke: The Changing Seasons


E10. RICHARD BAGGS

Richard Baggs was baptised on the 24th May 1562, at Hinton Waldrist, Berkshire.1

He married [E17] Margaret ____ before 1594. Their children were: Cicely (1594 – after 1636), Richard (1596–1665), [E9] Henry/Harry (1599–1689), Robert (1602 – after 1636), Margaret (1605–1700), and Mary (1607 – after 1636).2

He worked on his own land as a yeoman farmer, at Duxford, in Hinton Waldrist parish. By the time of his death the farm had become a fairly profitable concern.3

His body was buried on the 29th April 1631, in Hinton Waldrist churchyard.4

Richard Baggs was the eldest child of [E11] Richard and [E16] Marian Baggs.5


1–5 Ken Smallbone (2010) Baggs: The History of a Family. The Ancestors and Descendants of the Baggs Family of Hannington, Hampshire, England. Basingstoke: The Changing Seasons


E11. RICHARD BAGGS

Born in the late 1530s, Richard Baggs married [E16] Marian Taylour on the 10th February 1559/60 at Hinton Waldrist parish church, Berkshire. Their children were: [E10] Richard (1562–1631), Robert (1566–1580), Dorothy (1568 – after 1596), Henry (1570 – ?), Cicilie (1572 – ?), and Elizabeth (1575 – ?); all were baptised at Hinton Waldrist. The family lived at Duxford.1

A husbandman of Duxford, Hinton Waldrist, he made his will on the 13th November 1599. He was "sicke in bodie, but whole in minde"; he wished to be buried in Longworthe churchyard; he left 2d to "the Catheadrall Church of New Saru[m]", and to his son Richard "one Boate and one maultmill", to his daughter Dorothie Allaway 12d, the residue to his wife and son Harry jointly.2

He died on about the 15th November 1599, and was buried at Hinton Waldrist on the 17th. His will was proved in the archdeacon's court on the 31st December. The inventory, taken ten days previously, shows him possessed of: "in the halle a borde frame and forme (5/-); in the chambers two beds and two bedsteads (28/8); brass and povater (13/4); in the kichine one malltmylle and a bolle? (14/-); two trows (6/8); tubes barreles (12/-); anders and spites (5/-); -------beast (£6); two cowes (14/-); piges or wshies? (20/-); vii shaip (30/-); his apparle? (20/-); whate and peanes? (30/-)"; giving a total value of £15/16/8d (£1593 at 2005 values). He seems to have been of the poorer class of yeoman compared with his father.

Richard Baggs was a son of [E12] Peter and [E15] Mawde Baggs .3


1–3 Ken Smallbone (2010) Baggs: The History of a Family. The Ancestors and Descendants of the Baggs Family of Hannington, Hampshire, England. Basingstoke: The Changing Seasons


E12. PETER BAGGS

Peter Baggs married [E15] Mawde ____. Their children were: Henry (? – after 1564), [E11] Richard (1530s – 1599), and Robert (? – 1586).1

On the 10th June 1543 he made his will. At this time he was living in Longworth, Berkshire. He left to Mawde "ii kene and iii tewlmonthlyngs", and to his three children "iiii kene"; John and George Baggs, his brothers, were to have oversight of the four cows on their behalf; he left George a calf, as he did Elizabeth Baggs; he left his father and mother five shillings, and his son Richard a maser; the residue was left to his wife.2

He died at the end of July 1543, at Longworth. His will was proved in the Berkshire Archdeaconry court in August that year. The inventory of his effects had been appraised on the 5th August. Peter was said to have lived at Duxford, Berkshire. His worldly wealth consisted of a horse (5/8), 2 kyne (16s), 3 yerlings (12/-), 2 Schepe (2/-), a bacon hogge and 2 pyggs (3/4), 2 brasse potts and a postnet (5/-), a brasse pan (3/4), a cawdern (20d), a ketyll and a bason (12d), 7 pewter platters (3/6), 2 potteniers and a Sawcer (10d), bords formis stoles trestells and barrells (5/-), a cupburd (2/4), a chaffinge disshe (8d), a frysed cote (3/-), the pulse off 3½ acres (12/-), one akers barley (20d), a stacke of whete cotaynynge a quarter (8/-), 4 kyne (40/-), and a maser (6/8); total value: £6/14/10 (£2073 at 2005 values).3

The cottage in which he and his family lived would have been the usual yeoman's home, built on a timber frame and with walls of mud and wattle. It was probably a two-storeyed affair with a single room on both floors and a central hearth. Rooms were added by erecting temporary walls which were nailed to the ceiling timbers. When the family matured and the offspring moved away then these temporary dividers were removed. The farm itself comprised little more than five acres of land, probably scattered round the parish in strips. The livestock was few in quantity yet typical of the 16th century farm. The farm was obviously situated at Duxford, which would suggest that that tithing was on the eastern edge of the parish of Hinton Waldrist, alongside Longworth.4

Peter Baggs was a son of [E13] ____ and [E14] Baggs.5


1–5 Ken Smallbone (2010) Baggs: The History of a Family. The Ancestors and Descendants of the Baggs Family of Hannington, Hampshire, England. Basingstoke: The Changing Seasons


E13. ____ BAGGS

____ Baggs married [E14] ____ ____. Their children were probably [E12] Peter (? –1543), George (? – 1596), John (? –  after 1543), and Elizabeth (? – after 1543).1

 

1–5 Ken Smallbone (2010) Baggs: The History of a Family. The Ancestors and Descendants of the Baggs Family of Hannington, Hampshire, England. Basingstoke: The Changing Seasons


E14. ____ BAGGS born ____

____ ____ married [E13] ____ Baggs. Their children were probably [E12] Peter (? –1543), George (? – 1596), John (? – after 1543), and Elizabeth (? – after 1543).1

 

1–5 Ken Smallbone (2010) Baggs: The History of a Family. The Ancestors and Descendants of the Baggs Family of Hannington, Hampshire, England. Basingstoke: The Changing Seasons


E15. MAWDE BAGGS born ____

Mawde ____ was born in 1513, at Longworth, Berkshire. She married [E12] Peter Baggs. Their children were: Henry (? – after 1564), [E11] Richard (1530s – 1599), and Robert (? – 1586).1

She may have died or remarried before 1559. However a Maude Baggs was buried at St Margaret’s, Hinton Waldrist, Berkshire, in 1576.2


1 Col Heading gedcom; Ken Smallbone (2010) Baggs: The History of a Family. The Ancestors and Descendants of the Baggs Family of Hannington, Hampshire, England. Basingstoke: The Changing Seasons

2 Smallbone (2010); National Burial Index, 2nd edition


E16. MARIAN BAGGS born TAYLOUR

Marian Taylour married [E11] Richard Baggs on the 10th February 1559/60, at Hinton Waldrist church, Berkshire. Their children were: [E10] Richard (1562–1631), Robert (1566–1580), Dorothy (1568 – after 1596), Henry (1570 – ?), Cicilie (1572 – ?), and Elizabeth (1575 – ?); all were baptised at Hinton Waldrist. The family lived at Duxford.1

On the 13th November 1599 she was a witness of her husband's will. She herself died soon afterwards, as an administration order was made on her estate in 1600, in Berkshire.2


1–2 Ken Smallbone (2010) Baggs: The History of a Family. The Ancestors and Descendants of the Baggs Family of Hannington, Hampshire, England. Basingstoke: The Changing Seasons


E17. MARGARET BAGGS born ____

Margaret ____ married [E10] Richard Baggs. Their children were: Cicely (1594 – after 1636), Richard (1596–1665), [E9] Henry/Harry (1599–1689), Robert (1602 – after 1636), Margaret (1605–1700), and Mary (1607 – after 1636).1

On the 31st March 1634/5 she made her will, a widow, of Duxford. To her daughter Margrett she left £10 within 1 year, and £10 within the next 6 months, as well as "my little table boarde and two Joyned stooles"; to her daughter Mary Robins £17 when she becomes worth 40/- p.a.; to Margrette and May "all my bedding and lining" to be divided equally; to daughter Sisly Sheares 2/-; to son Harry Bagges 2/-; to son Robert Bagges 2/-; the residue to Richard Bagges, executor; she marked her name.2

She died at the end of December 1635, being buried on the 30th, presumably at Hinton Waldrist. Her will was proved on the 1st January 1635/6, in the Archdeacon's court. An inventory of her goods was taken on the 8th January, and exhibited at the next court on the 21st. She died possessed of: her purse and apparrell and money in her purse (1/-); in her bedde Chamber: 1 standing bed stedde, 1 fether bedde, 2 Fether pillowes, 1 pare of shetts, 1 Covrlet, 1 balnket and a Chaffe bedde (40/-); in her bedde Chamber: 1 truckle bedde & 2 pillowes, 1 sorry Covrlet & a straw bedde (10/-), 3 Coffers and a chamber pot and a stole (6/-); in the halle: 1 table borde, 1 litle table borde, 1 Cubbord & 10 stoles, 1 Chayre (28/-); Iron in the halle: 1 payre of Andyrons, 2 pott hangers, 1 fyer shovle, 2 smale pewter Dishes, 3 Candlesticks 2 brase & 1 of pewter and other lumber in the howse (6/-); in an other Chamber: halfe a quarter of mault, a bushill of beanes, halfe a bushill of rye (14/-), one dowe kever, 1 litle kever, 1 searcher (4/-); in the lower Chamber: 1 bed stede & 1 flocke bedde, 1 strawe bede, 2 pillowes & a boulster, a Flagg matt, 1 pare of shetts, 1 blankett & 1 Covrlett, a litle shorte table borde, a Coffer & a pronge & a stole (30/-), a pare of shettes & 4 napkins, a table Cloth (10/-); in the aple loft: 2 shelves and some chesses, an ould Coffer (5/-); in the milke howse: 3 ledging barrels and 1 Churme, 5 Earthene panes, 4 Chese vates, 2 letherne bottles, 1 Fryin pane, 1 earthene pott, 2 shelves & other lumber in the same howse at (12/-); In the Kitchine: 3 kettles, 1 little brase pott, 1 little skillett, 1 little Elevate, 2 Coules, 2 bucketts, 1 kever & a powdering tub, a hatchett & a bill, a powdringe trough, a ladle & halfe a dussen of spones, a dussen of trenchers with other lumber in the kitchine (40/-), a hogg & 2 fliches of bacon (£2/13/4d), 5 bushills of mault upon the nost [?] (13/-); in the Mill Howse: a mill and a yoateing vate, a broade shovle, 1 cocke & 3 hennes (18/-); in the backe side: 6 rother beasts and a weaneing calf (£14), a stacke of hay (£6), 2 store piggs (14/-), a stacke of wheate sheives (20/-), a stack of beanes (32/-), a yerde sowen (6/-), 5 acares of land (40/-), 2 beasts Comons (14/-), the whome close and all the hams (£6), the severall water (6/8), a loade of fyer woode (5/-); total: £49/17/- (£4277 at 2005 values). She was in debt to three men, to the tune of £6. The expenses of her burial had come to £3.3

Given that inflation had only risen by 20% since the death of her father-in-law Richard Baggs in 1596, whereas Margaret's estate was worth nearly three times that of his, it seems that the Baggses had prospered in the previous 40 years.4


1–4 Ken Smallbone (2010) Baggs: The History of a Family. The Ancestors and Descendants of the Baggs Family of Hannington, Hampshire, England. Basingstoke: The Changing Seasons


E18. JOICE BAGGS born ____

Joice ____ married [E9] Henry Baggs after 1660. Their children were: Richard (1660/1 – ?), [E8] Robert (1662 – between 1692 & 1724), Mary (1662/3 – ?), Edward (1666–1668), John (1666/7–1740), and Ann (1671 – ?)—all baptised at Stanford-in-the-Vale.1

She was buried on the 17th January 1674/5, in Stanford-in-the-Vale churchyard, Berkshire.2


1–2 Ken Smallbone (2010) Baggs: The History of a Family. The Ancestors and Descendants of the Baggs Family of Hannington, Hampshire, England. Basingstoke: The Changing Seasons


E19. JOANE BAGGS born _____

Joane ____ married [E8] Robert Baggs before 5 Dec 1685. The couple's children were: Aaron (1685 – possibly 1725), Robert (1689–1689)—both baptised in Hinton Waldrist; possibly Thomas (1690 – after 1715); and [E7] Robert (1692 – before 1775)—baptised in Hungerford. The family remained in the northern Berkshire area about six or seven years. In or about 1691 they finally broke free of the district and moved to the south of the county, settling in Hungerford, where the family remained a number of years.1

As their sons grew to maturity, she and Robert led quiet and eventless lives. With Robert's death (before 1724), she moved in with the family of their son Aaron, who had returned to Hinton Waldrist by 1721—Joane may have moved there with them, or joined them there after Robert's death. She lived her last years at Hinton, and was buried in the churchyard there on the 8th May 1724.2


1–2 Ken Smallbone (2010) Baggs: The History of a Family. The Ancestors and Descendants of the Baggs Family of Hannington, Hampshire, England. Basingstoke: The Changing Seasons


E20. ELIZABETH BAGGS born ____

Elizabeth ____ married [E7] Robert Baggs before 15 November 1712. Their children were: Robert (1712–1714), Thomas (1714 – ?), [E6] Henry (1716–1784), Elizabeth (1719 – ?), Robert (1720–1720), and William (1722 – after 1767)—all were baptised at Combe.1

She was buried on the 7th February 1733/4, in St Swithun's churchyard, Combe, Hampshire.2


1–2 Ken Smallbone (2010) Baggs: The History of a Family. The Ancestors and Descendants of the Baggs Family of Hannington, Hampshire, England. Basingstoke: The Changing Seasons


E21. SARAH BAGGS born CALLIS

Sarah Callis married [E6] Henry Baggs on the 22nd September 1741 at Sherborne St John, near Basingstoke. She was described as of Burghclere.1

After the marriage, they returned to Combe, where they remained for the duration of their lives. Their children were: Thomas (1741/2 – ?), Elizabeth (1742/3–1754), [E5] Henry (1745–1807), Sarah (1747/8–1749), John (1749/50–1750), Joseph (1752–1832), William (1755–1825), Mary (1757 – ?), Harriet (1760 – ?), and Susannah (? – ?); all but Susannah were baptised at Combe.2

She was buried on the 22nd September 1797, in Combe churchyard.


1 Ken Smallbone (2010) Baggs: The History of a Family. The Ancestors and Descendants of the Baggs Family of Hannington, Hampshire, England. Basingstoke: The Changing Seasons. She was not baptised at Burghclere. The IGI has the baptism of Sarah, daughter of William and Mary Challice, at Welford on the 16th August 1724 (favoured by Smallbone); and the marriage of Willam Challes and Mary Hearth at Wickham on the 7th April 1711.

2–3 Smallbone (2010)


E22. ELIZABETH BAGGS born WYTHE

Elizabeth Wythe was born in 1755.1

She married [E5] Henry Baggs on the 25th November 1773, at All Saints church, Hannington, Hampshire, after banns. In 1773 the newly married couple were provided with a moiety of the Wythe copyhold farmhouse. Their children, all baptised in Hannington, where they continued to reside, were: Elizabeth (1774–1774), Elizabeth (1775–1775), Sarah (1776–1844), Mary (1777–1795), [E4] John (1781–1838), Joseph (1783–1860), Robert (1785–1801), Rachael (1787–1857), Richard (1789–1844), Hester (1790 – ?), Henry (1792–1873), Thomas (1794–1794), Hannah (1795–1887), and James (1798–1808).2

She was buried in Hannington churchyard on the 1st June 1837.3

Elizabeth Wythe was a daughter of [E23] Richard and [E25] Elizabeth Wyeth.4


1 Ken Smallbone (2010) Baggs: The History of a Family. The Ancestors and Descendants of the Baggs Family of Hannington, Hampshire, England. Basingstoke: The Changing Seasons; International Genealogical Index shows the birth at Hannington in 1755, to Richard and Elizabeth Wythe.

2 parish register; Smallbone (2010), which says 1773.

3–4 Smallbone (2010)


E23. RICHARD WYETH

Richard Wyeth married [E25] Elizabeth  ____. Their children were probably Richard (1752 – after 1782), [E22] Elizabeth (1755–1837), Sarah (? – ?), Mary (? – ?), and John (? – 1804). Richard was copyhold tenant of the manor of Manydown, Hampshire, from the death of his father in 1772. In 1773 he borrowed £34 so that he could afford a dowry for his daughter Elizabeth, of Thomas Webb, yeoman (often called 'squire') of Hannington, on mortgage at 3% p.a.1

He died in 1795.2

Richard Wyeth was the child of [E24] ____ Wyeth.3


1 Ken Smallbone (2010) Baggs: The History of a Family. The Ancestors and Descendants of the Baggs Family of Hannington, Hampshire, England. Basingstoke: The Changing Seasons; International Genealogical Index shows the marriage of a Richard and Elizabeth Wythe in Hannington, apparently in 1754, as well as the birth of a Richard Wythe about 1710, in Hannington.

2–3 Smallbone (2010)


E24. ____ WYETH

____ Wyeth died in 1772.1

 

1 Ken Smallbone (2010) Baggs: The History of a Family. The Ancestors and Descendants of the Baggs Family of Hannington, Hampshire, England. Basingstoke: The Changing Seasons

 


 

E25. ELIZABETH WYETH born ____

Elizabeth ____ was born in about 1728. She married [E23] Richard Wyeth. Their children were probably Richard (1752 – after 1782), [E22] Elizabeth (1755–1837), Sarah (? – ?), Mary (? – ?), and John (? – 1804). She died in 1807.1


 

1 Ken Smallbone (2010) Baggs: The History of a Family. The Ancestors and Descendants of the Baggs Family of Hannington, Hampshire, England. Basingstoke: The Changing Seasons


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